Helen L | 2 Jun 00:42 2010
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NETSL Executive Board Wants You! Call for Nominations

The New England Technical Services
Librarians<http://www.nelib.org/netsl/index.htm>(NETSL) Executive
Board is committed to promoting and supporting technical
services activities in New England. Board members plan and present the
annual NETSL Spring
Conference<http://www.nelib.org/netsl/conference/2010/index.htm>.
The Board also develops programs for the New England Library Association
(NELA) Annual Conference <http://www.nelib.org/conference/2010/>, presents
the annual NETSL Award for Excellence in Technical
Services<http://www.nelib.org/netsl/award.htm>,
and promotes technical services throughout New England and beyond through
partnerships with other similar organizations.

Each year NETSL holds elections to fill open positions on the Board. If you
are enthusiastic about innovations in technical services, are interested in
contributing to regional technical services programming, and would like to
have direct input into the direction of NETSL as an organization, consider
running for a position on the NETSL Executive Board. Candidates must be
NETSL members (via membership in
NELA<http://www.nelib.org/membership/regformstep1.htm>)
to serve on the board.

The following positions on NETSL's 2010-2011 Executive Board are open:

* Corresponding Secretary (one-year term)

* Recording Secretary (one-year term)

* Treasurer (one-year term)

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Chester D. Mealer | 2 Jun 16:05 2010

Re: staff training videos

Thomas,

I know with Camtasia you can create a flash video which at the end will send them to a url of your choice (the
survey), but if you're going to have something like that it might be better to have it set up where they can
either go to the survey or replay the video in case they wanted to review part of it first. Alternately I
would just put the survey on the page below the video, with a message above asking them to fill out the survey
when they have finished viewing.

Chester Mealer
Webmaster
Rapides Parish Library
chester@...
318-448-8125 x 216

-----Original Message-----
From: web4lib-bounces@...
[mailto:web4lib-bounces@...] On Behalf Of Thomas Edelblute
Sent: Saturday, May 29, 2010 11:52 AM
To: Web4Lib (web4lib@...)
Subject: [Web4lib] staff training videos

We have created a few staff training videos involving printer troubleshooting and Excel use.  They are
stored on a server at the Central Library, and are in WVM format for viewing in Windows Media Player with
links to them on our intranet.  What is being asked is a mechanism for me to keep track of who has seen which
videos and get some feedback from them.  Is there a way of getting a web browser popup window to display when
the video is finished that the staff member can fill out?  If so, how would I go about doing that?

Thomas Edelblute
Public Access Systems Coordinator
Anaheim Public Library
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Cynthia Hodgson | 2 Jun 16:16 2010

UKSG and NISO announce first endorsers of KBART Recommended Practice

New KBART Phase II Working Group and Co-Chairs Also Revealed

June 1, 2010 - Baltimore, MD and Newbury, UK - UKSG and NISO are pleased to
announce that the American Institute of Physics, Ex Libris, Serials
Solutions and OCLC are the first organizations to publicly endorse the Phase
I recommendations of the KBART (Knowledge Bases And Related Tools) Working
Group, a joint initiative that is exploring data problems within the OpenURL
supply chain. KBART's Phase I Recommended Practice (NISO RP-9-2010),
published in January 2010, contains practical recommendations for the timely
exchange of accurate metadata between content providers and knowledge base
developers. A number of other major organizations in the scholarly
information supply chain are also working towards KBART endorsement.

All content providers, from major databases to small publishers, are
encouraged to publicly endorse the KBART Recommended Practice by submitting
a sample file to the KBART working group. Once the file's format and content
has been reviewed and approved, and the provider has made it publicly
available (in line with the recommendations), the provider will be added to
a public list of endorsing providers. Knowledge base developers can endorse
the KBART Recommended Practice by confirming that their systems can process
KBART formatted files. In addition, a contacts registry is now available on
the KBART Information Hub at http://www.uksg.org/kbart or
http://www.niso.org/workrooms/kbart where content providers and knowledge
base developers can register their organization's information for
downloading holdings metadata. 

