gyoussef | 2 Jun 19:48 2007

"al-Hasna"

Dear All,
 
al-Hasna was a woman magazine from Lebanon. We have some issues (1909-1910),  and we are thinking of microfilming them. But I would like to know if any of you has more issues of it.
The issues I have are:
Mujallad 1, Ajza: 4, 6, 8, 10, 12. 
Mujallad 2, Ajza: 1-2, 5-10.
Mujallad 3, al-Juz 3.
Thanks,
gamil
 
 
 
Gamil   Youssef
Head,
Middle East Section
The NY Public Library
Asian & Middle Eastern Division.
NY, NY 10018
Tel.: (212)  930-0616
Fax: (212)  930-0551
e-mail:  gyoussef-pr8sHEKKXcY@public.gmane.org
Hirsch, David | 6 Jun 13:04 2007

conservators?


Do any MELANETers know of conservators in the US with experience in Arab/Islamic books? Please respond to me off list.

Thanks!

david

David G. Hirsch
Librarian for Middle Eastern Studies
Charles E. Young Research Library 11630C
UCLA
Box 951575
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1575
email: dhirsch-pJ6Lu2hYgzjHDPtHwZCLWA@public.gmane.org
Tel: +1-310-825-2930
Fax: +1-310-825-6795
efax: +1-707-313-7712

Jeff Spurr | 8 Jun 16:30 2007
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RE: Archive of Robert College to Columbia University

Friends and colleagues,

Does anyone know the circumstances under which this transfer was 
accomplished, and why it was not left in Istanbul?  Despite 
identifying David Cuthell and Hossein Kamaly as principals in the 
process, the reasons remain opaque.

It may be worth noting that our photographic special collections here 
at Harvard's Fine Arts Library contain the very extensive 
photographic collection created by Edgar J. Fisher, professor of 
history and dean at Robert College between 1911 and 1931, mainly but 
not exclusively consisting of snapshots taken by Fisher and his wife, 
Elisabeth Fehr Fisher, many of which document the College and its 
activities.  It is one of the larger constituent parts of the Harvard 
Semitic Museum Photographic Archives, at the FAL since 1995.

Jeff

Date:         Fri, 1 Jun 2007 12:01:58 -0400
From: Alan Fisher <fishera@...>
SubjectH-ISLAMART: Archive of Robert College to Columbia University
To: H-ISLAMART@...

Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2007 08:22:19 +0000 (GMT)
From: Nebahat Avcioglu <nebahatavcioglu@...>

This information might be of interest to some of the list members. 
All best, Naby Avcioglu

Columbia's Rare Book & Manuscript Library Acquires Robert College 
Archive (NEW YORK, April 4, 2007) Columbia University's Rare Book & 
Manuscript Library has recently acquired the archive of Robert 
College of Istanbul, the oldest American school outside the United 
States, active since 1863. Founded by two Americans, philanthropist 
Christopher Rhinelander Robert and Cyrus Hamlin, to offer an 
"American style" education under the Ottoman Empire, Robert College 
has been in operation longer than any other American-sponsored school 
outside the United States. The school and its sister institution, The 
American College for Girls (founded in 1871) have over the years 
educated many of Turkey's leading citizens since the Republic was 
founded in 1923, including two Prime Ministers, many cabinet-level 
ministers, and leaders in medicine, law, business and the arts. "The 
Robert College Archive represents one of the most important examples 
of American 19th century ideals. With the help of a wealthy American, 
Christopher Robert, Hamlin was able to build a school, open to all 
and based on a scientific curriculum. The archives reflect a deep and 
lasting bond between the United States and Turkey," said David 
Cuthell, Executive Director of the Institute for Turkish Studies 
(Washington, DC), and professor at Columbia's School of International 
and Public Affairs, as well as at Georgetown University's School of 
Foreign Service. Discussions with Prof. Cuthell (who is also a 
Trustee of Robert College) leading to the donation of the archive to 
Columbia were initiated by Columbia's Middle East and Jewish Studies 
Librarian, Dr. Hossein Kamaly. The archives of the school go back to 
its very beginnings and include correspondences, governance 
documents, faculty files, buildings and facilities files, and an 
extensive collection of historic photographs. The archive is 
exceptional in its breadth and depth. "This is an extremely valuable 
resource for those who work on many diverse subjects such as the 
histories of the late Ottoman Empire, modern Turkey, Bulgaria, 
missionary activities, etc.. Especially those who are doing research 
on the formative years of the Turkish intellectual, literary and 
political figures such as Halide Edip, Bulent Ecevit, Orhan Pamuk and 
others will find these archives very valuable," added Professor Etem 
Erol, Lecturer in Turkish at the Department of Middle East and Asian 
Languages and Cultures at Columbia University. When organized and 
processed, the Robert College archive will be available for use. For 
further information,
call the RBML at 212-854-5153.
-- 
******************************
Jeffrey B. Spurr
Islamic and Middle East Specialist
Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture
Fine Arts Library, Harvard University
Fogg Art Museum
32 Quincy St.
Cambridge, MA 02138-3802
Phone:  (617) 495-3372
Fax:      (617) 496-4889
http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/finearts/collections/agakhan.html
http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/finearts/islamicclass/index.html
http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/finearts/collections/semitic.html
http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/finearts/collections/semitic_access.html
http://archnet.org/lobby.tcl
http://archnet.org/library/documents/one-document.tcl?document_id=6041
http://archnet.org/library/documents/one-document.tcl?document_id=6042

