Mary Beth Faccioli | 1 Apr 01:34 2011
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Re: Upgrading staff technology skills

Hi there,
In addition to being a web developer and subscriber to Lynda.com for about 15 years now, I am also a trainer. 
While I LOVE Lynda.com, I think you'll need to do at least some work with staff to help them tie what they
learn about whatever-software-package to services.  Most of the tutorials on Lynda.com are for specific
software.  There's a big leap from there to improved public library customer service.  What are the
services that need improving, and how will the tutorials help improve them?  This is important to flesh out
in advance, and then allocate the resources beyond a Lynda.com subscription to help staff make the link to services.

In terms of tech competencies, you might check out the Library Support Staff Certification technology
competencies - http://ala-apa.org/lssc/for-candidates/competency-sets/technology/ and the
WebJunction Competency Index for the Library Field, which includes technology -
http://www.webjunction.org/competencies/-/articles/content/67024491.  These might be decent
guides to help you start defining competencies for your own staff.  I'm sure there are public libraries
that would be willing to share competencies they've developed, but I'm guessing a lot of those folks
aren't on this list (because they are trainers/continuing ed folk).  

You may want to contact the Oklahoma State Library - they have someone who works with continuing education -
and see what resources and advice they may have available re staff tech training.  There may be something
statewide you can hook into.

Hope this helps!

Mary Beth Faccioli, MLIS
Instructional Design and Technology Consultant
Colorado State Library

--- On Thu, 3/31/11, Thomas Edelblute <TEdelblute@...> wrote:

> From: Thomas Edelblute <TEdelblute@...>
> Subject: Re: [Web4lib] Upgrading staff technology skills
(Continue reading)

Bret Parker | 1 Apr 18:32 2011
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Re: Systems Management

Jane,
Here are some comments for your benefit, shared by a workplace colleague of mine for you and the list.

Mike Migliori writes:

We use both the KACE - Kbox Appliances

1.  KBOX2100  -  OS Deployment
(PXE boot to the server, never need to look for a USB key or CDS)
- we use scripted installs
- we upload images (backup or transfers)
- We upload images that are sysprep'd (New deployments or redeploys)
- We capture user states and migrate them to new equipment

2.  KBOX1100 -  Software Management and deployment
-  Manage 1,600 machines
-  We have over 217 applications that we distribute (automated installation) via kbox
    -  Software is installed the same every time.
-  Easily create reports for inventory
-  Push out short-cuts to desktops

3.  Remote Control
Even though you can click links to remote using VNC  from the browser, viewer or RDP, we opted to purchase
Bomgar's B200 series remote appliance.  It also has a command that will integrate with KBOX.
www.bomgar.com 

Finally,  because of staffing issues and consolidation, over the last 3 years we have lost 4 support
positions, 1 network position, and consolidated our library equipment which added another 325 machines
to manage.

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Davis, Andrea (CIV | 1 Apr 18:41 2011

Re: Upgrading staff technology skills

Another library-focused technology skills resource is SLA's 23 Things project: wiki.sla.org/display/23Things
Which has a 10 week do-it-at-your-own-pace introduction to social networking, multimedia, and web 2.0
tools. 

Andrea N. Davis
Reference & Instruction Librarian
Dudley Knox Library, Naval Postgraduate School
411 Dyer Road, Monterey, CA 93943 
andavis@... | 831.656.2809

To contact Research Assistance use the Ask a Librarian Quick Link on our web site.
New!  Use your phone to text message (SMS) your question.  Send your message to 66746 and start your
question with the keyword npslib.  More information.

-----Original Message-----
From: web4lib-bounces@...
[mailto:web4lib-bounces <at> webjunction.org] On Behalf Of web4lib-request@...
Sent: Friday, April 01, 2011 9:00 AM
To: web4lib@...
Subject: Web4lib Digest, Vol 73, Issue 1

Send Web4lib mailing list submissions to
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Jim Knutson | 1 Apr 18:51 2011
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BTCTA bibs

Is this an acceptable listserv to raise copy-cataloging issues/questions?

