Robin Hastings | 1 Apr 03:09 2008
Picon

Re: Inhouse wiki

On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 4:02 PM, Lin Light <llight@...> wrote:
> I have been looking for an in-house wiki and came across one
>  called "projectforum". Can anyone tell me anything about them. Purpose is to
>  have a Wiki for my Technical Servies Dept that staff can use instead of a
>  Dept Manual. Don't want it on the web, but to function like an Intranet.
>
>  Lin
>
>

We use DocuWiki (http://wiki.splitbrain.org/wiki:dokuwiki) for our
internal document/manual wiki. It's built to make documentation easy
and shareable.

--

-- 
Robin Hastings
robin.hastings@...
http://www.rhastings.net
Norman Buchwald | 1 Apr 04:12 2008

Greetings

Hello, all.  I have always meant to join the list as one of my functions is to maintain the Library web site.  But
I've finally been prompted as I'm limited with the information that I have.  

I have just learned tonight that our college District is going to utilize the Luminis portal.  I've gone to
the company web site to see a demo--and I'm filled with many questions.  I don't know if this means that our
entire user friendly library web site at http://www.chabotcollege.edu/Library/ becomes
obsolete--or does a student simply link from there to get to other pages--or if the portal somehow frames
everything.  I'm concerned as whether our proxy server (EZProxy) will work within the frame (it hasn't
worked successfully within the frame of Blackboard 6.0), and I'm concerned based on what I saw on the demo
that there was no clear link or presence of the Library or libraries of a particular campus, from this
portal  (The demo I saw was at
http://education.sungardhe.com/Education/demos/luminis_demo/swf/sct_main.html  ).

Of course, I just learned about it this evening and will get more information from the focus group next
week--but I'm wondering:

1.  What do librarians think about it?

2.  Did it have an impact, at all, on the design of your Library web pages?  (trying to make sure there are
visible links, reducing scrolling, etc.)

3.  Were there any issues with databases or other relevant web applications?

4.  When utilizing the Luminis Portal, did it in fact provide an improvement or asset to the Library web
presence and in any way at all improved students finding, utilizing the Library or its online resources?

Thanks,

Norman

(Continue reading)

Tracey.Reed | 1 Apr 14:49 2008

RE: Inhouse wiki

Hi all,

We've been using PBWiki as sort of an extranet for a migration - password protected and requires
registration.  It's worked well for us with about 90 staff spread over 5 locations, most of which have
bandwidth problems which make email difficult.  It's actually been a training exercise for a lot of our
staff as well who had heard of wikis but didn't really understand what they were.

Good luck!
-t
-----
Tracey Reed
Computer Services Librarian
Clearwater Public Library System
tracey.reed@...
727.562.4970 x5036
www.myclearwater.com/cpl
"Living never wore one out so much as the effort not to live." - Anais Nin
Thomas Bennett | 1 Apr 15:31 2008

Re: Greetings

The University uses Luminous here at Appalachian State University.

> 1.  What do librarians think about it?
I don't know.

> 2.  Did it have an impact, at all, on the design of your Library web pages?
>  (trying to make sure there are visible links, reducing scrolling, etc.)
Yes, technical design rather than cosmetic, specifically with online databases 
and III proxy.  The library and other sites are in frames or iframes on 
luminous.  When the offcampus patron clicks on a link for an online database 
in the luminous frame the authentication fails, I don't remember if it showed 
the III authentication page or went straight to the WEB site.  First, all the 
database links are proxy links if the connection is not a university IP.  To 
correct this issue I had to also make all offcampus links open in a new 
window to work in luminous.

Scrolling is increased because the frame the library site is in is the bottom 
half of the luminous WEB page so to get to the bottom of any page it would 
then take twice as much scrolling.  This could be changed with css but we 
have no control over that aspect.

I received a complaint Monday that someone trying to do research on our site 
could only see a very small part of the WEB page.  My first suspicion was 
Luminous and I was correct.  There was a luminous update Friday that added 
"undocumented" css.  After that update luminous only showed our top banner 
and then you had that small of a window to scroll.  This was the case for 
Opera and Firefox on Linux and Windows although Internet Explorer 6 didn't 
seem to have that issue.  After contacting the University WEB master, he 
fixed the frame size problem and was also disturbed by the undocumented css 
update.
(Continue reading)

Thomas Bennett | 1 Apr 15:37 2008

Re: Inhouse wiki

We've been using Plone which allows us to add in wikis, forums, blogs, windowz 
( a product that lets you easily embed another site into yours using iframe), 
and a variety of other useful products.  Its free and built on python to run 
on any platform (Linux, Windows, or Mac).

Thomas

On Monday 31 March 2008 17:02, Lin Light wrote:
> I have been looking for an in-house wiki and came across one
> called "projectforum". Can anyone tell me anything about them. Purpose is
> to have a Wiki for my Technical Servies Dept that staff can use instead of
> a Dept Manual. Don't want it on the web, but to function like an Intranet.
>
> Lin
>
>
> Lin Light
> Head of Computer
>  & Technical Services
> Herrick District Library
> 300 South River Ave.
> Holland, MI 49423
> Voice 616-355-3727
> Fax   616-355-1426
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Web4lib mailing list
> Web4lib@...
(Continue reading)

Joe Hewitt | 1 Apr 16:26 2008

Re: Inhouse wiki

Lin,

I use a tool called TiddlyWiki to keep daily notes and track projects.  Its
approach is to break down information in manageable chunks which it calls
tiddlers, or microcontent. This tiddler can be tagged, then searched by its
tag to obtain a group of similar items. You can also search by keyword.

