Bell-Metereau, Rebecca L | 3 Nov 22:02 2009

Re: Across the Tracks: Love and Class (3/1/10; 11/11-14/10)

From:    "Cynthia Miller" <cymiller <at> tiac.net>

Call for Papers
"Across the Tracks: Love and Class in Film and History"
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and
Television
November 11-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory
Second Round Deadline: March 1, 2010

AREA: Across the Tracks: Love and Class in Film and History

Since cinema's earliest moments, inter-class romance has been a staple
feature of popular films.  Whether focusing a sympathetic eye on
working-class life, as in The New Disciple (1921) and Metropolis (1927),
or promoting cross-class fantasies, as in the classic Cinderella (1950),
and its urban fairy tale update Pretty Woman (1990), the notion of love
across the tracks has complicated the lives of cinematic characters, and
called into question taken-for-granted notions about love and money.
Generations of films reprise the dubious but pleasing notion that the
sheer power of romantic love and attraction can (and does) transcend or
circumvent social class strictures, lifting one of the lovers out of
poverty, confirming his/ her inherent nobility, proving that life is rich
in possibility, and that social hierarchies are merely temporary obstacles
for the pure of heart.

This area, comprising multiple panels, welcomes papers and panel proposals
that examine all forms and genres of films featuring inter-class romance,
perhaps as wish-fulfillment fantasy or as an odd version of American Dream
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Bell-Metereau, Rebecca L | 8 Nov 16:54 2009

Re: 2010 ASAT Conference CFP

________________________________________
From: Tanfer Emin Tunc [tanfer.emin <at> gmail.com]

American Studies Association of Turkey
34th International American Studies Conference

The Art of Language: Cultural Expressions in American Studies

November 3–5, 2010
Alanya, Turkey

Confirmed Speakers:

Shirley Geok-Lin Lim
Cherrie Moraga
Celia Herrera Rodriguez

According to American poet and essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson, “Thought
is the blossom; language the bud; and action the fruit behind it.”
Without language in all of its forms—oral, written, visual, and
symbolic—there would be no way to translate thoughts into political
action or personal expression.  In many branches of American Studies,
language itself has become a form of art—the vehicle through which
those in the mainstream and in the margins have communicated their
histories, cultures and visions of the future.  Socially-constructed
and thus almost always political in nature, language not only allows
individuals to develop an understanding of their environment(s), but
also permits them to engage in the shaping of their own landscapes.

Language is thus intrinsic to the expression of culture.  Not only
(Continue reading)

Bell-Metereau, Rebecca L | 9 Nov 11:07 2009

Re: CFP Issue #67 of The Velvet Light Trap: "Seening Race: Our Enduring Dilemma"

From: R. Colin Tait [rcolintait <at> hotmail.com]

CFP Issue #67 of The Velvet Light Trap: Seeing Race: Our Enduring Dilemma

"You lie!" Rep. Joe Wilson shouted during President Barack Obama's
speech on health care reform in the halls of Congress. Media pundits
were quick to point out that the 19th century was the last occasion of
such an egregious breach of protocol took place in Congress. Members of
both Houses urged the Republican congressman from South Carolina to
apologize for his misconduct--and he did. Soon after, though, the
discourse shifted to the reasons for Wilson's outburst. The factor of
race became one major point in attributing blame, but that fire was
never allowed to flame because of the overwhelmingly hegemonic ideology
of colorblindness that currently saturates our culture. This same story
could be told in relation to the nomination of Supreme Court Justice
Sonia Sotomayor, the pop culture firestorm that singed Isaiah
Washington and the cast of Grey's Anatomy, or the discourses surrounding First Lady Michelle Obama's hair.
The notion that we cannot talk about race unless it is specifically and
clearly identified as such in media and culture-at-large is as
implicitly understood as is the notion of "one nation under God"--and
it is just as powerful. And yet, although we claim to be blind to the
markers of external and cultural difference, we always "see" race.

