"Ingo Althöfer" | 13 Sep 11:44 2014
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codecentric challenge - blog

Hi all,

in October a best-of-5 match will be played between top
German player Franz-Josef Dickhut (6-dan amateur) and
Remi Coulom's CrazyStone. The special thing is that there
will be no handicaps. 

codecentric.de (a small german softmare company) is sponsor
of the event. The have one strong player in their team
(Dr. Raymond Georg Snatzke, 3-dan) who is also running a
blog for the event:
https://blog.codecentric.de/en/2014/09/codecentric-challenge-2014-2/#more-24700

The blog texts exist both in German and in English.
There will be only one column for comments which may
be in any langugage (most feedback you will likely get when
writing in English or German).

Cheers, Ingo.

PS. Georg was my assistant at Jena University from Fall 2000
until 2005. In his doctoral dissertation he has investigated
Combinatorial Game Theory for the modern classic game of Amazons.
Joshua Shriver | 10 Sep 04:28 2014
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CGOS Request Site

Kinda went on a rant.. so wanted to re-iterate.

If you have ANY recommendations.. please let me know!  I follow this
mailing list but this is a direct way to get ahold of me.

Post are emailed to me + sent to my cell phone.

http://cgos.computergo.org/request/

-Josh
jshriver <at> gmail.com
(419) 285-6315 (USA code)
Joshua Shriver | 10 Sep 04:27 2014
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CGOS Donations Thank You

Wanted to be upfront and 100% transparent and THANK YOU.

When I lost my job I reached out to this group, but also my "cough
main group" hense the computer Chess community.

I run the #1 world chess endgame torrent site. Even commericial
engines link and "require me"

I've hosted, hell even have 4 machines online 24/7 RIGHT NOW for chess
authors to run their engines on my OICS (like cgos but for chess)
server.

So here is where I seriously and humbly tip my hat.

I mad both post.. here are the results.

I am a 100% Chess AI guy, but got into Go via Don Dailey and still
working on my own humble engine.

Anyway...out of the donations!   Guess how many Chess ppl donated?
They are the REAL ones who benefit from my servers?  $0

I've been an ass, barely supported CGOS, and honestly feel ashamed of
what CGOS has become compared to what it was on boardspace given my
timesynchole of a job.  But trying to fix that and keep maintaining as
long as I'm alive.

*drum roll* Know how many paypal donations I've received from ppl
here... keep in mind ONLY from this mailing list lol God Bless.

(Continue reading)

Joshua Shriver | 10 Sep 04:15 2014
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CGOS future Pt (3?) solid update

Short story:

I have free time (for real) want to dedicate to CGOS fully.. like
20-40hr a week till solid.  Need help/recommendations.

http://cgos.computergo.org/request/

Long Story:

When I took over the server it was originally meant to for personal
use but Don Dailey asked me to be the new maintainer... how could I
say now... especially since I respect him so much. Mostly for Chess
"komodo" but like him I'm also a Go fan.

Said yes... I have experience, run multiple servers (mainly the
olympuschess.com site, Olympus Internet Chess Server which was
inspired by CGOS but for Chess,  and the egtb torrent site) my lil
non-name to fame.

Anyway I admit in the past I've wanted, tried, but ultimately my
insane job really kept me from holding my end of the stick. 60-80-100+
hrs a week (at 40hr pay cough).

I had it running but only useable.. but no ELO info and web based
presence was sadly a joke.

Even longer story. I have time now and really honestly.. going to
spend some REAL time on CGOS. Not only getting it up to par w/ what
was on boardspace... but a lot of enhancements, including a non TCL
based Qt (Linux/Windows/OS X) based viewer.
(Continue reading)

Nick Wedd | 4 Sep 21:04 2014
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September KGS bot tournament: 19x19, SLOW

The September KGS bot tournament will be start on Sunday September
14th, starting at 22:00 UTC. It will end by 14:00 UTC on Wedbnesday
September 17th.  It will use 19x19 boards, with time limits of almost 
four hours each plus very fast Canadian overtime, and komi of 7.5.
There are details at http://www.gokgs.com/tournInfo.jsp?id=923 .

Please register by emailing me, with the words
"KGS Tournament Registration" in the email title, at
maproom <at> gmail.com .

I am not going to repeat the experiment of replacing the scheduled
eight-round Swiss by double round robin if the numbers are low.
There is too much that can go wrong, including (as last month)
crashing the tournament scheduler so that no KGS tournaments at
all can proceed.

Nick
--

-- 
Nick Wedd
nick <at> maproom.co.uk
Dave Dyer | 2 Sep 19:04 2014
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Re: some general UCT notes.

At 06:18 AM 9/2/2014, Ben Ellis wrote:
>I agree the board-copying should possibly be quicker, but in your case I'd think for the first half of the
game you should starting from an empty board and replay the moves to get to the current position and then
doing the opposite in the second half of the game by undoing the moves. You'd have to approximate what "half
way through the game" is of course :)

Actually, the starting point of a search is always a copy of the main board
(and associated data structures), not one created by replaying moves, but
what you do just once, to start a search, has no effect at all on the
overall performance.
Ben Ellis | 2 Sep 15:18 2014
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Re: some general UCT notes.

