Robert D. Crawford | 5 Nov 16:24 2011
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issues with the latest svn

Hello all,

I just updated my installation to 34.0 rev. 7364 from an old svn version
33.0 rev. 7018.  I have noticed a few issues.

1.  (emacspeak-play-emacspeak-startup-icon is not being honored.  I have
it set to nil and it still plays.  Prior to upgrading I did not have it
set at all and it did not play.

2.  Speech is garbled on startup.  It sounds like the speech rate for
outloud is set to something over 200.  I have 3 places where rate occurs
in my .emacs file, 1 to set the espeak default speech rate to 300, 1 to
set the outloud default speech rate to 100, and one at the end of the
file that explicitly runs (dtk-set-rate 100 4).  The last one fixes the
problem of the garbled speech.

3.  At some point in the distant past I had included the command
tts-restart at the end of my .emacs file.  I find this is no longer
necessary.  I don't even now remember what it was there for but I needed
it to fix another issue.

Is anyone else seeing these problems?

Best regards,
rdc

--

-- 
Robert D. Crawford                                     robdcraw <at> gmail.com

(Continue reading)

Robert D. Crawford | 11 Nov 01:38 2011
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accessible search

Hello all,

A while before I upgraded my emacspeak installation I got a message when
trying to use google accessible search (C-e ? a) that it required
javascript.  I gave up on it.  Then, after I updated it started working
again.  Happy days.  Now, today, it gives me the javascript required
page again.  Has anyone else seen this and is there some sort of
workaround?  Is everyone using linearize-tables on google's redesigned
results?

Thanks for any advice,
rdc
--

-- 
Robert D. Crawford                                     robdcraw <at> gmail.com

Steve Holmes | 11 Nov 23:48 2011

Re: accessible search

I've only used google search recently with Firefox in Windows or
Linux.  I used elinks in the past but that was before the redesign of
google and the autocompletion crap.  I think because of the auto
completion stuff, javascript has probably got to be all over the
place.  When I do pull up result pages - even with the newest format,
I usually use the structural navigation keys like 'h' to jump from one
search to the next.  That's why I like using Firefox instead of the
text browsers.

One other note: I didn't know google was tabling any of the results
but in general, I never use linearization of links or tables.  I much
prefer to be able to navigate around inside browser tables with the
table navigation keys, once again, in graphical browsers only.

On 11/10/11, Robert D. Crawford <robdcraw <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> Hello all,
>
> A while before I upgraded my emacspeak installation I got a message when
> trying to use google accessible search (C-e ? a) that it required
> javascript.  I gave up on it.  Then, after I updated it started working
> again.  Happy days.  Now, today, it gives me the javascript required
> page again.  Has anyone else seen this and is there some sort of
> workaround?  Is everyone using linearize-tables on google's redesigned
> results?
>
> Thanks for any advice,
> rdc
> --
> Robert D. Crawford                                     robdcraw <at> gmail.com
>
(Continue reading)

T. V. Raman | 12 Nov 04:34 2011
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accessible search

Update from svn again, the emacspeak template was missing a
nojs=1 query param. 

--

-- 
Best Regards,
--raman

Robert D. Crawford | 12 Nov 14:56 2011
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Re: accessible search

"T. V. Raman" <tv.raman.tv <at> gmail.com> writes:

> Update from svn again, the emacspeak template was missing a
> nojs=1 query param.

Many thanks.  This update also seems to have fixed the garbled speech
issue.  I still heard the emacspeak.mp3 sound at startup.  Not a big
deal, though.  As concerns speech, I have to explicitly set the default
speech rate outside of customize to get it to take effect.  If not set
like so:

(dtk-set-rate 100 4)

The speech at startup is very slow.  Maybe 50.  If I check the value of
the outloud-default-speech-rate it is 100.  Restarting the server does
not seem to make the speech rate take effect, only resetting it via C-u
C-e d r.  After setting it in this fashion, resetting it via C-e C-s
keeps the value and rate.

Best,
rdc
--

-- 
Robert D. Crawford                                     robdcraw <at> gmail.com

T. V. Raman | 12 Nov 17:26 2011
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Re: accessible search


Set your desired rate via custom. I've tested the current build
against both dectalk and outloud and it starts up correctly in my
environment.

Same with startup sound, look at the code -- it definitely does
not ignore the custom setting. Check your emacs environment to
make sure you're not missing something you've set.