Ali Houissa | 8 Jun 17:15 2007
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Fwd: 2006 Annual Meeting in Boston

MELA Members--

We need to create a MELA Registry of Membership, a historical list of all past and current members since the inception of the association, which will be maintained by the MELA Secretary. Records of information about those who were actual members, especially in the earlier years, is lacking. William can use your help in this matter; brief data needed would include: professional affiliation, years of membership, office(s) held, academic degrees, and a brief bio. (Info submitted by "third parties" especially about past members who are no longer with us would be  appreciated)

Contact: William Kopycki <kopycki-5ABUIg8pBSecxI7pCafu4Q@public.gmane.org>

Thanks
A.

Ali Houissa
Middle East & Islamic Studies Librarian
President, Middle East Librarians' Association, 2005-2007
509 Olin Library
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853-5301
Tel. (607) 255-5752
Fax (607) 255-6110
 

 
hk368 | 10 Jun 17:05 2007

RE: Archive of Robert College to Columbia University

Dear Colleagues,

The archives of Robert College were located in New York, not
Istanbul. Dr. David Cuthell, a member of the board of trustees of
the College, a Columbia graduate, and a dear personal friend of
mine, made it possible for the transfer of this important
collection to Columbia University. I hope this elucidates anything
that may have been opaque about the transfer.

Should there be any further questions, the office of Columbia's Rare
Books and Manuscripts Librarian can provide more information.

Hossein Kamaly
ME/JS/IS Librarian
Columbia University

Quoting Jeff Spurr <spurr@...>:

