Natasha The Bear | 2 May 01:57 2010
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Re: First and second scans

I think "second-scanned" is perfect as long as everybody knows what it means (a different scan from the
first scan).
In my experience with that, each scan has a name, such as, accepted, en route, arrival, pick-up, etc. You can
always just say what the second scan specifically refers to.
 
Natasha

--- On Wed, 4/28/10, Ann English <Ann.English <at> clear.net.nz> wrote:

From: Ann English <Ann.English <at> clear.net.nz>
Subject: Re: [EngFor] First and second scans
To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, April 28, 2010, 4:25 PM

  

On 28/04/2010, at 10:13 PM, Luis wrote:

> Hi there,
>
> I have been a member of this very helpful group for a long time; I 
> left a while ago and now I am back again!
>
> I have a question today. Here where I work they deal with mailing 
> bags, which have to be scanned twice. They refer to those scans as 
> "first scan" and "second scan".
>
> Part of my job is to come up with useful messages to the application 
> users. Messages like "this bag has already been scanned for the 
> second time" or "this bag has already been through its second scan".
(Continue reading)

Luis | 13 May 19:36 2010
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Born late?

Hi there,

Thanks Ann and Natasha for the replies to my previous question.

Now I have another one: when I was born my mum was 40, so when I tell people
that my mum is 65 (obviously this a made up number, I am not revealing my
age :) they find it a bit strange.

So, is there a word or expression to succinctly explain that "when I was
born my mother was older than the average age women usually have babies"?

Thanks
Luis

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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Natasha The Bear | 14 May 20:12 2010
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Re: Born late?

Hi Luis,
I think this is what is usually said: "My mom was late-in-life when she gave birth to me."  Then you would
add: "She was 40." (Or whatever the age was).
 
Natasha

--- On Thu, 5/13/10, Luis <talk2luis <at> yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

From: Luis <talk2luis <at> yahoo.co.uk>
Subject: [EngFor] Born late?
To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, May 13, 2010, 1:36 PM

  

Hi there,

Thanks Ann and Natasha for the replies to my previous question.

Now I have another one: when I was born my mum was 40, so when I tell people
that my mum is 65 (obviously this a made up number, I am not revealing my
age :) they find it a bit strange.

So, is there a word or expression to succinctly explain that "when I was
born my mother was older than the average age women usually have babies"?

Thanks
Luis

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
(Continue reading)

Cynthia Van Slogteren | 14 May 22:41 2010
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Re: Born late?

Luis,

You can say:

I was a "change-in-life" baby.

Or:

My parents were older when I was born.

Cynthia

On Thu, May 13, 2010 at 10:36 AM, Luis <talk2luis <at> yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

>
>
> Hi there,
>
> Thanks Ann and Natasha for the replies to my previous question.
>
> Now I have another one: when I was born my mum was 40, so when I tell
> people
> that my mum is 65 (obviously this a made up number, I am not revealing my
> age :) they find it a bit strange.
>
> So, is there a word or expression to succinctly explain that "when I was
> born my mother was older than the average age women usually have babies"?
>
> Thanks
> Luis
(Continue reading)

Luis | 17 May 14:12 2010
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In spirit

Hi there,

Someone updated her online status (this phrase said a few years ago wouldn't make any sense would it?!) to:

- Always go to other people's funerals otherwise they won't come to yours.

I would like to replying saying (as a joke):

- Yeah, or they may come up with the usual cheap excuse "I didn't go but I was there in spirit."

But I am not sure if that would make sense... is "I was there in spirit" a valid and correct expression?

Thanks!
Luis

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Ann English | 18 May 00:35 2010
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Re: In spirit


On 18/05/2010, at 12:12 AM, Luis wrote:

> Hi there,
>
> Someone updated her online status (this phrase said a few years ago  
> wouldn't make any sense would it?!) to:
>
> - Always go to other people's funerals otherwise they won't come to  
> yours.
>
> I would like to replying saying (as a joke):
>
> - Yeah, or they may come up with the usual cheap excuse "I didn't go  
> but I was there in spirit."
>
> But I am not sure if that would make sense... is "I was there in  
> spirit" a valid and correct expression?
>

Yes, it's okay.

To my ear, your word "or" doesn't sit comfortably with the word  
"otherwise" before it.  For style (not grammar) I suggest this pattern:

Always A for other people, otherwise they won't B.
Yeah, and they'll come up with the usual C.

I hope this is helpful

(Continue reading)

Farhan Noor | 18 May 09:08 2010
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Is this correct?

Hello,

1..
Lastly, due to the nature of my work, in which I need to remain ...

"in which" or "where" ??

2..
my travelling cost has succeeded my budget ...

"has" or "have"??

I still dont get where to use which .. has or have..

Best Regards,

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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Bill Kelly | 20 May 12:19 2010
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Re: Is this correct?

Hello Farhan Noor:

1. I cannot tell from your information what the correct answer is. 
Please give more context. I suspect the answer is probably either of the 
following

(a) Finally, due to the nature of my work, for which I need to remain ...
(b) Finally, due to the nature of my work, which requires me to remain ...

2. ... my travelling expenses have exceeded my budget

Please note that in business English, there is a distinction between 
"cost" and "expense."

The difference between "has" and "have" is this: The former is used when 
the subject is singular, the latter when the subject is plural.

Bill Kelly
Connecticut USA

--

On 5/18/2010 3:08 AM, Farhan Noor wrote:
>
> Hello,
>
> 1..
> Lastly, due to the nature of my work, in which I need to remain ...
>
> "in which" or "where" ??
(Continue reading)

suresh babu | 21 May 16:05 2010
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Re: Is this correct?

Hi Groups,
 
The difference between has and have is
 
you can use has in third person singular
 
you can use have in  first person sigular or second person plural
 
expenses is already u paid something
cost is not yet paid 
 
i hope the above was correct
if i committed the mistake plz correct me
 
 

--- On Thu, 20/5/10, Bill Kelly <bkelly <at> snet.net> wrote:

From: Bill Kelly <bkelly <at> snet.net>
Subject: Re: [EngFor] Is this correct?
To: EngFor <at> yahoogroups.com
Cc: "Farhan Noor" <HALWAPURI <at> yahoo.com>
Date: Thursday, 20 May, 2010, 3:49 PM

  

Hello Farhan Noor:

1. I cannot tell from your information what the correct answer is. 
Please give more context. I suspect the answer is probably either of the 
(Continue reading)

Ann English | 22 May 00:53 2010
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Re: Is this correct?


On 22/05/2010, at 2:05 AM, suresh babu wrote:

> Hi Groups,
>
> The difference between has and have is
>
> you can use has in third person singular

Correct in the present tense.   "She (and he, and it) has."

>
> you can use have in  first person singular or second person plural

Correct in the present tense for all persons (first, second, and  
third.)  "I, (and we, and you, and they)  have."

In the past tense, all persons use the form "had."   "I, we, you, she,  
he, it, they had."

Today, it is okay to use "they" instead of "he or she."  Whether it  
means one person or more, "they" always uses "have".
Example.  "Somebody has left their lunch on the bus.  The driver has  
left it at the office. If that person knows who they are, they have  
one minute to go to the office and get their lunch back."

>
> expenses is already u paid something
> cost is not yet paid

(Continue reading)


Gmane