>>>>> "Robert" == Robert D Crawford <robdcraw <at> gmail.com> writes:
    Robert> "T. V. Raman" <tv.raman.tv <at> gmail.com> writes:
    >> Update from svn again, the emacspeak template was missing
    >> a nojs=1 query param.
    Robert> 
    Robert> Many thanks. This update also seems to have fixed the
    Robert> garbled speech issue. I still heard the emacspeak.mp3
    Robert> sound at startup. Not a big deal, though. As concerns
    Robert> speech, I have to explicitly set the default speech
    Robert> rate outside of customize to get it to take
    Robert> effect. If not set like so:
    Robert> 
    Robert> (dtk-set-rate 100 4)
    Robert> 
    Robert> The speech at startup is very slow. Maybe 50. If I
    Robert> check the value of the outloud-default-speech-rate it
    Robert> is 100. Restarting the server does not seem to make
    Robert> the speech rate take effect, only resetting it via
    Robert> C-u C-e d r. After setting it in this fashion,
    Robert> resetting it via C-e C-s keeps the value and rate.
    Robert> 
(Continue reading)

Robert D. Crawford | 13 Nov 14:28 2011
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Re: accessible search

"T. V. Raman" <tv.raman.tv <at> gmail.com> writes:

> Set your desired rate via custom. I've tested the current build
> against both dectalk and outloud and it starts up correctly in my
> environment.

I created a new init file with only the following lines:

(load-file  "/usr/local/share/emacs/site-lisp/emacspeak/lisp/emacspeak-setup.el")
(setq outloud-default-speech-rate 100)

and started emacs with:

emacs -q -load ~/.emacs.test &

And it still comes up with a speech rate of 50.  No matter what the
value of the variable outloud-default-speech-rate is.

If I am the only one seeing this it must be something here that has
changed.  If I am the only one seeing it then spending time figuring it
out is not really well-spent.  I'll work on it a bit as I can and if I
figure something out I'll post.

Best regards,
rdc

--

-- 
Robert D. Crawford                                     robdcraw <at> gmail.com

(Continue reading)

T. V. Raman | 23 Nov 18:29 2011
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Emacspeak 35.0 (HEAdDog) Unleashed


*               Emacspeak-35.0 (HeadDog) Unleashed!

**  For Immediate Release:

San Jose, Calif., (November 23, 2011)
    Emacspeak:  Redefining Accessibility In The Era Of Cloud Computing
    --Zero cost of upgrades/downgrades makes priceless software affordable!

Emacspeak Inc (NASDOG: ESPK) --http://emacspeak.sf.net--
announces the immediate world-wide availability of Emacspeak
35.0 (HeadDog) --a powerful audio desktop for leveraging today's evolving
data, social and service-oriented  Web cloud.

** Investors Note:

With several prominent tweeters expanding coverage of
_#emacspeak_, NASDOG: ESPK has now been consistently trading over
the net at levels close to that once attained by DogCom
high-fliers—and as of October 2009 is trading at levels close to
that achieved by once better known stocks in the tech sector.

** What Is It?

Emacspeak is a fully functional audio desktop that provides
complete eyes-free access to all major 32 and 64 bit operating
environments. By seamlessly blending live access to all aspects
of the Internet such as Web-surfing, blogging, social computing
and electronic messaging into the audio desktop, Emacspeak
enables speech access to local and remote information with a
(Continue reading)

T. V. Raman | 23 Nov 18:33 2011
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[EMACSPEAK The Complete Audio Desktop] Emacspeak 35.0 (HeadDog) Released

Emacspeak 35.0—HeadDog—Unleashed!

1 Emacspeak-35.0 (HeadDog) Unleashed!

1.1 For Immediate Release:

San Jose, Calif., (November 23, 2011) Emacspeak: Redefining Accessibility In The Era Of Cloud Computing –Zero cost of upgrades/downgrades makes priceless software affordable!

Emacspeak Inc (NASDOG: ESPK) --http://emacspeak.sf.net-- announces the immediate world-wide availability of Emacspeak 35.0 (HeadDog) –a powerful audio desktop for leveraging today's evolving data, social and service-oriented Web cloud.

1.2 Investors Note:

With several prominent tweeters expanding coverage of #emacspeak, NASDOG: ESPK has now been consistently trading over the net at levels close to that once attained by DogCom high-fliers—and as of October 2009 is trading at levels close to that achieved by once better known stocks in the tech sector.

1.3 What Is It?

Emacspeak is a fully functional audio desktop that provides complete eyes-free access to all major 32 and 64 bit operating environments. By seamlessly blending live access to all aspects of the Internet such as Web-surfing, blogging, social computing and electronic messaging into the audio desktop, Emacspeak enables speech access to local and remote information with a consistent and well-integrated user interface. A rich suite of task-oriented tools provides efficient speech-enabled access to the evolving service-oriented social Web cloud.