Sarah Pearson, KBART co-chair and E-Resources & Serials Coordinator at the
University of Birmingham, comments: "It's an indication of the importance of
KBART's work, and the ease with which the Recommended Practice can be
adopted, that major knowledge base vendors - such as Serials Solutions in
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Stephanie Zimmerman | 2 Jun 22:35 2010
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"Homemade" Catalog

Hi,

(Please excuse cross-postings)

One of my coworkers was awarded a grant and is required to organize a small
library at a local Youth Intervention Center.  Here's what she is asking...

"As part of the grant we’re receiving from United Way, we’ve agreed to
organize the YIC library.  We were hoping to create documentation of
everything the YIC owns.  Rather than enter this into a spreadsheet on our
own, we were wondering what kind of free library software is out there…  I
have heard of some for MAC that are not free, like Monster Delicious – where
you use the iSight to scan ISBN and it loads all the information (title,
author, publication, etc.) into a program that looks much like iTunes.  Do
you know of anything free for a PC that we could do something similar, but
with a normal scanner like we use for checking out library books?  Like
perhaps we could scan ISBN’s and it would bring up all the information into
a program?  We would use this information to make quality book purchases for
the future – by seeing what topics we need more of and so on…"

I did some research on Library Thing but don't see a way to scan the books
in which would save a lot of time.  Does anyone know of any free or low cost
way to do such a thing?

Thanks for your time!
Sincerely,

Stephanie Zimmerman
Training Coordinator
Library System of Lancaster County
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Sharon Foster | 2 Jun 22:40 2010
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Re: [Publib] "Homemade" Catalog

LibraryThing was my first thought, and it will accept ISBNs. LT has
organized several cataloging blitzes for organizations like the one
you describe.

Sharon M. Foster, JD, MLS
Technology Librarian
http://firstgentrekkie.blogspot.com/
"Have you tried switching it off and on again?"

On Wed, Jun 2, 2010 at 4:35 PM, Stephanie Zimmerman
<slzimm1@...> wrote:
> Hi,
>
> (Please excuse cross-postings)
>
> One of my coworkers was awarded a grant and is required to organize a small
> library at a local Youth Intervention Center.  Here's what she is asking...
>
> "As part of the grant we’re receiving from United Way, we’ve agreed to
> organize the YIC library.  We were hoping to create documentation of
> everything the YIC owns.  Rather than enter this into a spreadsheet on our
> own, we were wondering what kind of free library software is out there…  I
> have heard of some for MAC that are not free, like Monster Delicious – where
> you use the iSight to scan ISBN and it loads all the information (title,
> author, publication, etc.) into a program that looks much like iTunes.  Do
> you know of anything free for a PC that we could do something similar, but
> with a normal scanner like we use for checking out library books?  Like
> perhaps we could scan ISBN’s and it would bring up all the information into
> a program?  We would use this information to make quality book purchases for
> the future – by seeing what topics we need more of and so on…"
(Continue reading)

Renata Dyer | 3 Jun 01:24 2010
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Re: [Publib] "Homemade" Catalog

Stephanie,
I know this slide is old but you may find it interesting:
http://www.slideshare.net/vimal0212/open-source-library-management-systems

.

Also, KOHA became quite big in recent years and you can relatively easily 
find help form either community of suers or a commercial company such as 
the LibLime.

I think LOC will provide MARC records free of charge - not sure how you 
can automate the system; maybe you should consider an LMS with Z39.50 
functionality that will enable you to do copy cataloguing on the go. 
Meaning you will need to open one of the public z39 opacs; perform your 
search for ISBN with a scanner and then when a record is identified you 
revise, make changes and save to your LMS.

Good luck!

Renata Dyer
Manager, Systems and Electronic Services
High Court of Australia Library
Canberra, ACT 2604
ph: 02 6270 6916



From:   Sharon Foster <fostersm1 <at> gmail.com>
To:     Stephanie Zimmerman <slzimm1 <at> gmail.com>
Cc:     T is For Training <tisfortraining <at> googlegroups.com>, 
learnrt <at> ala.org, nexgenlib <at> googlegroups.com, web4lib <at> webjunction.org, 
(Continue reading)

gerrymck | 3 Jun 03:42 2010
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SmartPlanet > Museum Of The Future: Mobile Augmented Reality

Joe McKendrick / June 1 2010

Museums serve to document the growth of arts and sciences of our society,
and in recent years, have been able to reach across the miles to new
audiences, thanks to the proliferation of the Internet.