"Double DLC" and UKM and NLM are almost always very nice MARC records. I'm 
finding the ones generated by BTCTA not so hot, which is not good, since 
Baker & Taylor has this demand imposed on some libraries, now -- you buy 
from us, you take 'em shelf-ready, and we'll send you their MARC records.

I have a hunch web4lib is a higher-level listserv, and such questions are of 
no interest, but, still, I thought I'd run it by you.

Tnx,
Jim Knutson
copy cataloging at an Oregon community college
HAZEL Margaret E | 1 Apr 19:37 2011
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Re: Upgrading staff technology skills

We are in the midst of developing our "Skills needed for success" for staff, which starts with Core Tech
Skills needed by all staff, and then is being developed in workgroups for the various job groupings.  We are
emphasizing that this is an opportunity to improve people's comfort with tech skills we believe they need
for efficient job performance.  We are starting with self-assessments, and then arranging training -
hopefully mostly in "found" 5-minute-chunk online trainings, but in physical group settings if
assessment shows the need - after which the skills will become expectations which will go into their
annual evaluations.  I hope to integrate it with the City online training system, which can track
achievements and task completions for us.

I am actually hoping that this will become a model for our City organization, as it seems that this kind of
basic training and setting of expectations is sorely lacking in many areas.  There is also a great deal of
assumption of skill, especially for younger hires, which is simply wrong.

-Margaret

Margaret Hazel
Virtual Branch & Innovative Tech Manager
Eugene Public Library
Eugene, OR
541-682-6015 
margaret.e.hazel@...

-----Original Message-----
From: web4lib-bounces@...
[mailto:web4lib-bounces <at> webjunction.org] On Behalf Of Terran McCanna
Sent: Thursday, March 31, 2011 11:45 AM
To: web4lib@...
Subject: Re: [Web4lib] Upgrading staff technology skills

This is something we desperately need to do at my system as well, but we have 
(Continue reading)

Coral Sheldon-Hess | 1 Apr 21:36 2011

Re: BTCTA bibs

Hi, Jim!

There may be people here who know about that. (Not me, sadly--I'm not
much of a cataloger. :)) If not, though, I definitely recommend
AUTOCAT. http://listserv.syr.edu/scripts/wa.exe?SUBED1=AUTOCAT&A=1

It's high-traffic, but full of great cataloging-related content.

--
Coral Sheldon-Hess | UAA/APU Consortium Library | Web Services Librarian
http://sheldon-hess.org/coral |  <at> web_librarian | skype: artificialinanity

On Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 8:51 AM, Jim Knutson <tintin@...> wrote:
> Is this an acceptable listserv to raise copy-cataloging issues/questions?
>
> "Double DLC" and UKM and NLM are almost always very nice MARC records. I'm
> finding the ones generated by BTCTA not so hot, which is not good, since
> Baker & Taylor has this demand imposed on some libraries, now -- you buy
> from us, you take 'em shelf-ready, and we'll send you their MARC records.
>
> I have a hunch web4lib is a higher-level listserv, and such questions are of
> no interest, but, still, I thought I'd run it by you.
>
>
> Tnx,
> Jim Knutson
> copy cataloging at an Oregon community college
>
>
>
(Continue reading)

Jim Knutson | 1 Apr 22:27 2011
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Re: BTCTA bibs

Okay. I've gone out and subscribed to the Autocat and OCLC cat listservs.

Web4lib comes through!

Tnx.

JK

RE:

From: "Jim Knutson" <tintin@...>
To: <web4lib@...>
Sent: Friday, April 01, 2011 9:51 AM
Subject: [Web4lib] BTCTA bibs

> Is this an acceptable listserv to raise copy-cataloging issues/questions?
>
> "Double DLC" and UKM and NLM are almost always very nice MARC records. I'm 
> finding the ones generated by BTCTA not so hot, which is not good, since 
> Baker & Taylor has this demand imposed on some libraries, now -- you buy 
> from us, you take 'em shelf-ready, and we'll send you their MARC records.
>
> I have a hunch web4lib is a higher-level listserv, and such questions are 
> of no interest, but, still, I thought I'd run it by you.
>
>
> Tnx,
> Jim Knutson
> copy cataloging at an Oregon community college
>
(Continue reading)

Adams, Jason | 2 Apr 01:59 2011
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Library Website Privacy Policies

Our Web Team put together a nice 2-page privacy policy -- very similar
to what you see on most library websites.  When our Policy Review Team
revised it, our privacy policy was reduced to two sentences sandwiched
between a statement from the ALA Code of Ethics ("We protect each
library user's right to privacy...") and a statement about the PATRIOT
Act ("The Library System complies with the law as it relates to the
U.S.A. P.A.T.R.I.O.T. Act...").

