Bradley Skene | 31 Jul 17:22 2014
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Roman Dice

A google search didn't turn up much that looked useful on Roman dice games,
does anyone know of an informative site (or maybe a passage in an older
work on google books)?

Cheers,

Bradley A. Skene

Grote, Dale | 30 Jul 23:41 2014

From Ancient to Modern Greek

Hi all -- second call for a lead on a textbook designed teach Modern Greek (demotic) to students and teachers
of Ancient Greek. I.e., a book that just points out the difference between the two without reinventing the
wheel. 

Anyone know of such a thing off hand? 

Thanks 

Dale
June Samaras | 30 Jul 21:46 2014
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What lessons can we draw from antiquity?

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_wsite3_1_30/07/2014_541663

What lessons can we draw from antiquity?

'It isn’t the Greeks that need the Germans or indeed Europe. It is Europe
that needs the Greeks. Not the glory that was Greece. Not the Hollywood
version of ancient Greece: white men in togas. Not that. Not at all. That’s
ideology, that’s nationalistic bullshit. That we can do without,' he says.

By Simon Critchley *

Our theme is limits. And we are gathered here at this limit of Europe,
close the to sea: the limitless, the boundless.

And we face all sorts of limits. There are the limits of knowledge – faced
with the vastness of the cosmos and the smallness of the human mind.

There are the limits of life – we will all die, and who wants to die? I
don’t. And what lies beyond death’s limit? And if nothing lies beyond it,
then how do we accept that life is so limited, so brief, that man is a
shadow that is here and then gone?

Minute by minute, day by day, and year by year, we confront terrifying
ecological limits, the limits of human life on earth. We have transformed
the seemingly limitless earth into a limited resource that we use and use
up. The earth might well continue, but perhaps without human beings. Human
beings face a seemingly insurmountable environmental limit: the limit of
humanity’s existence on this beautiful, blue planet.

Capitalism, we are told, is limitless, it promises a future of limitless
(Continue reading)

Regan Barr (Lukeion | 30 Jul 21:16 2014

Recommendations for Greek Tragedy texts and books on meter

I have an advanced high school student who's planning on going into Classics
and has taken all 4 years of Greek that I offer in standard classroom
format; readings include JACT's "Greek Anthology," Lysias, Plato,
Thucydides, and Xenophon).  She'd like to do an independent study reading
tragedy for her 5th year.  I'm considering the Bryn Mawr Commentaries, but
have to admit that I'm leaning that direction simply because I them used in
grad school (20 years ago).  I'd appreciate any recommendations this group
can give in three areas:

(1) for a combination text and commentary/vocabulary helps, are there other
resources you recommend (other than Bryn Mawr)?

(2) do you have a favorite tragedy/text for someone who hasn't previously
read much poetry (just what's in the "Anthology")?

(3) do you have a favorite introductory text on Greek meter?

Regan Barr

 <mailto:regan <at> lukeion.org> regan <at> lukeion.org

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This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
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Timothy Renner | 30 Jul 19:34 2014

Re: Instructors still needed for Classics and Humanities courses at Montclair State University in NJ.

Jean if you're going to mention archaeology in connection with Greek Civ. (and I think I know why you did) you
should also refer to history. I know you're trying to woo people with a soft approach that will appeal to
everyone, but sooner or later we'll have to tell them.

On 07/30/14, Jean Alvares  <alvaresj <at> mail.montclair.edu> wrote:
> The Department of Classics and General Humanities at Montclair State University still has a number of
unstaffed sections of Classics and Humanities Courses. Most of these are one day a week courses. Right now
we have open..
> 
> GNHU 115 (TROY AND THE TROJAN WAR) (this is often taught with an archaeological component)
> 
> 06 0 F 1000-1230PM 12542
> 11 20 S 1100-0215PM 17213
> 
> GNHU 201 GENERAL HUMANITIES I
> 
> 03 0 WF 1130-1245PM STAFF LEC 12549
> 
> GNHU 281 (GREEK CIV) (this is usually taught with an archaeological component)
> 
> 01 M 1000-1115AM V STAFF 12572
> 
> GNHU 285 Mythology)
> 
> 03 TF 0830-0945AM STAFF 12586
> 08 T 1000-1230PM STAFF N LEC 12591
> 13 F 1000-1230PM STAFF N LEC 12595
> 23 MR 0400-0515PM STAFF 12605
> 
> For a sample syllabus for General Humanities I, see
(Continue reading)

Scott Holcomb | 30 Jul 18:45 2014
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Titus Atius Labienus and Atia of the Julii

Salvete,

I am wondering if anyone knows of an explicit genealogical connection
between Labienus and Atia.  Labienus, according to a speech by Cicero,
seems to be from Picenum, which is where Pompey and his family are from,
and, of course, Labienus turns out to be a supporter of Pompey.  Atia's
grandmother was Strabo's sister (Pompey's aunt).

