Stewart Felker | 22 Oct 02:20 2014
Picon

Earliest occurrences of the idea that the mindset of someone who performs a magical act or prayer will itself affect the outcome?

I'm aware that some things in the New Testament might qualify as such; but
I'm particularly looking for pre-Christian examples of this (or, in any
case, examples that can be plausibly be shown to have not been influenced
by Christianity).

I'm also aware that, even in early Greek prayer, _sincerity_ was thought to
be necessary for fulfillment.

But I guess I'm looking for examples more along the lines of where the
"power" really rests with the individual him- or- herself: where the
strength of his/her belief in the likelihood of a prayer or spell's
fulfillment itself affects the fulfillment.

Any leads would help!

Stewart Felker,
University of Memphis

Kayla Burson | 21 Oct 20:10 2014

Forthcoming: Carl W. Blegen: Personal and Archaeological Narratives

ISD, Distributor of Scholarly Books, is pleased to announce a forthcoming 
title from Lockwood Press!

We are offering 20% off pre-orders made through the end of December.

Orders are welcome by phone or fax, by email to orders <at> isdistribution.com, or 
by clicking through to our website from the link below. Simply enter the 
promotional code 280-14 when prompted at checkout, and offer prices will be 
applied.

Carl W. Blegen:
Personal and Archaeological Narratives

edited by Natalia Vogeikoff-Brogan, Jack L. Davis, and Vasiliki Florou

ISBN: 9781937040222 (pb); 9781937040239 (PDF eBook); 9781937040246 (EPUB 
eBook) Page Count: xii, 240 pages, illus. 

Publication Date: January 2015

Regular Price: $34.95

*Pre-order Price: $27.95*

Description:

Carl Blegen is the most famous American archaeologist ever to work in Greece, 
and no American has ever had a greater impact on Greek archaeology. Yet 
Blegen, unlike several others of his generation, has found no biographer. In 
part, the explanation for this must lie in the fact that his life was so 
(Continue reading)

sbudin | 21 Oct 18:15 2014
Picon

Gladiator diet

    For the herbivores in the crowd.  -Stephanie Budin

 From < http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141020090006.htm>:
=================================================================

Roman Gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank a tonic of 
ashes
after training
Anthropology unlocks clues about Roman gladiators' eating habits

Roman gladiators ate a mostly vegetarian diet and drank ashes after
training as a tonic. These are the findings of anthropological
investigations carried out on bones of warriors found during 
excavations
in the ancient city of Ephesos.

Historic sources report that gladiators had their own diet. This
comprised beans and grains. Contemporary reports referred to them as
"hordearii" ("barley eaters").
In a study by the Department of Forensic Medicine at the MedUni Vienna
in cooperation with the Department of Anthropology at the Institute of
Forensic Medicine at the University of Bern, bones were examined from a
gladiator cemetery uncovered in 1993 which dates back to the 2nd or 3rd
century BC in the then Roman city of Ephesos (now in modern-day 
Turkey).
At the time, Ephesos was the capital of the Roman province of Asia and
had over 200,000 inhabitants.

Using spectroscopy, stable isotope ratios (carbon, nitrogen and 
sulphur)
(Continue reading)

Lisa Maurice | 21 Oct 08:59 2014
Picon

Ancient Autograph collection?

I received this from a friend who asks:

"Forgive me for bothering you but I am writing an article about an
autograph collection we have in the National Library and am looking for a
source for Pliny's autograph collection or his collection of letters -
preferably in his own writings or a reliable source that I can quote.
Everyone writes that he and Cicero collected autographs but no-one quotes a
source".

She goes on to quote the only source she has found to date, an email from
Steven Raab, who cited the autograph collecting legend on his blog, and
says:

"I found the information online in a 19th century publication, very likely
a British publication from mid-century with what seemed a very good
knowledge of antiquities. The article mentioned that Pliny the Elder had a
collection of manuscripts, and that Pliny the Younger inherited that. I
believe I recall the statement that Pliny the Elder was looking through
these when he saw the volcanic activity on Vesuvius".

The letter referring to Pliny the Elder's death says only that he
'studebat'  when volcanic activity was first seen.  I suspect this is an
urban legend created by the 19th century source.  Does anyone know
otherwise or have an ancient source for autograph collection?

