Kimiko Small | 1 May 01:04 2010
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Partlets

Hi all,

I was going over Arnold's book, Patterns of Fashion 4, last night and finally noticed that there is only one
extant partlet, in plain linen, noted in the book.

Does anyone here know if there are any other extent partlets, plain or decorated, around?

Thank you,

 Kimiko Small
http://www.kimiko1.com
"Be the change you want to see in the world." ~ Ghandi

The Tudor Lady's Wardrobe pattern
http://www.margospatterns.com/
Sharon Collier | 1 May 03:07 2010

1940's doll with patterns

This probably won't show the pictures, but there is a 12" doll with patterns
from the 1940's. I thought someone might be interested. 
www.info@...
Lot # 16 

12" 1940s Mannequin doll in original box with patterns $200/300

  _____  

From: info@...
[mailto:info@...] 
Sent: Friday, April 30, 2010 1:04 PM
To: sharon@...
Subject: When is a half a whole?

 	

  <http://www.theriaults.com/images/email/050110-half.jpg> 
When it's a porcelain half doll, of course, and collectors seeking for rare
examples of these delightful novelty dolls will find a wonderful selection
at Theriault's estate doll auction in San Francisco this weekend on May 1.
Yes, that's tomorrow, 11 AM Pacific time. Here's a brief photographic survey
of a few of the lots. 
  <http://www.theriaults.com/images/email/050110-halfdolls1.jpg> 
And half dolls are only a very small part of the wonderful antique dolls
you'll find at the auction. French bebes, German characters, cloth studio
dolls, mignonettes, googlies, wooden dolls, and, quite literally, 300 other
wonderful antique dolls. 

To view all of the dolls in the auction
(Continue reading)

Penny Ladnier | 3 May 07:52 2010

Re: Victorian Hair:

I have an area online called A Brush with History, 
http://www.costumegallery.com/Hairstyles/Longhair/Women/menu.htm .  It 
features photographs of females with long hair and some of their hairstyles. 
The majority of the photos are from the Victorian period.  It is in a free 
access area of my Research Library.

Enjoy!  I had a blast creating it.
Penny Ladnier
Owner, The Costume Gallery Websites
www.costumegallery.com
14 websites of fashion, textiles, & costume history 
Penny Ladnier | 4 May 05:27 2010

Re: Victorian Hair: hair receptacle

Someone in another post mentioned hair receptacle.  I purchased an antique ceramic hair receptacle a few
months ago at an estate sale.  I have no idea how old it is.  It is in two pieces that are donut shaped they sit one
upon the other.  I have been collecting hair after washing my hair and brushing my hair the putting it in the
hair receptacle.  I have also collected my hair after having it trimmed.  It has taken me a couple of months to
fill the receptacle.  I am surprised how quickly it filled up.

Now, for making the rat...would it work best to place the hair in panty hose before using it in my hair?

Penny Ladnier
Owner, The Costume Gallery Websites
www.costumegallery.com
14 websites of fashion, textiles, & costume history 
Elizabeth Walpole | 4 May 05:53 2010
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Re: Victorian Hair: hair receptacle

On Tue, May 4, 2010 at 1:27 PM, Penny Ladnier <penny1a@...>wrote:

>
>
> Now, for making the rat...would it work best to place the hair in panty
> hose before using it in my hair?
>
>
I've heard 'invisible' hair nets plus some hairspray recommended by those
who've done it before. Pantyhose might work but one of the great benefits of
making a ratt from your own hair is that it is already colour matched.
Finding pantyhose to match your hair colour (especially if you're not a
brunette) is trickier.
Elizabeth
ladybeanofbunny1 | 4 May 07:01 2010
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Re: Victorian Hair: hair receptacle

Many years ago, about 6 now as a matter of fact, when I first decided to start growing my hair out I bought a
bakelite receiver from a local antique shop (it was all I could find and afford at the time) and start using
it. What I did was take the hair from the brush BEFORE washing and I should have cleaned it but hadn't thought
of it at the time. I ended up with a bag full of various sized rats and even tried the hair net approach but they
just never worked. Chances are I wasn't doing it right, making the pieces too small, etc. The final problem
in doing this was using them. I found it very difficult to put them in without them being loose and slipping
or coming through the hair styled over them. After these two posts though I might start over and wait until
there is a lot of hair and stuf
 f them really full to make big pieces. The hairspray is a good idea. Perhaps now that my hair is one colour
again (I had recently coloured it burgundy by accident) the rats won't show throu!
 gh as much as they had under blonde hair?