Gratias!

Scott

Jgibson | 30 Jul 18:34 2014
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C.S. Lewis quote

Can anyone here tell me whether C.S. Lewis said "“We can’t know what a 
thing is for until we first know what a thing is“, and if he did, where 
he said it?

With thanks in advance,

Jeffrey

--

-- 
---
Jeffrey B. Gibson  D.Phil. Oxon.
1500 W.  Pratt Blvd
Chicago, IL
jgibson000 <at> comcast.net

Diana Wright | 30 Jul 16:20 2014
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Pericles

http://www.ekathimerini.com/4dcgi/_w_articles_wsite1_1_30/07/2014_541804

DW

Jean Alvares | 30 Jul 16:05 2014

Instructors still needed for Classics and Humanities courses at Montclair State University in NJ.

The Department of Classics and General Humanities at Montclair State 
University still has a number of unstaffed sections of Classics and 
Humanities Courses. Most of these are one day a week courses. Right now 
we have open..

GNHU 115 (TROY AND THE TROJAN WAR) (this is often taught with an 
archaeological component)

06 0 F 1000-1230PM 12542
11 20 S 1100-0215PM 17213

GNHU 201 GENERAL HUMANITIES I

03 0 WF 1130-1245PM STAFF LEC 12549

GNHU 281 (GREEK CIV) (this is usually taught with an archaeological 
component)

01 M 1000-1115AM V STAFF 12572

GNHU 285 Mythology)

03 TF 0830-0945AM STAFF 12586
08 T 1000-1230PM STAFF N LEC 12591
13 F 1000-1230PM STAFF N LEC 12595
23 MR 0400-0515PM STAFF 12605

For a sample syllabus for General Humanities I, see

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/90558904/JA_GENHUM1_syll_F06.pdf
(Continue reading)

DANIEL P. Tompkins | 30 Jul 14:30 2014
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La terre contre l'État!

To various friends and colleagues:

This is not a major item by any means, but I'm sending it to a wider circle
than usual in case anyone has comments.

"If you visited Versailles, you wouldn't take a part of it home with you."

*Le Monde *reports, with some verve, on a wine-grower who harvested
antiquities from his land, emphasizing the gap between the individual & the
state - the latter, an entity the farmer seems barely to acknowledge.  The
high point comes  when the judge describes Caesar's *Bella Gallica *as
*passionant*,  adding that the National Archaeological Museum "is worth a
detour."

How many French farmers patrol their land with metal detectors?  He can't
be the only one.  This chap's national pride led him to *discard Roman
finds*, keeping only the Gaulish.

A British colleague informs me that "metal-detectorism" is widespread in
the UK, and that there's a "Portable Antiquities Scheme" set up for
self-reports of discoveries:

http://finds.org.uk/

Can *we *convey the "passion" of Caesar's genocidal march through France
(over a million killed)?  I don't think I achieved that.  But Lorant
Deutsch,  the talented comedian / somewhat controversial
<http://www.lexpress.fr/culture/livre/hexagone-de-lorant-deutsch-un-livre-qui-tombe-des-mains_1303817.html>
author of *Metronome *and *Hexagone* might: he provides one of the voices
in *Asterix <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h7RJHFHRAC8>.*
(Continue reading)

June Samaras | 30 Jul 03:47 2014
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Call for Papers: Epigrams on Art in Byzantium, Kalamazoo 2015

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture <mjcbac <at> hchc.edu>
Date: 29 July 2014 20:45
Subject: [MGSA-L] Call for Papers: Epigrams on Art in Byzantium, Kalamazoo
2015

Please post the following CFP to the MGSA listserv.

Many
​ thanks,

Brandie Ratliff
Director, Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture
Hellenic College Holy Cross
50 Goddard Avenue, Brookline, MA 02445, USA
E-mail: mjcbac <at> hchc.edu
Tel: + 617 850 1242
www.maryjahariscenter.org
Follow us:
 <at> mjcbac <https://twitter.com/mjcbac>
facebook.com/maryjahariscenter

​***​
Call for Papers: Epigrams on Art in Byzantium, Kalamazoo 2015
Organizer and presider: Dr. Ivan Drpić, University of Washington, Seattle
Sponsor: Mary Jaharis Center for Byzantine Art and Culture

Papers are invited for *Epigrams on Art in Byzantium*, a Mary Jaharis
Center sponsored session at the 50th International Congress on Medieval
Studies, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, May 14–17, 2015.
(Continue reading)


Gmane