Issue #67 of The Velvet Light Trap will explore all the varied
ways that we "see" race in television, film and new media. While the
editors maintain a broad definition of "seeing race," special
consideration will be given toward articles that interrogate the nexus
of racial visibility as a sociocultural fact and/or color blindness as
an ideological practice. Whether papers approach seeing race as a
discursive category, a commercial commodity, and/or an object of
(Continue reading)

Bell-Metereau, Rebecca L | 9 Nov 11:05 2009

Re: William O'Farrell Fellowship at Northeast Historic Film in Maine

From: oldfilm <at> aol.com [oldfilm <at> aol.com]

William O'Farrell Fellowship at Northeast Historic Film in Maine

Northeast Historic Film (NHF) is pleased to announce the William
O’Farrell Fellowship program. The William O'Farrell Fellowship is
awarded to an individual engaged in research toward a publication,
production, or presentation based on moving image history and culture,
particularly amateur and nontheatrical film. It honors the continuing
legacy of Canadian film archivist William O’Farrell, a long time
advocate for amateur and nontheatrical film collections.

The fellowship is designed to support a month’s study within Northeast
Historic Film’s collections. Awardees must commit a minimum of two
weeks to research in residency at NHF.

Eligibility

·   Researchers from all academic disciplines are eligible and encouraged to apply.

·   Applicants may be current graduate students, faculty, or staff at a
college or university; archive professionals; film producers; or
independent scholars.

·   The fellowship is open to U.S. citizens and foreign nationals with appropriate visas

·   Proposed research must be for work intended for publication,
production, or presentation with significant research in the
collections of Northeast Historic Film.

(Continue reading)

Bell-Metereau, Rebecca L | 9 Nov 11:16 2009

question re male midlife crisis film literature

From: Frank, Michael [MFRANK <at> bentley.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, November 03, 2009 9:42 PM
To: H-NET List for Scholarly Studies and Uses of Media
Subject: unusual question

a student of mine has decided to write about films that depict men's mid-lie crisis

there are certainly enough films for him to watch  [i find myself tempted to tell him that ALL american cinema
represents male mid-life agonies] . . . .   but he's been unable to find any secondary material at all dealing
with the subject . . . does anyone have any suggestions for critical essays or book chapters that approach
this issue from whatever angle?

many thanks

mike

Darryl Wiggers | 10 Nov 08:37 2009
Picon

Re: question re male midlife crisis film literature

From: "Jason McKahan" <JMCKAHAN <at> shepherd.edu>

1) Might have to start out with broader theory on the topic, e.g.:

Mike Featherstone and Mike Hepworth, "The mask of ageing and the  
postmodern life course," in The Body: Social Process and Cultural  
Theory, ed. Mike Featherstone, Mike Hepworth, and Bryan S. Turner  
(SAGE, 1991).

Faludi, Susan. Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man, Perennial,  
2000.

2) Then search for specific bibliographies on filmography (e.g. lit on  
American Beauty)?

Kathleen Rowe Karlyn, "Too Close for Comfort": "American Beauty" and  
the Incest Motif. Cinema Journal, Vol. 44, No. 1 (Autumn, 2004), pp.  
69-93.

Erica Arthur, Where Lester Burnham Falls Down: Exposing the Facade of  
Victimhood in American Beauty. Men and Masculinities, Vol. 7, No. 2,  
127-143 (2004).

Alexandra Krithades?, At the Movies: American Beauty. San Francisco  
Jung Institute Library Journal
Autumn 2000, Vol. 19, No. 2, Pages 73-77 , DOI 10.1525/jung. 
1.2000.19.2.73

3) Also, search film bib db's for Midlife Crisis. E.g. Film and  
Literature DB:
(Continue reading)

Darryl Wiggers | 10 Nov 08:38 2009
Picon

Re: question re male midlife crisis film literature

From: Gustavo Adolfo Aybar <gustavoadolfoaybar <at> gmail.com>

Robert L. Johnson has several books that deal with this topic. there
is also a book about Don Quixote and his midlife crisis--titled
Madness and Lust by Carroll B. Johnson, The isssue of the Eodipal
Conflict, defeating the mother, and the journey to seek independence
and growth all appear in these texts.
They are a good start. Other than Freud or Jung.