Justine J.
DVLGS Organizer
www.DVLGS.org

-----Original Message-----
From: Elizabeth Walpole &lt;elizabeth.r.walpole@...&gt;
To: Historical Costume &lt;h-costume@...&gt;
Sent: Mon, May 3, 2010 11:54 pm
Subject: Re: [h-cost] Victorian Hair: hair receptacle

 

 
On Tue, May 4, 2010 at 1:27 PM, Penny Ladnier
&lt;penny1a@...&gt;wrote: 

&gt; 
&gt; 
(Continue reading)

Marjorie Wilser | 4 May 07:32 2010
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Re: Victorian Hair: hair receptacle

Penny,

Panty hose nylon is murder to put hairpins through, and hatpins would  
just run it. Then there's the color issue already mentioned. I should  
think almost anything else would work better.

I would despair of ever getting a cover to match my own hair, which is  
now available in grayscale only (multiple shades) . . . :)

Wondering out loud though. I might try some of that product that's  
designed to make fabric out of threads- it has some proprietary name I  
can't recall. Not Stitch-n-tear. . . sheesh. . .

Ennyhow-- I'd try that, laying hair randomly across it and then fusing  
it. I think what's left is designed to wash out?? Somebody help me out  
here. Kayta? Do you recall the product name? It seems as if it might  
be ideal to contain your own hair, and would be made _from_ your own  
hair.

     == Marjorie Wilser (who'd go try it if there were a full-service  
fabric store in town!!)

=:=:=:Three Toad Press:=:=:=

"Learn to laugh at yourself and you will never lack for amusement." --MW

http://3toad.blogspot.com/

On May 3, 2010, at 8:27 PM, Penny Ladnier wrote:

(Continue reading)

Marjorie Wilser | 4 May 07:46 2010
Picon

Re: Victorian Hair: hair receptacle

Penny,

A little googling yielded the term "water soluble fusible" and the  
following (which doesn't seem exactly what I was trying to tell you  
about!!):

> There's a water-soluble fusible tape, called Wonder Tape, which  
> rinses out after construction is complete, and which therefore  
> doesn't change the character - stiffness or transparency - of the  
> fabric. It just holds things in place while you stitch them down -  
> hems, regular seams, or trims, etc. Again, your fabric must be  
> washable, and must be pre-shrunk before using the fusible tape.

Good product, not what I meant. Further googling included the term  
machine embroidery (since that was what brought it to mind):

Designed for machine embroidery. Dunno if it will hold hairs together  
after it's washed out:
http://www.amazon.com/Show-Fusible-Embroidery-Stabilizer-x10yd/dp/B0030MNU4S

And some articles I didn't have a chance to read- but look helpful:
http://www.needlepointers.com/ShowArticles.aspx?NavID=2047

I think I'm on the right track for my (untested!) theory though. Hope  
at least one of these is a winner!

     == Marjorie Wilser

=:=:=:Three Toad Press:=:=:=

(Continue reading)

Sharon Collier | 4 May 07:49 2010

Re: Victorian Hair: hair receptacle

You could try nylon net--bigger holes. Or "needle felt" the hair, like what
my son did at school for an art project. The needles have burrs on them
(something like that) so it felts the wool together. It might work on hair,
too. 

-----Original Message-----
From: h-costume-bounces@...
[mailto:h-costume-bounces@...] On
Behalf Of Marjorie Wilser
Sent: Monday, May 03, 2010 10:33 PM
To: Historical Costume
Subject: Re: [h-cost] Victorian Hair: hair receptacle

Penny,

Panty hose nylon is murder to put hairpins through, and hatpins would just
run it. Then there's the color issue already mentioned. I should think
almost anything else would work better.

I would despair of ever getting a cover to match my own hair, which is now
available in grayscale only (multiple shades) . . . :)

Wondering out loud though. I might try some of that product that's designed
to make fabric out of threads- it has some proprietary name I can't recall.
Not Stitch-n-tear. . . sheesh. . .

Ennyhow-- I'd try that, laying hair randomly across it and then fusing it. I
think what's left is designed to wash out?? Somebody help me out here.
Kayta? Do you recall the product name? It seems as if it might be ideal to
contain your own hair, and would be made _from_ your own hair.
(Continue reading)

Marjorie Wilser | 4 May 08:33 2010
Picon

Re: Victorian Hair: hair receptacle

But wool has scales on the fibres that help the felting process....  
hair doesn't. Nylon net. . . well, I don't want any of that stuff on  
my scalp :-D  (of course, this _is_ Penny's topic, not mine!)

     == Marjorie

On May 3, 2010, at 10:49 PM, Sharon Collier wrote:

> You could try nylon net--bigger holes. Or "needle felt" the hair,  
> like what
> my son did at school for an art project. The needles have burrs on  
> them
> (something like that) so it felts the wool together. It might work  
> on hair,
> too.

Gmane