1.4 Major Enhancements:

emacspeak-websearch.elImproved search wizards including efficient Google search. emacspeak-epub.elPreliminary EPub support. emacspeak-magit.elSupport for git interaction. emacspeak-pianobar.elPandora radio for the Emacspeak desktop. emacspeak-dbus.elDBus integration to receive network notifications. emacspeak-woman.elSpeech-enable Emacs' built-in Man page interface. Emacspeak-npr.elAPI client for NPR interaction. emacspeak-librivox.elAPI Client For Free Audio Books from Librivox. emacspeak-url-templatesUpdated URL templates for efficient Web interaction. emacspeak-bookshare.elBookshare API Client Updated Bookshare client. servers/macSupport For Mac TTS Emacs 24 SupportUpdated support for the forthcoming Emacs 24 release.

Plus many more changes too numerous to fit in this margin 󠇿… ∞

1.5 Establishing Liberty, Equality And Freedom:

Never a toy system, Emacspeak is voluntarily bundled with all major Linux distributions. Though designed to be modular, distributors have freely chosen to bundle the fully integrated system without any undue pressure—a documented success for the integrated innovation embodied by Emacspeak. As the system evolves, both upgrades and downgrades continue to be available at the same zero-cost to all users. The integrity of the Emacspeak codebase is ensured by the reliable and secure Linux platform used to develop and distribute the software.

Extensive studies have shown that thanks to these features, users consider Emacspeak to be absolutely priceless. Thanks to this wide-spread user demand, the present version remains priceless as ever—it is being made available at the same zero-cost as previous releases.

At the same time, Emacspeak continues to innovate in the area of eyes-free social interaction and carries forward the well-established Open Source tradition of introducing user interface features that eventually show up in luser environments.

On this theme, when once challenged by a proponent of a crash-prone but well-marketed mousetrap with the assertion "Emacs is a system from the 70's", the creator of Emacspeak evinced surprise at the unusual candor manifest in the assertion that it would take popular idiot-proven interfaces until the year 2070 to catch up to where the Emacspeak audio desktop is today. Industry experts welcomed this refreshing breath of Courage Certainty and Clarity (CCC) at a time when users are reeling from the Fear Uncertainty and Doubt (FUD) unleashed by complex software systems backed by even more convoluted press releases.

1.6 Independent Test Results:

Independent test results have proven that unlike some modern (and not so modern) software, Emacspeak can be safely uninstalled without adversely affecting the continued performance of the computer. These same tests also revealed that once uninstalled, the user stopped functioning altogether. Speaking with Aster Labrador, the creator of Emacspeak once pointed out that these results re-emphasize the user-centric design of Emacspeak; "It is the user –and not the computer– that stops functioning when Emacspeak is uninstalled!".

1.6.1 Note from Aster,Bubbles and Tilden:

UnDoctored Videos Inc. is looking for volunteers to star in a video demonstrating such complete user failure.

1.7 Obtaining Emacspeak:

Emacspeak can be downloaded from Google Code Hosting –see http://code.google.com/p/emacspeak/ You can visit Emacspeak on the WWW at http://emacspeak.sf.net. You can subscribe to the emacspeak mailing list emacspeak <at> cs.vassar.edu by sending mail to the list request address emacspeak-request <at> cs.vassar.edu. The HeadDog release is at http://emacspeak.googlecode.com/files/emacspeak-34.0.tar.bz2. The latest development snapshot of Emacspeak is available via Subversion from Google Code Hosting at http://emacspeak.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/