Thanks,

Lisa Maurice

(Continue reading)

June Samaras | 21 Oct 03:32 2014
Picon

Longest poem of classical-era unearthed in western Turkey

[The word "Greek:" never seems to occur in reports like this from Turkey
.... and as for being the "longest"  <vbg> .... but at least it is
described as a  “catalectic trochaic tetrameter.”  JS]Longest poem of
classical-era unearthed in western Turkey
ANKARA - Cihan News Agency
http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/longest-poem-of-classical-era-unearthed-in-western-turkey.aspx?pageID=238&nID=73190&NewsCatID=375

The stela is an extraordinary finding that offers a treasure trove of data
to historians and philologists.

Excavations around the Hecatomnus Mausoleum in the western province of
Muğla’s Milas district have unearthed a written stela that dates back over
two millennia.

The stela is an extraordinary finding that offers very important data to
historians and philologists, according to academics.

The stela, which is estimated to have been written for the ruler of its
era, is in the poetry format and the longest among other similar
classical-era findings.

According to information provided by the Milas Uzunyuva Project Epigraph
Professor Christian Marek, the writing on the stela has a poetical language
in a style called “catalectic trochaic tetrameter.”

There are 121 lines in the stela, although its upper surface has been
eroded. It is estimated that the stela was erected at the end of fourth
century B.C. or at the beginning of the third century B.C.

October/19/2014
(Continue reading)

June Samaras | 20 Oct 23:35 2014
Picon

App. for Medieval Handwriting

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.agbooth.handwriting.medieval

Medieval Handwriting
agbooth.com <https://play.google.com/store/apps/developer?id=agbooth.com>
- 1 January 2014
Education <https://play.google.com/store/apps/category/EDUCATION>
Install
Add to wishlist

(49)

[image: Medieval Handwriting - screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval
Handwriting - screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval Handwriting -
screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval Handwriting - screenshot
thumbnail][image:
Medieval Handwriting - screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval Handwriting -
screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval Handwriting - screenshot
thumbnail][image:
Medieval Handwriting - screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval Handwriting -
screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval Handwriting - screenshot
thumbnail][image:
Medieval Handwriting - screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval Handwriting -
screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval Handwriting - screenshot
thumbnail][image:
Medieval Handwriting - screenshot thumbnail][image: Medieval Handwriting -
screenshot thumbnail]
Description
The origins of this app lie in online exercises in palaeography developed
for postgraduate students in the Institute for Medieval Studies at the
University of Leeds in West Yorkshire, U.K. The aim is to provide practice
(Continue reading)

Kayla Burson | 20 Oct 17:15 2014

Newly Arrived Titles in Classics

ISD, Distributor of Scholarly Books, is pleased to offer 20% off the list 
price of the books below through November 15th.

Orders are welcome by phone or fax, by email to orders <at> isdistribution.com, or 
by clicking through to our website from any of the links below. Simply enter 
the promotional code 282-14 when prompted at checkout, and offer prices will 
be applied.

1.
The Edges of the Roman World

edited by Marko A. Jankovic, Vladimir D. Mihajlovic and Stasa Babic

9781443858991
Hardback, 305 pages
Publication Date: April 2014

Regular Price: $84.95 / Special Offer Price: $68.00

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

Description:
The Edges of the Roman World is a volume consisting of seventeen papers 
dealing with different approaches to cultural changes that occurred in the 
context of Roman imperial politics. Papers are mainly focused on societies on 
the fringes, both social and geographical, and their response to Roman 
Imperialism. This volume is not a textbook, but rather a collection of 
different approaches which address the same problem of Roman Imperialism in 
local contexts. The volume is greatly inspired by the first Imperialism and 
Identities at the Edges of the Roman World conference, held at the Petnica 
(Continue reading)

Jessica Romney | 20 Oct 16:22 2014
Picon
Picon

Graduate Student Caucus of the Classical Association of Canada

Apologies for any cross-posting.

The Graduate Student Caucus (GSC) of the Classical Association of 
Canada/Société canadienne des études classiques (CAC/SCEC) would like to 
invite students engaged in graduate studies of any level and interested in 
participating in the activities of the GSC and the Association to join the 
GSC Facebook page and/ or Google Group.  Job postings, calls for papers, 
teaching/ research aids, and items of general interest to Classicists, in 
Canada and abroad, are posted there.