> Friends and colleagues,
>
> Does anyone know the circumstances under which this transfer was
> accomplished, and why it was not left in Istanbul?  Despite
> identifying David Cuthell and Hossein Kamaly as principals in the
> process, the reasons remain opaque.
>
> It may be worth noting that our photographic special collections
> here
> at Harvard's Fine Arts Library contain the very extensive
> photographic collection created by Edgar J. Fisher, professor of
> history and dean at Robert College between 1911 and 1931, mainly
> but
> not exclusively consisting of snapshots taken by Fisher and his
> wife,
> Elisabeth Fehr Fisher, many of which document the College and its
> activities.  It is one of the larger constituent parts of the
> Harvard
> Semitic Museum Photographic Archives, at the FAL since 1995.
>
> Jeff
>
> Date:         Fri, 1 Jun 2007 12:01:58 -0400
> From: Alan Fisher <fishera@...>
> SubjectH-ISLAMART: Archive of Robert College to Columbia
> University
> To: H-ISLAMART@...
>
>
> Date: Fri, 1 Jun 2007 08:22:19 +0000 (GMT)
> From: Nebahat Avcioglu <nebahatavcioglu@...>
>
> This information might be of interest to some of the list
> members.
> All best, Naby Avcioglu
>
> Columbia's Rare Book & Manuscript Library Acquires Robert College
> Archive (NEW YORK, April 4, 2007) Columbia University's Rare Book
> &
> Manuscript Library has recently acquired the archive of Robert
> College of Istanbul, the oldest American school outside the
> United
> States, active since 1863. Founded by two Americans,
> philanthropist
> Christopher Rhinelander Robert and Cyrus Hamlin, to offer an
> "American style" education under the Ottoman Empire, Robert
> College
> has been in operation longer than any other American-sponsored
> school
> outside the United States. The school and its sister institution,
> The
> American College for Girls (founded in 1871) have over the years
> educated many of Turkey's leading citizens since the Republic was
> founded in 1923, including two Prime Ministers, many
> cabinet-level
> ministers, and leaders in medicine, law, business and the arts.
> "The
> Robert College Archive represents one of the most important
> examples
> of American 19th century ideals. With the help of a wealthy
> American,
> Christopher Robert, Hamlin was able to build a school, open to
> all
> and based on a scientific curriculum. The archives reflect a deep
> and
> lasting bond between the United States and Turkey," said David
> Cuthell, Executive Director of the Institute for Turkish Studies
> (Washington, DC), and professor at Columbia's School of
> International
> and Public Affairs, as well as at Georgetown University's School
> of
> Foreign Service. Discussions with Prof. Cuthell (who is also a
> Trustee of Robert College) leading to the donation of the archive
> to
> Columbia were initiated by Columbia's Middle East and Jewish
> Studies
> Librarian, Dr. Hossein Kamaly. The archives of the school go back
> to
> its very beginnings and include correspondences, governance
> documents, faculty files, buildings and facilities files, and an
> extensive collection of historic photographs. The archive is
> exceptional in its breadth and depth. "This is an extremely
> valuable
> resource for those who work on many diverse subjects such as the
> histories of the late Ottoman Empire, modern Turkey, Bulgaria,
> missionary activities, etc.. Especially those who are doing
> research
> on the formative years of the Turkish intellectual, literary and
> political figures such as Halide Edip, Bulent Ecevit, Orhan Pamuk
> and
> others will find these archives very valuable," added Professor
> Etem
> Erol, Lecturer in Turkish at the Department of Middle East and
> Asian
> Languages and Cultures at Columbia University. When organized and
> processed, the Robert College archive will be available for use.
> For
> further information,
> call the RBML at 212-854-5153.
> --
> ******************************
> Jeffrey B. Spurr
> Islamic and Middle East Specialist
> Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture
> Fine Arts Library, Harvard University
> Fogg Art Museum
> 32 Quincy St.
> Cambridge, MA 02138-3802
> Phone:  (617) 495-3372
> Fax:      (617) 496-4889
> http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/finearts/collections/agakhan.html
> http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/finearts/islamicclass/index.html
> http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/finearts/collections/semitic.html
>
http://hcl.harvard.edu/libraries/finearts/collections/semitic_access.html
> http://archnet.org/lobby.tcl
>
http://archnet.org/library/documents/one-document.tcl?document_id=6041
>
http://archnet.org/library/documents/one-document.tcl?document_id=6042
>
>

Edward A. Jajko | 13 Jun 03:15 2007
Picon
Picon

New Persian art display opens


Reply-To: "Reply-to" <musenews-i/1LFrLAk6cdnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org>
From: "Muse News" <musenewsmailer-i/1LFrLAk6cdnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org>
To: <eajajko-ihVZJaRskl1bRRN4PJnoQQ@public.gmane.org>
Subject: New Persian art display opens, Susan Vreeland presents latest book
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 17:53:02 -0800
 
 
 
New Exhibition Showcases Paintings Inspired by Famous Persian Poet
Running from June 16 through December 16, Lyric Visions from Nezami’s “Quintet” is a unique display that features images from the Khamseh or "Quintet" of Nezami, one of the most renowned Persian poets of all time. The works on view all come from SDMA's Edwin Binney 3rd Collection and were created by Persian, Indian, and Turkish artists who were inspired by Nezami’s tales of star-crossed lovers and gallant heroes. Join SDMA's Asian art curator Sonya Quintanilla as she speaks about the exhibition at a lecture presented by the

Museum's Committee for the Arts of the Indian Subcontinent (CAIS) on Thursday, June 21. For more details about this event, visit www.sdmart.org.


Fundraiser Highlights Two New Persian Art Displays
Get a sneak preview of Lyric Visions while celebrating Persian art and culture at a special fundraiser held at the Museum. SDMA, together with the Persian Cultural Center of San Diego and the Museum’s Asian Arts Council, presents “A Night of Persian Art for All the Senses” this Friday, June 15, from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. The night's festivities include complimentary gourmet Persian cuisine, a no-host bar, and an exceptional performance of traditional Persian music. Tickets cost $75 for members and $100 for nonmembers and may be purchased in advance or at the door. For more information, please visit www.sdmart.org. All event proceeds will go towards the conservation and restoration of Persian art at SDMA.