1.8 History:

Emacspeak 35.0 is all about teaching a new dog old tricks — and is aptly code-named HeadDog in honor of our new Press/Analyst contact. emacspeak-34.0 (AKA Bubbles) established a new beach-head with respect to rapid task completion in an eyes-free environment. Emacspeak-33.0 AKA StarDog brings unparalleled cloud access to the audio desktop. Emacspeak 32.0 AKA LuckyDog continues to innovate via open technologies for better access. Emacspeak 31.0 AKA TweetDog — adds tweeting to the Emacspeak desktop. Emacspeak 30.0 AKA SocialDog brings the Social Web to the audio desktop—you cant but be social if you speak! Emacspeak 29.0—AKAAbleDog—is a testament to the resilliance and innovation embodied by Open Source software—it would not exist without the thriving Emacs community that continues to ensure that Emacs remains one of the premier user environments despite perhaps also being one of the oldest. Emacspeak 28.0—AKA PuppyDog—exemplifies the rapid pace of development evinced by Open Source software. Emacspeak 27.0—AKA FastDog—is the latest in a sequence of upgrades that make previous releases obsolete and downgrades unnecessary. Emacspeak 26—AKA LeadDog—continues the tradition of introducing innovative access solutions that are unfettered by the constraints inherent in traditional adaptive technologies. Emacspeak 25 —AKA ActiveDog —re-activates open, unfettered access to online information. Emacspeak-Alive —AKA LiveDog —enlivens open, unfettered information access with a series of live updates that once again demonstrate the power and agility of open source software development. Emacspeak 23.0 -- AKA Retriever—went the extra mile in fetching full access. Emacspeak 22.0 —AKA GuideDog —helps users navigate the Web more effectively than ever before. Emacspeak 21.0 —AKA PlayDog —continued the Emacspeak tradition of relying on enhanced productivity to liberate users. Emacspeak-20.0 —AKA LeapDog —continues the long established GNU/Emacs tradition of integrated innovation to create a pleasurable computing environment for eyes-free interaction. emacspeak-19.0 –AKA WorkDog– is designed to enhance user productivity at work and leisure. Emacspeak-18.0 –code named GoodDog– continued the Emacspeak tradition of enhancing user productivity and thereby reducing total cost of ownership. Emacspeak-17.0 –code named HappyDog– enhances user productivity by exploiting today's evolving WWW standards. Emacspeak-16.0 –code named CleverDog– the follow-up to SmartDog– continued the tradition of working better, faster, smarter. Emacspeak-15.0 –code named SmartDog–followed up on TopDog as the next in a continuing a series of award-winning audio desktop releases from Emacspeak Inc. Emacspeak-14.0 –code named TopDog–was the first release of this millennium. Emacspeak-13.0 –codenamed YellowLab– was the closing release of the 20th. century. Emacspeak-12.0 –code named HeadDog– began leveraging the evolving semantic WWW to provide task-oriented speech access to Webformation. Emacspeak-11.0 –code named Aster– went the final step in making Linux a zero-cost Internet access solution for blind and visually impaired users. Emacspeak-10.0 –(AKA Emacspeak-2000) code named WonderDog– continued the tradition of award-winning software releases designed to make eyes-free computing a productive and pleasurable experience. Emacspeak-9.0 –(AKA Emacspeak 99) code named BlackLab– continued to innovate in the areas of speech interaction and interactive accessibility. Emacspeak-8.0 –(AKA Emacspeak-98++) code named BlackDog– was a major upgrade to the speech output extension to Emacs.

Emacspeak-95 (code named Illinois) was released as OpenSource on the Internet in May 1995 as the first complete speech interface to UNIX workstations. The subsequent release, Emacspeak-96 (code named Egypt) made available in May 1996 provided significant enhancements to the interface. Emacspeak-97 (Tennessee) went further in providing a true audio desktop. Emacspeak-98 integrated Internetworking into all aspects of the audio desktop to provide the first fully interactive speech-enabled WebTop.

About Emacspeak:

Originally based at Cornell (NY) http://www.cs.cornell.edu/home/raman –home to Auditory User Interfaces (AUI) on the WWW– Emacspeak is now maintained on GoogleCode --http://code.google.com/p/emacspeak —and Sourceforge —http://emacspeak.sf.net. The system is mirrored world-wide by an international network of software archives and bundled voluntarily with all major Linux distributions. On Monday, April 12, 1999, Emacspeak became part of the Smithsonian's Permanent Research Collection on Information Technology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History.

The Emacspeak mailing list is archived at Vassar –the home of the Emacspeak mailing list– thanks to Greg Priest-Dorman, and provides a valuable knowledge base for new users.

2 Press/Analyst Contact: Tilden Labrador

Going forward, Tilden acknowledges his exclusive monopoly on setting the direction of the Emacspeak Audio Desktop, and promises to exercise this freedom to innovate and her resulting power responsibly (as before) in the interest of all dogs.

**About This Release:

Windows-Free (WF) is a favorite battle-cry of The League Against Forced Fenestration (LAFF). –see http://www.usdoj.gov/atr/cases/f3800/msjudgex.htm for details on the ill-effects of Forced Fenestration.

CopyWrite )C( Aster and Hubbell Labrador. All Writes Reserved. HeadDog (DM), LiveDog (DM), HeadDog (DM), BlackDog (DM) etc., are Registered Dogmarks of Aster, Hubbell and Tilden Labrador. All other dogs belong to their respective owners.

Date: 2011-11-23 08:44:19 PST

Author: T.V Raman

Org version 7.7 with Emacs version 24

Validate XHTML 1.0


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Posted By T. V. Raman to EMACSPEAK The Complete Audio Desktop at 11/23/2011 09:33:00 AM
Tyler Spivey | 23 Nov 21:08 2011
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c-u c-e d r broken with outloud

Testing with latest SVN last night and now emacspeak 35, it seems like
this broke somewhere.
Going from a default emacs 23/emacspeak 35 with no changes,
If I press c-u c-e d r 120, the rate doesn't change. C-e d r 120 works fine.
Looking at the code, it looks like a prefix arg to dtk-set-rate sets
tts-default-speech-rate and dtk-speech-rate. It then calls
tts-configure-synthesis-setup, which then calls outloud-configure tts to
reset both back to their defaults.


Gmane