Gustavo Adolfo Aybar

Darryl Wiggers | 10 Nov 08:39 2009
Picon

CFP- Hemisphere: Visual Cultures of the Americas

From: Corey Dzenko <cjdzenko <at> gmail.com>

CALL FOR PAPERS (apologies for cross-postings)

*Hemisphere: Visual Cultures of the Americas*, Volume III

Deadline for Submissions: January 16, 2010

*Hemisphere: Visual Cultures of the Americas *is an annual publication
produced by graduate students affiliated with the Department of Art  
and Art
History at the University of New Mexico.  *Hemisphere* provides graduate
students the opportunity to publish articles, recent exhibition and book
reviews, and interviews pertaining to all aspects and time periods of  
the
visual and material cultures of North, Central, South America, the  
Caribbean
and related world contexts.

We seek completed 20-30 page papers from advanced Ph.D. students, and  
5-10
page reviews and interviews from M.A. and Ph.D. students, for  
publication in
the peer-reviewed Volume III of *Hemisphere*.  We accept submissions  
written
in English or Spanish.

Topics of past articles include:

*the commemoration of death and celebration of life at the Temple of the
(Continue reading)

Darryl Wiggers | 10 Nov 08:40 2009
Picon

CFP (Multiple): Writers in Love (3/1/10; 11/11-14/10)

From: Cynthia Miller <cymiller <at> tiac.net>

Their words bring love into being ... Please scroll down for calls for  
papers for Writers in Love/Writers and Love/Writing and Love in Film  
and Television; and Jane Austen in Film and History

Call for Papers
“Writers in Love / Writers and Love / Writing and Love in Film and  
Television”
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and  
Television
November 11-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory
Second-Round Deadline: March 1, 2010

AREA:  “Writers in Love / Writers and Love / Writing and Love in Film  
and Television”

The author may be dead, but they still fall in love.  It is somewhat  
ironic that, a couple of decades after “the death of the author” was  
pronounced in literary theory, a spate of films have appeared devoted  
to the writer as a special kind of character.  Many of these films  
focus on the love life, emotional involvements or sexual adventures of  
the author in question as a way of imposing narrative and thematic  
cohesiveness on the material of the writer’s life, humanizing or even  
sentimentalizing the writer, and investing the potentially academic  
exercise of literary biography with the popular appeal of romance.

While some filmic treatments employ the romance dimension of the  
(Continue reading)

Darryl Wiggers | 10 Nov 08:40 2009
Picon

CFP (Multiple): Love and Gender Traps (3/1/10; 11/11-14/10)

From: Cynthia Miller <cymiller <at> tiac.net>

Loving by the (gendered) rules ... Please scroll down for calls for  
papers for: An American Bromance: Homosocial Love in Film and  
Television; Love and the Family Man; 'Women and Children First':  
Gender and Ethics.

***

Call for Papers
"An American Bromance: Homosocial Love in Film and Television"
2010 Film & History Conference: Representations of Love in Film and  
Television
November 10-14, 2010
Hyatt Regency Milwaukee
www.uwosh.edu/filmandhistory
Second Round Deadline: March 1. 2010

AREA: An American Bromance: Homosocial Love in Film and Television

In American cinema, the buddy film, which tends to focus on male  
relationships, has been surging. Consider, for example, I Love You,  
Man (John Hamburg, 2009), Role Models (David Wain, 2008), Superbad  
(Greg Mottola, 2007), and Wedding Crashers (David Dobkin, 2005). These  
so-called "Bromances" are also featured on the small screen in sitcoms  
such as Scrubs (JD, Turk) and How I Met Your Mother (Ted, Marshall),  
as well as in hour-long shows like House, M.D. (Wilson, House) and  
Boston Legal (Alan, Denny).

What cultural circumstances or social forces—or fears—have caused this  
(Continue reading)


Gmane