Joe Corneli | 20 Sep 15:41 2011
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regressive image dictionary fontification in emacs

I have ported some support for highlighting words found in the
Regressive Imagery Dictionary
(http://www.kovcomp.co.uk/wordstat/RID.html) into Emacs, code is
available here for use or improvement:

https://github.com/holtzermann17/rid-mode.el

There is no license because the original dictionary doesn't come with
one; hack it at your own risk, I guess.

This software only supplies font-lock support -- it doesn't do
analytics; for the moment, if you want those, you might use

https://github.com/jefftriplett/rid.py --

or try the software-as-service site at 750words.com, which uses RID
and some other similar light-weight text analytic tools.
Richard Stallman | 21 Sep 12:46 2011
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Re: regressive image dictionary fontification in emacs

    https://github.com/holtzermann17/rid-mode.el

    There is no license because the original dictionary doesn't come with
    one; hack it at your own risk, I guess.

If that code does not carry a free license, it is nonfree software.
Please put a GPL notice, as in the Emacs code, on your program
to make it free software and legally compatible with Emacs.

It is unfortunate that the dictionary does not have a free license.
(What is this dictionary?  I never heard of it before.)
But that doesn't mean your program cannot be free.

    or try the software-as-service site at

Please don't promote SaaS sites in this list.
See  http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/who-does-that-server-really-serve.html.

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Joe Corneli | 22 Sep 12:17 2011
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Re: regressive image dictionary fontification in emacs

On Wed, Sep 21, 2011 at 11:46 AM, Richard Stallman <rms <at> gnu.org> wrote:
>    https://github.com/holtzermann17/rid-mode.el
>
>    There is no license because the original dictionary doesn't come with
>    one; hack it at your own risk, I guess.
>
> If that code does not carry a free license, it is nonfree software.

I realise that: for the moment I consider this to be "pirate" software
because it contains a potentially non-free core.  I know you don't
generally like pirate software.  But I don't feel entirely confident
that I can put a license on it since it re-uses wordlists that were
generated by someone else.

If word lists can be considered to be public domain, then I would be
happy to license the creative work I did.  The original author of the
lists is deceased so it would be hard to ask for permission.

I could also write a script that would download the (potentially)
non-free source of the dictionary, then transform it into the source
code, and release my work as free software.  I think people have done
this sort of thing before.

> It is unfortunate that the dictionary does not have a free license.
> (What is this dictionary?  I never heard of it before.)

The dictionary is actually just several lists of words, which are
meant to fall into certain "psychological" categories, e.g. there is a
list of emotion words, there is a list of symbols reminiscent of the
Icarus myth, etc.
(Continue reading)

Ulf Jasper | 22 Sep 20:54 2011
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svg-clock 0.1


This is svg-clock.el, an analog clock which uses Scalable Vector
Graphics for rendering.

Enjoy!
Ulf

Attachment (svg-clock.el): application/emacs-lisp, 8 KiB
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Richard Stallman | 22 Sep 23:44 2011
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Re: regressive image dictionary fontification in emacs

    I realise that: for the moment I consider this to be "pirate" software
    because it contains a potentially non-free core.  I know you don't
    generally like pirate software.

I disapprove generally of attacking ships on the high seas, but it has
nothing to do with software as far as I know.  If you're talking about
an unauthorized copy of a proprietary program, please don't call that
with a slur such as "pirate".  The bad thing about that is that it's
proprietary.  (An authorized copy would be worse.)

    I could also write a script that would download the (potentially)
    non-free source of the dictionary, then transform it into the source
    code, and release my work as free software.

It is doable, but if in practice the USE of this free program would
depend on a specific nonfree wordlist, then it would be trapped (the
way many Java programs formerly used to be trapped before we had a
free Java platform).  Please don't announce trapped programs here.

    The dictionary is actually just several lists of words, which are
    meant to fall into certain "psychological" categories, e.g. there is a
    list of emotion words, there is a list of symbols reminiscent of the
    Icarus myth, etc.

Surely you can make such lists yourself that would serve your purpose.
You can get a public domain old version of Roget's Thesaurus from
Project Gutenberg, select what you want, then add such words as might
occur to you.  It won't be exactly the same, but it could do just as
well.

(Continue reading)

Joe Corneli | 23 Sep 07:11 2011
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Re: regressive image dictionary fontification in emacs

> Surely you can make such lists yourself that would serve your purpose.
> You can get a public domain old version of Roget's Thesaurus from
> Project Gutenberg, select what you want, then add such words as might
> occur to you.  It won't be exactly the same, but it could do just as
> well.

Good idea.  Maybe we could call it the "progressive imagery dictionary".
Ulf Jasper | 26 Sep 21:16 2011
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svg-clock.el 0.2

This is version 0.2 of svg-clock.el, an analog clock which uses Scalable
Vector Graphics for rendering. A fit-to-window option has been added.

svg-clock.el has been added to GNU ELPA and will show up there.

Enjoy!
Ulf

Attachment (svg-clock.el): application/emacs-lisp, 9 KiB
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Kevin Ryde | 27 Sep 02:11 2011
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elisp-docstring-preview.el v.1

This is a couple of lines I use to preview the docstring of a defun,
defvar etc using describe-function etc while editing.  It's good to see
linking and buttonizing, and sometimes check line widths if lot of
escapes.

There's a secret `put' system to dispatch various `deffoo' forms to a
good `describe-foo', though having written it I hardly use it on
anything except defun and defvar.

Note the display is done by an eval-defun of the form at point, so don't
use it on untrusted code ...

Attachment (elisp-docstring-preview.el): application/emacs-lisp, 13 KiB
-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.10 (GNU/Linux)

iD8DBQBNm8bLLFMCIV9q3ToRAjJpAKCwz7U8xRIZeh5KgLX/6kOsNY7fHwCfWeQH
iUVzrSj4GklcDxj5Vgup8a0=
=dd9V
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
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Uwe Brauer | 27 Sep 11:41 2011
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Re: elisp-docstring-preview.el v.1

>> Regarding elisp-docstring-preview.el v.1; Kevin Ryde
>> <user42 <at> zip.com.au> adds: 

   > This is a couple of lines I use to preview the docstring of a defun,
   > defvar etc using describe-function etc while editing.  It's good to see
   > linking and buttonizing, and sometimes check line widths if lot of
   > escapes.

Nice idea, I cannot compile it neither in GNU emacs 23.1 nor
in Xemacs 21.5.29:

elisp-docstring-preview.el:344:1:Warning: the function
    `apropos-describe-plist' is not known to be defined.

Uwe Brauer  
Kevin Ryde | 28 Sep 22:38 2011
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Re: elisp-docstring-preview.el v.1

Uwe Brauer <oub <at> mat.ucm.es> writes:
>
> elisp-docstring-preview.el:344:1:Warning: the function
>     `apropos-describe-plist' is not known to be defined.

As long as it's only a warning it won't matter.
I forget why I didn't just (eval-and-compile (require 'apropos)).
Some good reason no doubt ... :)

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