Natasha The Bear | 2 Jun 10:57 2010
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Re: What would you call a person (in word)

I think "outspoken" means a person who is opinionated and speaks his mind without being asked his
opinion--not necessarily a person who is indiscreet or a gossip. "Plainspoken" is one who speaks
directly without embellishment.
Natasha

--- On Mon, 5/31/10, Haliman <halimans <at> shaw.ca> wrote:

From: Haliman <halimans <at> shaw.ca>
Subject: Re: [EngFor] What would you call a person (in word)
To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, May 31, 2010, 9:42 AM

  

How about "outspoken" and "plainspoken"?

On 30/05/2010 5:58 PM, Natasha The Bear wrote:
>
> I would add ' A gossip." The one I hear the most is "Blabbermouth."
>
> --- On Sun, 5/30/10, Ann English <Ann.English <at> clear.net.nz 
> <mailto:Ann.English%40clear.net.nz>> wrote:
>
> From: Ann English <Ann.English <at> clear.net.nz 
> <mailto:Ann.English%40clear.net.nz>>
> Subject: Re: [EngFor] What would you call a person (in word)
> To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com <mailto:EngFor%40yahoogroups.com>
> Date: Sunday, May 30, 2010, 4:52 PM
>
>
(Continue reading)

Natasha The Bear | 2 Jun 10:59 2010
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Re: What would you call a person (in word)

Yes, I agree. A "Big Mouth" fits the definition.

--- On Mon, 5/31/10, Caio Rossi <caiorossi <at> gmail.com> wrote:

From: Caio Rossi <caiorossi <at> gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [EngFor] What would you call a person (in word)
To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, May 31, 2010, 9:57 AM

Hello,

I guess "outspoken" means "sincere", doesn't it? And how about "a big
mouth", as I suggested before?

Caio (non-native)

On Mon, May 31, 2010 at 10:42 AM, Haliman <halimans <at> shaw.ca> wrote:

>
>
> How about "outspoken" and "plainspoken"?
>
>
> On 30/05/2010 5:58 PM, Natasha The Bear wrote:
> >
> > I would add ' A gossip." The one I hear the most is "Blabbermouth."
> >
> > --- On Sun, 5/30/10, Ann English <Ann.English <at> clear.net.nz<Ann.English%40clear.net.nz>
> > <mailto:Ann.English%40clear.net.nz <Ann.English%2540clear.net.nz>>>
> wrote:
(Continue reading)

Mabel | 2 Jun 14:05 2010
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prepositions: to vs. for

Hello everybody!
I need some help, please!!!
Can use the verb "to write" + preposition "for"
eg.: I write a letter for my dad (or I write a letter to my dad)
And I have the same problem when I have to use the verb "to read".
May I wirte: "I read a novel for my son"? (or I read a novel to my son)

If you have time can u explain the difference between "to" and "for"?

Thanx and have a nice day.

Mabel

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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Bill Kelly | 2 Jun 15:36 2010
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Re: prepositions: to vs. for

Hi Mabel:

In both your examples, you want "to."

"I write a letter for my Dad." That would mean that you wrote the letter 
on behalf of your Dad, because he could not or would not do it himself:

Because my father's arms were broken, I wrote a letter for him.

In general, "for" is used to indicate the object, aim, or purpose of an 
action. It means roughly "on behalf of."

Bill Kelly
Connecticut USA

--

On 6/2/2010 8:05 AM, Mabel wrote:
>
> Hello everybody!
> I need some help, please!!!
> Can use the verb "to write" + preposition "for"
> eg.: I write a letter for my dad (or I write a letter to my dad)
> And I have the same problem when I have to use the verb "to read".
> May I wirte: "I read a novel for my son"? (or I read a novel to my son)
>
> If you have time can u explain the difference between "to" and "for"?
>
> Thanx and have a nice day.
>
(Continue reading)

Farhan Noor | 3 Jun 06:23 2010
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please advise

is this correct usage of grammar?
 
Incorporated in 1999, and began operations in 2000, the company is registered and supervised by
Securities and Exchange Commission.
 
I have an issue with "began operations".. doesnt feel or sound correct. (or right?)
 
please advise (not advice, right?)
 
thanks..

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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Ann English | 3 Jun 10:39 2010
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Re: please advise


On 3/06/2010, at 4:23 PM, Farhan Noor wrote:

> is this correct usage of grammar?
>
> Incorporated in 1999, and began operations in 2000, the company is  
> registered and supervised by Securities and Exchange Commission.
>
> I have an issue with "began operations".. doesnt feel or sound  
> correct. (or right?)
>
> please advise (not advice, right?)
>
> thanks..

