DANIEL P. TOMPKINS | 1 Sep 01:09 2010
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Re: The Book (in Norwegian)

Ah.  My mistake

Dan

On Tue, Aug 31, 2010 at 6:57 PM, Lusnia, Susann S <slusnia <at> tulane.edu> wrote:
> Here, with English subtitles:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQHX-SjgQvQ&feature=related
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Classical Greek and Latin Discussion Group on behalf of DANIEL P. TOMPKINS
> Sent: Tue 8/31/2010 5:54 PM
> To: CLASSICS-L <at> LSV.UKY.EDU
> Subject: [CLASSICS-L] The Book (in Norwegian)
>
> I'd be surprised if this has not already come to the list, but just in
> case it has not:
>
> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOorZQLsmuA&NR=1
>
> Dan
>

Dr Rudolph Masciantonio | 1 Sep 01:37 2010
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Dr. Mabel Lang, 1917-2010, Greek Scholar and Professor at Bryn Mawr College

Sodales,
I am sorry to report that Professor Mabel Lang, prominent Greek scholar and 
professor at Bryn Mawr College, has died   at age 92 according an obituary 
article just published in the _Philadelphia Inquirer_on August 29, 2010. The 
article described her as "an inspiring, caring, and demanding teacher" 
whose graduate seminars on Homer and Thucydides set a standard in the field.   
Her undergraduate "baby" Greek course was legendary. She continued to write 
and do research after retirement, and her book on Thucydides will be 
published this fall. She received many awards and honors over her long life and 
spent summers excavations at Gordion, Athens, and Pylos. I remember her kindness 
and good humor in answering questions from the audience after her engaging 
lectures at classical meetings.
The author of the obituary article was Sally A. Downey at 
sdowney <at> phillynews.com.
Sincerely,
Rudy Masciantonio

Dr. Rudolph Masciantonio
429 S. 20th St., # A
Philadelphia, PA 19146
e-mail: Rudolphus9 <at> aol.com
telephone: 215 732 6431
website: http://masciantonio.blogspot.com/
...

Robert T. White | 1 Sep 02:34 2010
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Fwd: German and Latin have met their demise at the University of Southern Mississippi

FYI....

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>From:         Elaine Coney <emconey <at> NETDOOR.COM>
>Subject: German and Latin have met their demise at the University of 
>Southern Mississippi
>To:           FLTEACH <at> LISTSERV.BUFFALO.EDU
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>
>Colleagues,
>
>Another funeral -  German and Latin, along with other programs, may have met
>their untimely deaths at the University of Southern Mississippi
>(Hattiesburg, MS) for FY2012. The president of USM stated in an email that
>twenty-nine faculty members have been notified that "the current academic
>year will be the terminal year on their contracts. ...Ten . serve in the
>College of Arts & Sciences,.,eight in the College of Education &
>Psychology." 
>
>
>
(Continue reading)

June Samaras | 1 Sep 03:00 2010
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Theater review: 'In the Wound: The Salt Plays'

Theater review: 'In the Wound: The Salt Plays'

Robert Hurwitt, Chronicle Theater Critic

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

In the Wound: The Salt Plays: Part 1: Drama. Written and directed by
Jon Tracy. Through Oct. 3. Shotgun Players, John Hinkel Park,
Berkeley. Two hours, 10 minutes. $10. (510) 841-6500.
www.shotgunplayers.org.

War is raging in Berkeley's John Hinkel Park. It isn't pretty. It
isn't particularly heroic. But it's damned good theater.

"In the Wound," Jon Tracy's liberal rewrite of Homer's "Iliad,"
pulsates to the drums of goddesses and throbs with the combat, tedium,
confusion and carnage of extended war. Not that this ambitious
project, the first part of Tracy's two-play Homeric "The Salt Plays,"
is anywhere near as gory as the average war movie. The swords are
drumsticks. The carnage is choreographed and the bloodshed left to
your imagination. Which may make it more intense.

Written and directed by Tracy - with a stirring and yearning
percussion and vocal score by Brendan West and the unusually large
31-person ensemble - the Shotgun Players world premiere runs weekends
in the park through Oct. 3. It is by no means a straight dramatization
of the "Iliad." Like "The Farm," Tracy's very loose adaptation of
George Orwell's "Animal Farm" last year, "Wound" takes considerable
liberties with its source.

(Continue reading)

John McChesney-Young | 1 Sep 04:46 2010
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General Interest: Reading Arabic isn't easy

The brain's right hemisphere is not involved in the initial processes
of reading in Arabic, due to the graphic complexity of Arabic script.
Therefore reading acquisition in Arabic is much harder in comparison
to English. This has been shown in a series of studies that were
carried out at the Department of Psychology and the Edmond J. Safra
Brain Research Center for the Study of Learning Disabilities at the
University of Haifa. These studies have been published in the
prestigious journal Neuropsychology.