San Diego Museum of Art, 1450 El Prado, San Diego, CA 92101
619-232-7931

MUSEUM HOURS
TUESDAY - SUNDAY
10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
THURSDAY
10:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Will Langford | 19 Jun 17:04 2007
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Fw: Appraisal of Islam collection

 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2007 4:08 PM
Subject: Appraisal of Islam collection

The University of Georgia Libraries has acquired a significant Islam collection, and needs to hire someone to appraise it. If you are qualified to appraise such a collection, or know of someone who may, please contact me.
Thank you,
Will Langford
Gifts Coordinator
University of Georgia Libraries
Athens, GA  30602
706-542-0595 
 
The centerpiece of the collection is around 15 hand written and professionally illuminated (goldleaf and color) and bound Arabic and Persian manuscripts (and a couple of Ottoman manuscripts), many of them written by highly skilled calligraphers. There are also a substantial number of 19th century Arabic lithographed books.   
The collection consists predominately of books in the field of Islamic History, with strengths in African (both north Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa), Yemeni, and Iranian Islamic history.  There are also numerous works concerned with the political and religious dimension of Islam, especially Islamic law and spirituality (Sufism), and Islamic literature.  There are also a substantial number of works on Islamic divination  Most of the books are in English, although roughly 10% of the books are in Persian and Arabic (with a few in Ottoman and modern Turkish) and a substantial but smaller percentage of books are in French and German.
Picon

RE: Divine Appraisal of Islam collection


	I hope someone from the MELA will be able to help you.
	FYI, I created a series of bulletin boards on divine protection and
protectors for library collections during the early 1990s. I have placed the
results on my profile page on my librarything.com webpage. The section on
Arabic and Moslem books is given below, and demonstrates the uses and
scholarship of the MELA Notes. 

Lee

R. Lee Hadden
Geospatial Information Library (GIL)
Topographic Engineering Center
ATTN: CEERD-TO-I (Hadden)
7701 Telegraph Road
Alexandria, VA 22315-3864
(703) 428-9206
Robert.L.Hadden@...

See some of my writings, both online and on paper, at my author page at:
http://www.librarything.com/author/haddenrobertlee

-----Original Message-----
From: bounce-1542511-8073248@...
[mailto:bounce-1542511-8073248@...] On Behalf Of Will Langford
Sent: Tuesday, June 19, 2007 11:05 AM
To: melanet-l@...
Subject: Fw: Appraisal of Islam collection

 
----- Original Message -----
From: Will Langford <mailto:wlangfor@...>
To: melanet-l@...
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2007 4:08 PM
Subject: Appraisal of Islam collection

The University of Georgia Libraries has acquired a significant Islam
collection, and needs to hire someone to appraise it. If you are qualified to
appraise such a collection, or know of someone who may, please contact me. 
Thank you,
Will Langford
Gifts Coordinator
University of Georgia Libraries
Athens, GA  30602
wlangfor@...
706-542-0595 

The centerpiece of the collection is around 15 hand written and
professionally illuminated (goldleaf and color) and bound Arabic and Persian
manuscripts (and a couple of Ottoman manuscripts), many of them written by
highly skilled calligraphers. There are also a substantial number of 19th
century Arabic lithographed books.   
The collection consists predominately of books in the field of Islamic
History, with strengths in African (both north Africa and Sub-Saharan
Africa), Yemeni, and Iranian Islamic history.  There are also numerous works
concerned with the political and religious dimension of Islam, especially
Islamic law and spirituality (Sufism), and Islamic literature.  There are
also a substantial number of works on Islamic divination  Most of the books
are in English, although roughly 10% of the books are in Persian and Arabic
(with a few in Ottoman and modern Turkish) and a substantial but smaller
percentage of books are in French and German.