It's my understanding that it is "proper" standard practice for website
privacy policies to detail a website's information-gathering practices,
including a description of why we collect data, what we collect, and
what we do with it.  I've seen this mentioned by the Electronic Frontier
Foundation, Federal Trade Commission, and the American Library
Association (in their document "Guidelines For Developing a Library
Privacy Policy").

What are your suggestions for helping our less web-savvy library system
decision-makers to understand the importance of a more descriptive
privacy policy for our library website?  Any links to related articles,
other library privacy policies, and statements by the EFF, FTC, ALA,
library lawyers, etc. would also be helpful.

Thanks in advance for your replies!

Jason Adams, Library Assistant II
Robert Balliot | 2 Apr 04:49 2011
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Re: Library Website Privacy Policies

This is an interesting problem.  The way that I understand the law is that
States can offer more constitutional protections than the Federal
government, but not less.  So, you have the Nevada law which reads:

 Nevada Chapter 239 Public
Records<http://www.leg.state.nv.us/Division/Legal/LawLibrary/NRS/NRS-239.html#NRS239Sec013>
:

*NRS 239.013  Confidentiality of records of library which identify user with
property used.  *Any records of a public library or other library which
contain the identity of a user and the books, documents, films, recordings
or other property of the library which were used are confidential and not
public books or records within the meaning of NRS
239.010<http://www.leg.state.nv.us/Division/Legal/LawLibrary/NRS/NRS-239.html#NRS239Sec010>.
Such records may be disclosed only in response to an order issued by a court
upon a finding that the disclosure of such records is necessary to protect
the public safety or to prosecute a crime.   (Added to NRS by 1981, 182)

That seems like a pretty strong case for privacy in Nevada. In my mind,
those confidential records would include anything being done on a library
computer.  But, the Children's Internet Protection Act (based on the power
of withholding funds) and the various iterations of the Patriot Act and FISA
end up modifying Constitutional protections by changing the historic
parameters of probable cause and somewhat redefining due process through
National Security Letters.  I imagine that there may be some case law at
this point that has tested the provisions of the Patriot Act that a
qualified attorney could definitively apply to both Nevada law and Federal
law.

The ALA code of ethics only has the power of a well-reasoned authoritative
(Continue reading)

Adams, Jason | 2 Apr 23:21 2011
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Re: Library Website Privacy Policies

It seems that a general policy should be simply stated, but the actual
explicit process used to provide privacy should be a public record that
is changeable and updated and available on demand.

I believe that's where they were coming from when they "pared down
considerably" (in their own words) our privacy policy and suggested a
FAQ section that could "be changed with changing technologies, without
changing the policy."

If you provide a policy that is perceived as an obligation to your
public / patrons then the less you say without trying to rewrite the law
may provide the least amount of institutional liability.

And I believe this, too, is why they believe the privacy policy should
"be succinct."

However, with both of the above points being said, it is my
understanding (per the Federal Trade Commission and the Electronic
Frontier Foundation - and even ALA) that a website privacy policy should
describe what we do with the data we collect from our visitors.  Is it
not standard practice to have a website privacy policy that does so?
Cannot we still do this and have a privacy policy that doesn't need
updates and revisions for the next several years?  The ALA's privacy
policy is 8-years old tomorrow, and it still stands as relevant as it
did in 2003 (cf. http://www.ala.org/ala/home/privacystatement.cfm).

In addition, I don't believe statements like the following would either
create a greater liability for our library or a greater obligation to
our patrons:

(Continue reading)


Gmane