David Brain | 1 Jan 01:17 2006
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Re: Louix XIV Question

mschoessow wrote:
> In the rules, under Game End, it states that each influence marker on 
> a personage tile is worth 1 shield. My question is this: How can there 
> be any influence markers on personages at the end of a round since the 
> rules seem to state that at the end of each Influence phase all 
> markers get returned to players' private or common supplies? Thanks 
> for any clarification that can be supplied.
> 
If that was the case, then winning control of a couple of the personages 
would be entirely useless, as they grant you an influence marker 
elsewhere in readiness for the next round.  Since there isn't a next 
round at the end of the game, the reward is a shield instead.
Likewise, winning control of the guy who gives you an Influence card 
isn't any good either, so you trade that in for a shield too.

--

-- 
David Brain
London, UK

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Mike Schoessow | 1 Jan 01:07 2006
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Re: Louix XIV Question

Ah, never mind; I just figured it out. Sorry for the bother :-)

_Mike Schoessow
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: mschoessow 
  To: spielfrieks@... 
  Sent: Saturday, December 31, 2005 3:59 PM
  Subject: [spielfrieks] Louix XIV Question

  In the rules, under Game End, it states that each influence marker on 
  a personage tile is worth 1 shield. My question is this: How can there 
  be any influence markers on personages at the end of a round since the 
  rules seem to state that at the end of each Influence phase all 
  markers get returned to players' private or common supplies? Thanks 
  for any clarification that can be supplied.

  -Mike Schoessow

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pfbrennan | 1 Jan 04:12 2006

Last And First

Last game of 2005: Durch Die Wuste. Fleur and Mum are at a point now where
none of us get away with anything, forcing us all to think even further
ahead. A nice tight game of one of the all time great games.

First game of 2006: Ticket To Ride. Teaching my 7 year old how to play after
she asked. Understanding the mechanics (easy) and understanding how to play
well (hard) are two very different things. Another quality game though and
the year is off and running.

Patrick

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W. Eric Martin | 1 Jan 08:26 2006
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Re: Last And First

pfbrennan wrote:
> Last game of 2005: Durch Die Wuste.
> First game of 2006: Ticket To Ride.

My games were a bit more pedestrian:

Last game of 2005: Jungle Speed
First game of 2006: Another game of Jungle Speed

Eric

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W. Eric Martin - TwoWriters.net
"And neither mathematics nor death ever makes a mistake." - Yevgeny Zamyatin

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Michael Svellov | 1 Jan 11:37 2006
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Re: semantics -- was, What is a wargame?

Chess is for me the mother of all wargames.
As for WAR, I would say that it is a "cardgame" a "wargame" and "a waste of time".

Mik

Doug Orleans <dougorleans@...> wrote:
> Mik Svellov writes:
>  > In that case my definition of a "wargame" is any GAME
> that has WAR as the
>  > overall theme.
> 
> Do you include Chess and the card game War?
> 
> Are there any games with "wargame" mechanics but whose theme
> is actually
> not war?
> 
> --dougorleans@...
> 
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pfbrennan | 1 Jan 13:08 2006

5 and 10's

A nice gaming year for me ... 377 different titles, 100 new games, 964
plays, 67 games played 5 times or more. A fair number of these are kids
games (7 and 5 yr old) but I decided to include them as a guide to what
works for us for those of you with a family.

10's for this year were (in order of most plays to least):

Geschenkt
Zirkus Flohcati
Backgammon
Bluff
Lost Cities
Kupferkessel Co.
Take It Easy
Hamster Rolle
Ticket To Ride
Chronology
Coda
Speed
San Juan
Ubongo
Rosenkonig
Schild Kroten Rennen
Boggle
Crokinole
Memory

5's for this year are:

Alles Im Eimer
(Continue reading)

Scott Nicholson | 1 Jan 14:16 2006

"Board Games with Scott" formal opening

With the new year, I'm announcing the formal start of the "Board Games
with Scott" video blog (or vlog). I've got some content up already for
you to enjoy, and plan to post information about a different game
every week at http://boardgameswithscott.com

My goal with this project is to take a game and talk about it then
provide a brief review. I'm a teacher by trade and see this as an
educational project - I want to teach you the basics of the game and
give you enough information to help you decide if you want to try or
buy it.

The focus in the segments will be on the explanation and not on the
review. I've found that different people enjoy very different things
in games. My hope is that I'll provide you with enough information to
let you decide if the game is something you'd be interested in.

I'll also be doing special episodes that are outside the normal
explanation/review format. I've already got one special episode that
explains the basic major categories of these types of games. I'll also
be doing an "All About Scott" episode and, once I'm comfortable with
the process, a session on how to Vlog.

I've got 2 reviews of games up so far as well as a special "Board
Games 101" episode, all of which can be found at Board Games with
Scott.  I will be doing some deeper games - next week, for example, is
Friedrich.