I agree the board-copying should possibly be quicker, but in your case I'd think for the first half of the game you should starting from an empty board and replay the moves to get to the current position and then doing the opposite in the second half of the game by undoing the moves. You'd have to approximate what "half way through the game" is of course :)


On Sat, Aug 30, 2014 at 9:10 PM, Dave Dyer <ddyer <at> real-me.net> wrote:

I've recently been upgrading my family of UCT robots for non-go games,
but thought I'd report a few things for "general knowledge and expectations".
This UCT system is written in java, and runs on standard PC hardware with
multiple processor cores.

The system typically uses a fairly small tree and a relatively long random
playout tail, and is not especially optimized for speed. Only the tree-descent
and backtrack-update phases have thread synchronization issues.

I found simple threading had a pretty sharp knee in performance at 4
threads.  In other words, 2 3 and 4 threads improved the overall amount
of work done more or less linearly to 3.5x, speed improvements fell off
rapidly for more threads.

I've also been comparing "blitz" play which creates a copy of the
board at top level, and starts each descent with a copy of the board;
compared with "unwinding" play where every move is explicitly unwound.
Of course, the complexity of the unwinding varies a lot from game to
game, but I found that "unwind" is always faster, an average 1/3 faster
across several games.  So if the complexity of unwinding your data
structures is not too great, it's worthwhile.

_______________________________________________
Computer-go mailing list
Computer-go <at> dvandva.org
http://dvandva.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/computer-go

_______________________________________________
Computer-go mailing list
Computer-go <at> dvandva.org
http://dvandva.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/computer-go
angpoo | 2 Sep 11:47 2014
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need help about KGS bot config

Hello.

I'm Lim Jaebum author of DolBaram.

DolBaram is ranked bot now. But still open free game.

here's my config.
---
room=Computer Go
mode=custom
reconnect=true
undo=false
rules=chinese
rules.boardSize=19
rules.time=1:00+5x0:15
---

Did I miss something?
_______________________________________________
Computer-go mailing list
Computer-go <at> dvandva.org
http://dvandva.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/computer-go
Detlef Schmicker | 31 Aug 11:50 2014
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Probability drift functions

Hi,

I try to find a way to measure the drift of the probability of a node. I
am not looking for a heuristic like compare the last 1000 playouts with
the probability of all playouts but something more general.

I found some articles over "Drift Analysis", which are used in a
different way, but may be converted to this situation.

I found 

arXiv:1011.3466v1 [cs.NE] 15 Nov 2010
Non-Existence of Linear Universal Drift Functions

which from my understanding indicates, that I might be searching for
something impossible, but I did not read into detail for now.

Did somebody already tried this? The idea is, drifting nodes have to
explored in more detail...

Thanks Detlef
Petr Baudis | 31 Aug 09:31 2014
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Re: some general UCT notes.

  Hi!

  Thanks for sharing your observations.

On Sat, Aug 30, 2014 at 01:10:10PM -0700, Dave Dyer wrote:
> I found simple threading had a pretty sharp knee in performance at 4
> threads.  In other words, 2 3 and 4 threads improved the overall amount
> of work done more or less linearly to 3.5x, speed improvements fell off
> rapidly for more threads.

  Do you exclusively lock the tree when working with it, or does Java
allow some tricks to use the traditional lockless tree updates?

> I've also been comparing "blitz" play which creates a copy of the
> board at top level, and starts each descent with a copy of the board;
> compared with "unwinding" play where every move is explicitly unwound.
> Of course, the complexity of the unwinding varies a lot from game to 
> game, but I found that "unwind" is always faster, an average 1/3 faster
> across several games.  So if the complexity of unwinding your data
> structures is not too great, it's worthwhile.

  Couldn't it be the case that your "board" object is just too heavy
weight?  Don't any surprising things hide in the constructors etc.?
What actually takes so much time during the copy operation?

  (Also, in general - what is the relation between number of moves you
make during a playout, number of different board points you visit by the
moves, and size of the board?  If the last is much bigger than the
former two, it may make sense.)

--

-- 
				Petr Baudis
	Life is short, the craft long, opportunity fleeting, experiment
	treacherous, judgment difficult.  -- Hippocrates
Rémi Coulom | 31 Aug 09:13 2014
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Re: some general UCT notes.

On 30 août 2014, at 22:10, Dave Dyer <ddyer <at> real-me.net> wrote:

> I've also been comparing "blitz" play which creates a copy of the
> board at top level, and starts each descent with a copy of the board;
> compared with "unwinding" play where every move is explicitly unwound.
> Of course, the complexity of the unwinding varies a lot from game to 
> game, but I found that "unwind" is always faster, an average 1/3 faster
> across several games.  So if the complexity of unwinding your data
> structures is not too great, it's worthwhile.

Hi Dave,

I am very surprised by this. It is certainly not the case for Go, even on 9x9. Making a copy of the board should
be orders of magnitude faster than running a playout.

Rémi

Gmane