A tiddlywiki can be customized to your needs using plugins that can be
easily added your tiddlywiki.

If your goal is a Dept Manual, you find a tiddlywiki with tools to publish
in a manual form, and able search by term, topic or chapter.  Tiddlywiki can
be updated through your web browser.  It does not require a web server.  It
can live as a file on your local area network. The tiddlywiki can act like a
blog, a wiki, a todo list, an ebook, an archive, or a presentation as you
require.

TiddlyWiki also has several good implementations of the GTD (Getting Things
Done) approach to being goal-oriented.

Check out http://www.tiddlywiki.org/wiki/Main_Page for a world of
information about this handy little tool. For a look at some possiblities,
see

Eric Shulman's Tiddlytools site: http://www.tiddlytools.com/
Dave Gifford's TiddlyVault: http://tiddlyvault.tiddlyspot.com/
Saq Imtiaz's Lewcid TW: http://tw.lewcid.org/

For a deparmental use, TiddlyWiki may not be the answer and you will need to
talk to your IT staff, but for a smaller, personal, and portable wiki,
(Continue reading)

Anthony Fitzwater | 1 Apr 16:32 2008
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RE: RE: World of Warcraft in a Public Library?

Tiffany is correct on this.  We considered at one time putting WoW on our computers and allowing patrons with
already established accounts to come in and play.  The problems we faced were: 

1). Blizzard tracks IP address usage.  If they find your account being used on multiple IP addresses it can be
subject to ban because they believe your account may have been compromised or your characters are being
power leveled.  2). Keyloggers - it's a big issue in the WoW community.  I would never go into a library, cyber
café, etc. to login because someone could have installed a keylogger to access my account.

I treat my WoW account like my bank account, only use it on my own equipment :)

Anthony Fitzwater
Systems Administrator
Apache Junction Public Library
1177 N. Idaho Rd.
Apache Junction, AZ 85219
(480) 474-8577

-----Original Message-----
From: web4lib-bounces@...
[mailto:web4lib-bounces@...] On Behalf Of Turner, Tiffany
Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 6:30 AM
To: web4lib@...
Subject: [Web4lib] RE: World of Warcraft in a Public Library?

Michael Dargan,

I do not believe you would be able to use World of Warcraft in the
manner you would like.  I play WoW, and each game is tied to an account,
so multiple players could not access their accounts using the same game;
it is against Blizzard's Terms of Use.  Blizzard explains, "You may
(Continue reading)

Tom Keays | 1 Apr 19:08 2008
Picon

Re: Inhouse wiki

I use GTD TiddlyWiki for my own use (it lives in an encrypted space on
a USB drive), but sharing one on a departmental directory is a
fantastic idea.

Tom

On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 10:26 AM, Joe Hewitt
<josephhewitt@...> wrote:
>  If your goal is a Dept Manual, you find a tiddlywiki with tools to publish
>  in a manual form, and able search by term, topic or chapter.  Tiddlywiki can
>  be updated through your web browser.  It does not require a web server.  It
>  can live as a file on your local area network. The tiddlywiki can act like a
>  blog, a wiki, a todo list, an ebook, an archive, or a presentation as you
>  require.
Vrena Patrick | 1 Apr 19:30 2008
Picon

Re: World of Warcraft in Public Library?

Technically, you can play your friend's account on your authentication key.  I have many friends that will
play each other's characters from time to time.  However, you are absolutely correct about Blizzard's
Terms and Use specifically saying users are not supposed to do such.  

  Maybe by contacting Blizzard Entertainment and explaining what you are trying to accomplish and
explaining your situation, they might allow such use.  I suggest this only because they would not be losing
money since each player has to have an account registered with them before they are even allowed to sign on
and play.

  Just a thought.
  Thanks
  Vrena Patrick
  McKinney Memorial Public Library 
  Message: 5
Date: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 08:30:29 -0500
From: "Turner, Tiffany" 
Subject: [Web4lib] RE: World of Warcraft in a Public Library?
To: 
Message-ID:
<5E0BB54BEC5EBA44B373175A080E6401089D0333@...>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Michael Dargan,

I do not believe you would be able to use World of Warcraft in the
manner you would like. I play WoW, and each game is tied to an account,
so multiple players could not access their accounts using the same game;
it is against Blizzard's Terms of Use. Blizzard explains, "You may
establish one (1) user account (the "Account") on the Service for each
Authentication Key you receive from Blizzard" (TOS #3,
(Continue reading)

K.G. Schneider | 1 Apr 19:33 2008

Re: Inhouse wiki

Another vote here for PBWiki. It is not without its buggyness and
limitations, but overall, it's easy to use -- key to any wiki's
adoption.

Karen G. Schneider
kgs@...

On Tue, 1 Apr 2008 13:08:18 -0400, "Tom Keays" <tomkeays@...>
said:
> I use GTD TiddlyWiki for my own use (it lives in an encrypted space on
> a USB drive), but sharing one on a departmental directory is a
> fantastic idea.
> 
> Tom
> 
> On Tue, Apr 1, 2008 at 10:26 AM, Joe Hewitt
> <josephhewitt@...> wrote:
> >  If your goal is a Dept Manual, you find a tiddlywiki with tools to publish
> >  in a manual form, and able search by term, topic or chapter.  Tiddlywiki can
> >  be updated through your web browser.  It does not require a web server.  It
> >  can live as a file on your local area network. The tiddlywiki can act like a
> >  blog, a wiki, a todo list, an ebook, an archive, or a presentation as you
> >  require.
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Web4lib mailing list
> Web4lib@...
> http://lists.webjunction.org/web4lib/
> 
(Continue reading)


Gmane