The Facebook page can be found at: 
https://www.facebook.com/GraduateStudentCaucus

The GSC organizes a professionalization panel at the CAC/SCEC annual 
meeting, normally held in May, that is targeted specifically at graduate 
students.  This year’s panel was comprised of papers on entering the 
academic and non-academic job market; past papers have touched on topics 
such as technology in the classroom, performance in the early career years, 
and the transition from graduate student to faculty member.  The GSC meets 
during the CAC/SCEC annual meeting.  Membership in the CAC/SCEC is not 
required for participation in the Facebook site; it is required for giving a 
paper at the annual meeting.  

Further information on the GSC and on joining the CAC/SCEC can be found 
here: 
http://cac-scec.ca/wordpress/grad-constitution/
http://cac-scec.ca/wordpress/membership/

The CAC/SCEC offers a discount membership rate for students, and graduate 
students are automatically enrolled in the GSC without any additional cost.  
(Continue reading)

June Samaras | 20 Oct 07:13 2014
Picon

Subject: Job Posting Announcement: Assistant Head Librarian, Library of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

Subject: Job Posting Announcement: Assistant Head Librarian, Library of the
Institute for the Study of the Ancient World

POSITION OPENING:  http://library.nyu.edu/about/jobs.html#AHISAW

*Assistant Head Librarian, Library of the Institute for the Study of the
Ancient World*

*Description:*

New York University seeks a qualified Assistant Head Librarian for the
Library of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World.  The Assistant
Head Librarian reports to the ISAW Head Librarian.

The Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW) is a unique center
for advanced scholarly research and graduate education, offering the Ph.D.
degree through NYU’s Graduate School of Arts and Science. It has a wider
geographic span than other programs that focus on the ancient world,
incorporating not only Europe and the entire Mediterranean basin, but also
the Near East, and Central, South, and East Asia. In its research and its
teaching of doctoral students, ISAW emphasizes an interdisciplinary
approach, one that transcends modern boundaries of nation. It supports
scholarship that crosses customary disciplinary boundaries – art history,
literature, archaeology, history, geography, geology, economics, and
sociology, among others – to create a new intellectual framework for
understanding the ancient world, and to train a new generation of scholars
steeped in that integrated approach.

*Responsibilities:*

(Continue reading)

Ralph Hancock | 20 Oct 04:21 2014
Picon

The origin of the Chimaera?

A _New Scientist_ article about mysterious eternal flames coming out of the
ground in Turkey, believed to have inspired Homer:
http://goo.gl/MjzXK6
Apparently it's all down to ruthenium. How could we have been so stupid as
not to think of that earlier?

RH

June Samaras | 19 Oct 07:11 2014
Picon

Antalya restaurant serving up ancient Roman dishes

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/antalya-restaurant-serving-up-ancient-roman-dishes.aspx?pageID=517&nID=72901&NewsCatID=377

Antalya restaurant serving up ancient Roman dishes

ANTALYA – Anadolu Agency

The dishes of the Roman era are being served at a restaurant opened in
Antalya by a Japanese academic who was inspired by the Galen of Pergamon in
preparing the popular dishes

Peckish for the fare that graced the tables of caesars, legionaries or your
normal plebeian? Then look no further than a new restaurant in Antalya
started by a Japanese academic who serves dishes from the Roman era.

“Foods like olive oil, fish, fish oil and watercress were used intensely
2,000 years ago. The dishes in the restaurant are generally from the
Roman-era kitchen,” said Kaoti Goto, a professor at Japan’s Gunma
University Anatomy and Genetics Department.

Yemek Doktoru (Galenus Farm), to provide the tastes of two millennia ago
after reading about the story of Dr. Galen of Pergamon.

Galenos cured people while recommending that they eat healing plants that
he had discovered, Goto said, noting that she was now preparing dishes
using these plants at the restaurant in special earthenware clay pots.

Goto came to Turkey in 2011 and did research in Pergamon, examining the
plants there. She subsequently began preparing dishes after conducting
exhaustive research on ancient sources.

(Continue reading)


Gmane