The rest at:

http://www.physorg.com/news202466251.html

John

--

-- 
John McChesney-Young ** Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
JMcCYoung~at~gmail.com ** http://twitter.com/jmccyoung **
http://jmccyoung.blogspot.com/

James M. Pfundstein | 1 Sep 05:56 2010
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Ghosts of Planet Orestes

Some classical content looming in the background: Jo Walton's recent review of an 80s era sf novel, Melissa
Scott's THE KINDLY ONES.

http://www.tor.com/blogs/2010/08/masks-and-moons-melissa-scotts-the-kindly-ones

http://bit.ly/agaQJx

JM("Medium is the Messenger")P
Goya | 1 Sep 07:44 2010
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Re: The Concept of Life in Late Ancient Philosophy and Grice

For reasons that are beyond me, Mr. Speranza continues to regale us with
his unmatched ignorance of all aspects of Greek philosophy

<snip>

> "Life without  Equivocation:  Plotinus on what it means to be  alive"
>
> --------  This contrasts what Aristotle (whom I, with L. Horn, call the
> "Greek  Grice") and Grice think on what it means to be 'alive'. In
> general,
>
> Aristotle, unlike Grice, was a bit confused about this. He used 'zoon'
> for
>
> 'alive',

M.C. No he didn't. *Zoon* means animal, no more, no less.

but there was also the idea of 'psykhe'

M.C. Um, yeah, in fact Aristotle wrote one of the most influential books
in the history of Western philosophy on the subject (De anima = Peri
psukhes). Mr Speranza should perhaps skim through it some day

--. Grice prefers  to
> stick
> with  'psykhe' as the criterion. Of course by the time of  Plotinus people
> no
> longer  KNEW.

(Continue reading)

Ralph Hancock | 1 Sep 11:47 2010
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Re: General Interest: Reading Arabic isn't easy

Michael Lane wrote:

> It's mainly (not
> entirely) a question of remembering that final and independent
> (stand-alone) forms of letters take a flourish at the end....

Not entirely ... you can say that again. I'm slowly teaching myself to
read Arabic from the numerous shop signs in Arabic in my very
cosmopolitan part of London. Lack of vowels I can deal with, I'm used
to that from Hebrew.

But in Arabic there are two final letters that are completely
uncertain: the circle that can be either -t or -h, whether or not it
carries the two top dots that are meant to distinguish them, and the
S-shaped wiggle that can be either -y or -a, whether or not it carries
the two bottom dots.

Add to this those medial letters distinguished only by dots -- the
same letter shape for n, t, b, y and in Persian p -- and you have
yourself quite a reading problem.

And that's before you get to the deformations in handwritten letters
caused by stacking or merging them, for example in the common word on
Persian restaurants _resturan_, where the r and the s are often
simplified into a single curve without any indentation whatsoever.

This is *not* an easy alphabet.

RH

(Continue reading)

Mark F Davidson | 1 Sep 09:43 2010
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Re: General Interest: Reading Arabic isn't easy

>The brain's right hemisphere is not involved in the initial processes
>of reading in Arabic, due to the graphic complexity of Arabic script.
>Therefore reading acquisition in Arabic is much harder in comparison
>to English.

This seems to support Mustafa Kemal Atatürk's decision to change the written
Turkish language from Arabic script to the Latin alphabet.

MFD

Michael F. Lane | 1 Sep 10:45 2010

Re: General Interest: Reading Arabic isn't easy

Huh.  I studied Arabic for three years as an undergrad, and I found -- and
despite lack of practice lately, still find -- no difficulty reading (i.e.
at least parsing) or writing it.

I don't think the alphabet is nearly as formidable as it first appears to
those familiar with the Latin alphabet (for example).  It's mainly (not
entirely) a question of remembering that final and independent
(stand-alone) forms of letters take a flourish at the end....

-- MFL

> The brain's right hemisphere is not involved in the initial processes
> of reading in Arabic, due to the graphic complexity of Arabic script.
> Therefore reading acquisition in Arabic is much harder in comparison
> to English. This has been shown in a series of studies that were
> carried out at the Department of Psychology and the Edmond J. Safra
> Brain Research Center for the Study of Learning Disabilities at the
> University of Haifa. These studies have been published in the
> prestigious journal Neuropsychology.
>
> The rest at:
>
> http://www.physorg.com/news202466251.html
>
> John
>
> --
> John McChesney-Young ** Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
> JMcCYoung~at~gmail.com ** http://twitter.com/jmccyoung **
> http://jmccyoung.blogspot.com/
(Continue reading)


Gmane