I'll be posting announcements of the new entries at Boardgamegeek,
there's an RSS feed at
http://feeds.feedburner.com/boardgameswithscott, and if you are a
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Tom Vasel | 1 Jan 16:28 2006
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[Review] Australian Rails

	Russian Rails was my first foray into the world of "crayon railway"
games, and I enjoyed it enough that I picked up some miniature trains
from Mayfair to run on my tracks.  When I got Australian Rails
(Mayfair Games, 2005 -  Larry Roznai), I was once again pleased to be
playing on a continent that I was unfamiliar with, because it's more
interesting to me and a bit educational, too.

	Australian Rails (AR) wasn't as interesting to me as Russian Rails -
simply because the "Fall of Communism" made the latter game so
fascinating.  However, I did enjoy the map quite a bit.  All of my
comments from my Russian Rails review
(http://www.thedicetower.com/reviews/russianrails.htm) apply to AR,
with the following comments added…

1.)	Australia:  Perhaps not so exotic for native Australians, but to
the rest of the world, or perhaps just Tom Vasel - Australia is a
pretty neat place.  The map is quite interesting, with the majority of
the cities scattered around the edges, and players will compete to
build routes that run from one side to the other.  I confess to
knowing little to none about the Australian map before playing this
game - now I can tell you where most of the main cities are.  That's
education for ya!

2.)	Desert:  The middle of Australia is filled with large deserts. 
It's quite possible for a Sand Storm cards to be drawn from the event
deck, which wipes out all tracks in a certain desert.  All players
should be notified about this possibility before the game begins, so
that they aren't surprised.  If a player's tracks are destroyed in the
desert, it should be because they took a knowing risk, and it didn't
end well.   Building in the desert isn't THAT expensive, but a player
(Continue reading)

Tom Vasel | 1 Jan 16:36 2006
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[Review] Bosworth

	When I originally played Card Chess, I wasn't sure who would be
interested in this version of four-player chess.  While I enjoyed it,
it certainly wasn't for everyone; Chess purists would be unhappy with
how the game worked, and folks who didn't like Chess were unlikely to
be won over.  When I read the rules to Bosworth, I figured that the
same thing would be the case, as it was another four-player variant on
chess.  However, John Kovalic's artwork and the small board interested
me, so I was ready to give it a go (Oh, who am I kidding - I'm always
ready to play a new game!)

	As much as Card Chess intrigued me, I found Bosworth to be a
"tighter", nicer game.  While retaining a luck element (something I
wasn't adverse to), Bosworth also uses a mere sixteen to twenty-four
spaces, as opposed to the sixty-four of the chessboard.  Using almost
the same rules as chess (with a few distinct differences), the game is
a quick, deadly affair and plays equally as well with four as with
two.  (Three is a little "iffy".)

(I'm assuming the reader knows how to play chess.)

The game is played on a five by five grid of squares with the corners
not used.  Each player places four pawn pieces on each end space on
their side of the board.  If there are less than four players playing,
the sides of the board that are not used have markers placed in them
to show that those four spaces are not used.   Players take the rest
of the twelve pieces (the rest of the chess set - but pictures on the
side of a disc, rather than plastic pieces) and shuffle them into a
pile, drawing four of them into their hands.  One player is chosen to
go first, and then play proceeds clockwise around the table.

(Continue reading)

Tom Vasel | 1 Jan 16:42 2006
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[Review] Hunting Party

	Hunting Party (Seaborn Games, 2005 - Ben and Patrick Christenson)
claims that it is "German Strategy meets American Fantasy".  That is
certainly a combination that I enjoy, so I was certainly eager to get
my hands on a copy of the game.  After some shipping snafus, I finally
got a copy and was intrigued upon reading over the rules.  Hunting
Party has one of the most interesting and unique mechanics I've seen
in a game in a long while - the "shares" involved.

	The game itself resembles a little bit of Clue mixed with Fantasy
special abilities, and a bit of "fighting".  There are some problems
with the game - such as some game length issues with certain players,
and sometimes entirely too much chaos with special abilities. 
However, the components are very nicely done for a new company (with a
few problems), and all in all, it's an impressive first offering from
Seaborn Games.  Hunting Party certainly won't please everyone, and I
can see that certain combinations of special abilities may take some
games to endless loops of repetition, but anyone looking for a fantasy
deduction game will find it here.

	The game works best with three players, although rules for two, four,
and five players are included.  Each player is given a "prophecy
tablet" and a sheet of paper, eight "shares" of one color, and three
pieces of gold.  The rest of the gold (and silver, four of which
equals one gold) is placed in the bank.  Twelve stacks of cards are
shuffled and placed in a four by three grid, so that they form a map
of a kingdom.  Three piles represent market locations, four represent
Hunting locations, and five represent Hiring locations.  Each player
takes one card from the top of the Hiring location of their choice,
which becomes their "Hero" for the game, and all eight shares are
placed on that hero.  Twelve Prophecy cards are included in the game,
(Continue reading)


Gmane