Correct.  /adveIz/, spelled "ise", is the verb.  /adveIs/ , spelled  
"ice", is the noun.  I don't know why.

"Incorporated" is the -ED form used in the passive mood.  "Registered"  
and "supervised" are the same. Sometimes I tell students that these - 
ED forms are like adjectives.

The word "began" is an active verb.  That is why it sounds odd.  You  
are trying to say "The company is began ..."

Put the "is" verbs in, thus:

(1) The company was incorporated in 1999, and began operations in  
2000. It is registered with, and supervised by, the Securities  
Commission.
(Continue reading)

Farhan Noor | 4 Jun 09:23 2010
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ANN: Re: please advise

dear ann,
enlightening, for sure. and what more, it makes perfect sense to me now. thanks for correcting me.

regards

________________________________
From: Ann English <Ann.English <at> clear.net.nz>
To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, 3 June, 2010 13:39:13
Subject: Re: [EngFor] please advise

  

On 3/06/2010, at 4:23 PM, Farhan Noor wrote:

> is this correct usage of grammar?
>
> Incorporated in 1999, and began operations in 2000, the company is 
> registered and supervised by Securities and Exchange Commission.
>
> I have an issue with "began operations".. doesnt feel or sound 
> correct. (or right?)
>
> please advise (not advice, right?)
>
> thanks..

Correct. /adveIz/, spelled "ise", is the verb. /adveIs/ , spelled 
"ice", is the noun. I don't know why.

(Continue reading)

suresh babu | 4 Jun 09:58 2010
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Re: ANN: Re: please advise

what is the meaning of ED form Mr. Ann

--- On Fri, 4/6/10, Farhan Noor <HALWAPURI <at> yahoo.com> wrote:

From: Farhan Noor <HALWAPURI <at> yahoo.com>
Subject: ANN: Re: [EngFor] please advise
To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, 4 June, 2010, 12:53 PM

  

dear ann,
enlightening, for sure. and what more, it makes perfect sense to me now. thanks for correcting me.

regards

________________________________
From: Ann English <Ann.English <at> clear.net.nz>
To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thu, 3 June, 2010 13:39:13
Subject: Re: [EngFor] please advise

  

On 3/06/2010, at 4:23 PM, Farhan Noor wrote:

> is this correct usage of grammar?
>
> Incorporated in 1999, and began operations in 2000, the company is 
> registered and supervised by Securities and Exchange Commission.
(Continue reading)

suresh babu | 4 Jun 10:02 2010
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Re: please advise


Mr. Ann
 
in the following sentences we can use it has been operations from 2000 instead of 
and beginning operations in 2000.
 
please clarify this 
 
Thanks and Regards
 
Suresh

--- On Thu, 3/6/10, Ann English <Ann.English <at> clear.net.nz> wrote:

From: Ann English <Ann.English <at> clear.net.nz>
Subject: Re: [EngFor] please advise
To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, 3 June, 2010, 2:09 PM

  

On 3/06/2010, at 4:23 PM, Farhan Noor wrote:

> is this correct usage of grammar?
>
> Incorporated in 1999, and began operations in 2000, the company is 
> registered and supervised by Securities and Exchange Commission.
>
> I have an issue with "began operations".. doesnt feel or sound 
> correct. (or right?)
(Continue reading)

Ann English | 4 Jun 11:20 2010
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Re: ANN: Re: please advise


On 4/06/2010, at 7:58 PM, suresh babu wrote:

> what is the meaning of ED form Mr. Ann

Greetings, Suresh Babu

(1) "Ann" is a woman's name.  It is good style to use "Mr" for a man  
and "Ms" for a woman.  Informally, with friends, use neither.  Say  
"What do you mean by the -ED form, Ann?"

(2) English verbs add a suffix in three ways.

i   The third person  singular present tense uses verb+S.
Example. I run. You run. He runs.

ii  The continuous uses verb+ING.
Example. I am learning. You are learning.  He is learning.
The word "learning" is the -ING form of "learn".

iii The past uses verb+ED.
Example.  I swallowed the medicine.  I have swallowed the medicine.  I  
had swallowed the medicine.
The word "swallowed" is the -ED form of "swallow".

Even if the verb is irregular, we still speak of the -ED form.
Example.  The wood was burned.  The toast was burnt.  Both "burned"  
and "burnt" are the -ED form of "burn".

Slowly, some irregular verbs are becoming regular.  For example,  
(Continue reading)


Gmane