Terrence Lockyer | 1 Jan 01:26 2012
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Gods of the London Underground

A Twitter post from Clare Gibson at

https://twitter.com/#!/MrsSymbols/status/152721018975289345

notes a 1912 poster for the London Underground featuring an ensemble of 
gods, including a few one might not quite expect, such as Charon (because he 
offered cheap transport, apparently), Pan, and even Eros (I thought that 
sort of thing was frowned upon on public transport):

http://www.20thcenturylondon.org.uk/server.php?show=conObject.3392

Terrence Lockyer
Johannesburg, South Africa 

Colin McLarty | 1 Jan 01:45 2012

Re: Gods of the London Underground

On Sat, Dec 31, 2011 at 7:26 PM, Terrence Lockyer <lockyert <at> mweb.co.za> wrote:

> notes a 1912 poster for the London Underground featuring an ensemble of
> gods, including a few one might not quite expect, such as Charon (because he
> offered cheap transport, apparently), Pan, and even Eros (I thought that
> sort of thing was frowned upon on public transport):

But  this is 1912.  The Greeks as taught to students were devoted to
innocent pleasures.

Colin

Mark Davidson | 1 Jan 07:18 2012
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Re: Fwd: [Imperial Rome] Cockerel figurine found in Roman grave in Cirencester

Perhaps it's worth considering what the people of Cirencester have to
say on the subject.

From the official website of the city:
http://www.cirencester.co.uk/townfacts.htm

"Many people ask how you pronounce Cirencester. It is pronounced 'Si
ren ses ter'"

Mark Davidson

Mark Davidson | 1 Jan 08:32 2012
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OT: Thought for the day

For all New Year resolutionists, an incentive to do more than just resolve:

Be wise to-day; 'tis madness to defer;
Next day the fatal precedent will plead;
Thus on, till wisdom is push'd out of life.
Procrastination is the thief of time;
Year after year it steals, till all are fled.
And to the mercies of a moment leaves
The vast concerns of an eternal scene.
If not so frequent, would not this be strange?
That 'tis so frequent, this is stranger still.

Of Man's miraculous mistakes, this bears
The palm, "That all men are about to live,"
For ever on the brink of being born.
All pay themselves the compliment to think
They one day shall not drivel; and their pride
On this reversion takes up ready praise;
At least their own; their future selves applauds;
How excellent that life they ne'er will lead!
Time lodg'd in their own hands is Folly's vails;
That lodg'd in Fate's, to Wisdom they consign;
The thing they can't but purpose, they postpone:
'Tis not in folly, not to scorn a fool;
And scarce in human wisdom to do more.
All promise is poor dilatory Man,
And that through ev'ry stage: When young, indeed,
In full content, we sometimes nobly rest,
Unanxious for ourselves; and only wish,
As duteous sons, our fathers were more wise.
(Continue reading)

Barry H. | 1 Jan 13:50 2012
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Re: OT: Thought for the day

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Mark Davidson" <markfdavidson <at> GMAIL.COM>
To: <CLASSICS-L <at> LSV.UKY.EDU>
Sent: Sunday, January 01, 2012 2:32 AM
Subject: [CLASSICS-L] OT: Thought for the day

> For all New Year resolutionists, an incentive to do more than just 
> resolve:
>
>
> Be wise to-day; 'tis madness to defer;
> Next day the fatal precedent will plead;
> Thus on, till wisdom is push'd out of life.
> Procrastination is the thief of time;

I'm so glad I've never gotten around to joining the Procrastinators' Club!

N.E. Barry Hofstetter, semper melius Latine sonat...
The American Academy
http://www.theamericanacademy.net
(2010 Salvatori Excellence in Education Winner)

The North American Reformed Seminary
http://www.tnars.net

http://my.opera.com/barryhofstetter/blog
http://mysite.verizon.net/nebarry

Mariano Paniello | 1 Jan 18:14 2012
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Emmett L. Bennett Jr., Ancient Script Expert, Dies at 93

Emmett L. Bennett Jr., a classicist who played a vital role in 
deciphering Linear B, the Bronze Age Aegean script that defied solution 
for more than 50 years after it was unearthed on clay tablets in 1900, 
died on Dec. 15 in Madison, Wis. He was 93.        

More:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/01/science/emmett-l-bennett-jr-dies-at-93-helped-decipher-linear-b.html?pagewanted=1&hpw

or

http://tinyurl.com/7w73gda

MP
 		 	   		  
Judith Hallett | 2 Jan 06:34 2012
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2013 CAMP Panel cfp

  .
>
>
> Bodies in Motion: Contemporary Approaches to Choral Performance
> A Panel Sponsored by the Committee on Ancient and Modern Performance
> APA/AIA Joint Annual Meeting, Seattle, January 2013
> Call for Papers
>
> The classical chorus’ combination of text, music, and dancing is a 
> rare phenomenon in the history of Western theater. The experience was 
> indeed short-lived: choral parts separated the scenes but were not 
> integral to the action in the late comedies of Aristophanes and in 
> Menander; papyri containing choral lyrics prove that anthologies of 
> dramatic choral odes were circulating in the Roman period; choruses 
> sang but did not dance in Roman pantomimes; and with a few exceptions, 
> modern Western theater has dispensed with the chorus altogether. The 
> development of opera in the seventeenth century, followed by the rise 
> of the ballet in the late eighteenth century, led to an 
> institutionalized division between the performing arts. As a result, 
> the Greek chorus often was perceived as an embarrassment in nineteenth 
> and twentieth-century productions of ancient plays.
>
> More recently, however, several productions have offered powerful and 
> highly corporeal interpretations of Greek choruses, often inspired by 
> non-Western dancing traditions. Richard Schechner’s Dionysus in 69 
> (1968), Ariane Mnouchkine’s Les Atrides (1990-1992), Katie Mitchell’s 
> Oresteia (2000), Wlodzimierz Staniewski’s Elektra (2002) and Iphigenia 
> at Aulis (2007), and Anne Bogart’s Antigone (2009) are but a few 
> examples of productions that have used the Greek chorus to offer a new 
> form of theater emphasizing collective movement, redefining theatrical 
(Continue reading)

Stephanie Budin | 2 Jan 18:05 2012
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The faults with Ben-Hur (the movie)

    Of possible interest.  -Stephanie Budin

 From <http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2011/dec/22/ben-hur-reel-history>:

Ben-Hur: playing to the galley

The chariot race remains one of the most stunning action sequences
ever shot, but William Wyler's epic of first-century Judaea puts
spectacle before specifics
     Alex von Tunzelmann

Director: William Wyler
Entertainment grade: B–
History grade: C

     Ben-Hur
     Production year: 1959
     Country: USA
     Cert (UK): PG
     Runtime: 217 mins
     Directors: William Wyler
     Cast: Charlton Heston, Haya Harareet, Jack Hawkins, Stephen Boyd
     More on this film

During the first century AD, the Roman empire took control of the
Mediterranean. The eastern province of Judaea was ruled by prefects
Valerius Gratus from 15-26AD and Pontius Pilate from 26-36AD.

Religion
Lew Wallace, previously a general in the American civil war, wrote his
(Continue reading)

Robert White | 2 Jan 19:20 2012
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Re: The faults with Ben-Hur (the movie)

FTA:
"Religion
Lew Wallace, previously a general in the American civil war, wrote his
epic Ben-Hur in 1880, when he was governor of New Mexico territory. To
the modern reader its appeal may be difficult to unlock, but Wallace's
pious, turgid and contrived novel was a massive 19th-century
bestseller. Despite the subtitle, A Tale of the Christ, Jesus of
Nazareth is an incidental character. The film's director, William
Wyler, avoids showing his face. "The Christian world would not
tolerate a novel with Jesus Christ its hero, and I knew it," Wallace
wrote in his 1906 autobiography. "He should not be present as an actor
in any scene of my creation." Wyler followed suit."

(1) The author of this piece seems blissfully unaware of the 1925
original version (and that Wyler was one of its ADs)- this film is
mentioned in the comments section, tho...

(2) The author doesn't mention (or know?) that Ben-Hur had a long 
and profitable life as a touring stage show (6 appearances on Broadway!)
well before 1925- or that one of its stage producers got a hefty
sum of $$ from MGM for permission to make the film.

(3) Finally, the author doesn't seem to grasp that LW was correct in 
his assessments
of the risks in any depiction of JC. See the problems for Cecil B. 
DeMille in the 
making of his "The King of Kings" (1927)....

Bob White

(Continue reading)

Goya | 2 Jan 19:27 2012
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Re: The faults with Ben-Hur (the movie)

"...Historically, it's true
that there were tensions between Romans and Jews.."

You don't say.

Michael Chase
CNRS UPR 76
Paris-Villejuif
France


Gmane