******
ARABIC AND MOSLEM APPEALS
	Appeals to heaven for the prevention of the deterioration of Arabic
manuscripts traditionally takes two forms. The first is a holy inscription in
the book that will give metaphysical protection by divine beings such as jinn
or angels, who would then prevent the desecration of holy writ.
	A second traditional form was an appeal to "Kabi:Kaj," the "King of
the Cockroaches." By appealing to the king to protect a manuscript,
cockroaches (or lesser insects) would refrain from intruding on documents
which could be eaten by the king only. Since many manuscripts were made with
fish-glue, starch-paste, leather and other tasty substances, insect appetites
were a constant and never ending problem to Arabic books and scrolls.
(Pollock, James W. "Kabi:Kaj to Book Pouches: Library Preservation Magic and
Technique in Syria of the 1880's and the 1980's West." Middle Eastern Library
Association Notes (MELA Notes), Number 44, Spring, 1988, pages 8-10.)
	A similar technique from Syria was to name the first and last page of
a document or manuscript "The Page of the King of the Cockroaches", in the
hope that the Cockroach King will control all other insects. Translated
appeals include "O Kabi:Kaj, save the paper!", "O Kabi:Kaj, save this book
from the worms!" and "O Kabi:Kaj, do not eat this paper!" (Adam Gacek. "The
Use of Kabikaj in Arabic Manuscripts." Manuscripts of the Middle East. Volume
I, 1986. Pages 49-53. See also James Pollock's paper mentioned above.)
	"In Maghribi manuscripts, the word appears in its evidently corrupt
form, Kaykataj, and is clearly used as a talisman... and mentions, after a
certain Muhammad al-Samiri, that when one writes "Kaytataj" on the first and
last folio of the book, one can be sure that worms will not attack it."
(Ibid. Page 49.)
	This appeal to Kabi:Kaj is sometimes used with the term "Hafiz,"
which is a religious term that means "One Who has Memorized the Holy Koran."
In this case, the term "Hafiz" is used in the older sense of "Protector (of
the document)" or "ya kabikaj ya hafiz." (Ibid. Page 49.)

Colophons and Curses
	The term "colophon" refers to a slip of paper that describes the
physical parameters of a work. In ancient scrolls, it often included some or
all of the following: the name of the author, transcriber, the title,
subject, publisher, place, date and sometimes a repetition of the first line
of text. This slip protruded from the body of the scroll, and was used as an
index or finding aid. 
	The colophon verified that the item was a true copy, and sometimes
the number of lines in the scroll were added up and the sum placed on the
colophon so a purchaser would know that the copy was a complete copy of the
original text, and, by the way, helped establish the fee for the copy.
	The term "colophon" comes from the Greek and means "summit" or
"finishing stroke," although the origin of the term has been attributed to
Erasmus during the Renaissance. 
	In Mesopotamia, the colophon would often have a blessing on the owner
of the scroll, or a curse if someone would try to alter it, burn it, dissolve
it in water, lose it, lend it, or allow anyone else to steal it. This custom
spread to Hebraic and Arabic works as well, and then into Europe. 
	Even today, modern books have warnings against copyright
infringement, although they pale in comparison to some of the ancient curses
and threats of divine retribution.

	See more in this odd piece of library lore, including Ancient Egypt,
Christian and Aztec library protectors at:
http://www.librarything.com/profile/hadden

Sarah S Ozturk | 19 Jun 21:10 2007
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Announcement of tour and briefing at LC: JACKPHY cataloging, from RLIN to Voyager

JACKPHY Cataloging, from RLIN to Voyager

Philip Melzer and Joan Biella, Regional and Cooperative Cataloging
Division, LC

Meet outside the front door to the Madison Building
Tour and briefing begin at 1:30pm, Friday June 22

Join staff of the Regional and Cooperative Cataloging Division for a
tour of JACKPHY acquisitions and cataloging areas, followed by a
briefing on the migration of cataloging nonroman material from RLIN to
the Library*s ILS, Voyager.  The briefing will describe an experiment
with cataloging JACKPHY material on OCLC and Voyager, enumerate the
important factors that were considered in making the decision to work on
Voyager, and outline plans for the transition.

Please meet in front of the Madison Building at 1:30 to start the tour.
After the briefing you will have ample time to attend the reading room
open houses in the Jefferson Building.

No registration or advance reservation is required, but please email
Philip Melzer at pmel <at> loc.gov if you need special ADA accommodations. 

For more information about tours and events at the Library for ALA
Conference Participants, see the Library*s ALA Conference home page
at:
http://www.loc.gov/ala/ 

John Eilts | 21 Jun 00:25 2007
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MELA publications on the web site

MELA members,

Thanks to our Secretary-Treasurer William Kopycki for supplying the last 
printed copy of the MELA publication: COOPERATION AMONG MIDDLE EAST 
LIBRARIES OF NORTH AMERICA, it has been scanned and we now have it up on 
the MELA web site at http://www.mela.us/coop.pdf.  This is the 
proceedings of the workshop held in Ann Arbor, Michigan May 26-31, 1975.

I hope that the other MELA publications will also appear on the web site 
during the course of this summer.

John


Gmane