A new report suggests that museums are also becoming part of the mobile
revolution — yes, if you want to visit the Museum of London without flying
all the way to Heathrow Airport, there’s an app for that. [snip]

“The museum of London has launched an iPhone application which brings its
extensive art and photographic collections alive in advance of the opening
of spectacular new galleries next week. The free app, called “StreetMuseum,”
takes users to various sites in London where, via their iPhone screen,
historical images of the city appear. Over 200 sites have been selected
where users can look through their iPhones and see the past emerge.”

Now you may ask why someone would be inclined to squint at images on a
mobile device, versus using a standard laptop or desktop computer. The
advantage of a handheld museum is that users could access photos and details
of historic buildings or locations while they are physically at the subject
of their curiosity.[snip]

What’s really neat is you can superimpose older images over a current shot
of a streetscape or building — [snip].

The Museum of London is showing some great innovation in expanding its
knowledge beyond the walls of the actual museum itself. As the report says,
“Forward-thinking museums, libraries, archives, and universities will
embrace placing interactive tools in the hands (literally) of everyone from
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Thomas Bennett | 3 Jun 15:07 2010
X-Face

Re: "Homemade" Catalog

You might want to look at the June 2010 Issue 194 of the Linux Journal.  There 
is an articcle "Organizing a Library"  describing different open source 
software for the general public to organize their library.  The review 
includes Koha but the author was somewhat overwhelmed when seeing the Add a 
Marc Record screen.  Also reviewed is Alexandria, GCstar, and Tellico.  In the 
article he mentions he scanned ISBN numbers into a text file then imported them 
into the applications and Alexandria was the only one that automatically 
downloaded "the information about the books".  I suspect you could just as 
well scan directly into the application.  But also with Alexandria, "I had to 
install two gems(hpricot and htmlentites) ...  The system relies on Amazon for 
some of the look ups.  Due to a change in Amazon's policy, I had to sign up to 
get my own Amazon AWS access key."

The author had been using a Shelfari account previous to the review and was 
able to imporport that collection into  Alexandria and exprot from Alexandria 
to Tellico and GCstar.  

I suspect you would want to use an application that you could easily import 
into and export out of in case you move to a different system later, or need to 
share data, and for backup purposes.  If there is not a Windows version you 
could run Linux in a vmware player, there are several distributions ready to 
run on vmplayer.

hth

Thomas

On Wednesday 02 June 2010 16:35:34 Stephanie Zimmerman wrote:
> Hi,
> 
(Continue reading)

Doug Bancks | 3 Jun 15:24 2010
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Video projects

Hi,

If you have an effective system for shooting and editing video in your library

that works for student/patron projects I would appreciate hearing about it in some

detail. What hardware and software have you found to work well? How do you manage computer security and
video downloads?

Thanks

Doug Bancks
Library Media Specialist
Fairmont Jr/Sr High School
900 Johnson Street
Fairmont, MN 56031
dbancks@...<mailto:dbancks@...>
507-235-4107
Robert Balliot | 3 Jun 15:59 2010
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Re: Video projects

I recommend getting a Canon or Sony with a removable flash drive, an HDMI
connection and maybe a Firewire.
I like Canon HF20 and HF200 models.  The next step up is to get a
'professional camera', however the HF20 and HF200 have more features and
power that many pro cameras and the boot allows you to extend capabilities.

Get a good tripod and a good external mike.  Most onboard video camera mikes
do not work very well in the real world.

Windows LifeCam is a great 720p webcam.

Use Adobe Premier for Video Editing if you can afford.  There are many
tutorials available and the knowledge gained by your students would transfer
to the workplace.

Use Vidblaster <http://vidblaster.com/> as a platform.  Engage Vimeo and
Youtube and Livestream accounts.

You might consider checking out how  Guys From Queens - GFQ - set up their
studio and review their recommendations:

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=guys+from+queens&aq=f

Sincerely,
Robert L. Balliot
http://oceanstatelibrarian.com/contact.htm

On Thu, Jun 3, 2010 at 9:24 AM, Doug Bancks <DBancks@...>wrote:

> Hi,
(Continue reading)


Gmane