madison moore | 1 Apr 18:01 2012
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CFP: Queer Nightlife Conference, Washington, D.C. August 1, 2012


CFP: MARRY THE NIGHT: NIGHTLIFE, PERFORMANCE AND QUEER WORLD MAKING

ASSOCIATION FOR THEATER IN HIGHER EDUCATION PRE-CONFERENCE, LGBTQ FOCUS GROUP, AUGUST 1, 2012

What is nightlife? What possibilities do queer night worlds afford? How to speak about the relationship between nightlife and (queer) theater and performance? How are LGBTQ identities created, maintained and performed at night? And in what ways do race, desire, and nightlife intersect?

MARRY THE NIGHT, a one-day Pre-Conference that will bridge the gap between scholarship, theater practice, popular culture, and public scholarship, aims to bring scholars and practitioners of queer night worlds together for a day of panels, performances, and embodied listening. Building out of recent scholarship in theater and performance studies by scholars such as Shane Vogel, Jose Muñoz, and Fiona Buckland, MARRY THE NIGHT interrogates the ways in which queer bodies experience the night. We seek 15-minute talks or performance pieces on an aspect of queer nightlife, broadly defined.

For performance pieces, please submit a CV, a 350-word proposal and images where possible, and for talks, please submit a brief CV and a 350-word abstract.

Both should be sent to MarryTheNightConference <at> gmail.com only. Submissions due by Sunday, May 6th 2012.


Paper topics may include, but are by no means limited to: 

Strip clubs
18+ nights
Splash (NYC), Cobalt (DC), Town (DC), Hydrate (Chicago), Rhonda (LA), Machine (Boston).
Drag performance
Voguing and house ball culture
Alternative queer nightlife
Gay clones
Queer fashion and nightlife
Lesbian bars
Gay neighborhoods
Cruising
Race, desire, and gay night world making 
Gay nightlife in historical perspective
Cabaret culture
Nightlife as theater
Policing queer nightlife
Queer night worlds and urban zoning 
Disco divas
Electronic dance music and remix culture 
Circuit parties
The “down low” 
John Sex, RuPaul, Divine, Leigh Bowery, James St. James 
The Mattachine Society 
Cabaret Laws
Red light districts 
Gay nightlife and gentrification 
Literary representations of gay nightlife
Nightlife and possibility 
Rural/suburban/small town gay night worlds (eg. non-big city)

_______________

madison moore, ph.d. candidate
american studies program
yale university 
new haven, ct
cell: 917.502.4687
email: madison.moore <at> yale.edu
web: www.madisonmooreonline.com


Joshua Comer | 2 Apr 06:59 2012
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How British and Continental theories came to the U.S.

Hello everyone,


I am working to better understand how different strands of British and Continental theory came to the U.S. and would love some suggestions along those lines.

I have come across some good writings on the Frankfurt School in the U.S., how Althusser and Gramsci's works came to become part of the CCCS curriculum in the 60s, and a bit on how the NLR has forged different scholarly connections, but I need to develop a broader grasp of the barriers and historical moments that have typified these transitions.

Please do let me know of anything that comes to mind in any proximity to how those relationships are formed or sustained (how different areas of European thought have intertwined, or how U.S. work has been received in Europe, for instance, would be just as welcome).

Thank you in advance for any help,

Joshua Comer
PhD Student
Communication and Rhetoric
Department of Language, Literature, and Communication
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Kovala Urpo | 2 Apr 08:11 2012
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VS: [CULTSTUD-L] How British and Continental theories came to the U.S.

Hello,

 

You probably kow this, but:

"Robert C. Holub: Crossing Borders: Reception Theory, Poststructuralism, Deconstruction" (Univ. of Wisconsin Press 1992)  might be relevant.

 

Urpo Kovala

Univ. of Jyväskylä.

 

Lähettäjä: A listserv devoted to Cultural Studies [CULTSTUD-L <at> LISTS.UMN.EDU] käyttäjän Joshua Comer [joshuacomer <at> GMAIL.COM] puolesta
Lähetetty: 2. huhtikuuta 2012 7:59
Vastaanottaja: CULTSTUD-L <at> LISTS.UMN.EDU
Aihe: [CULTSTUD-L] How British and Continental theories came to the U.S.

Hello everyone,

I am working to better understand how different strands of British and Continental theory came to the U.S. and would love some suggestions along those lines.

I have come across some good writings on the Frankfurt School in the U.S., how Althusser and Gramsci's works came to become part of the CCCS curriculum in the 60s, and a bit on how the NLR has forged different scholarly connections, but I need to develop a broader grasp of the barriers and historical moments that have typified these transitions.

Please do let me know of anything that comes to mind in any proximity to how those relationships are formed or sustained (how different areas of European thought have intertwined, or how U.S. work has been received in Europe, for instance, would be just as welcome).

Thank you in advance for any help,

Joshua Comer
PhD Student
Communication and Rhetoric
Department of Language, Literature, and Communication
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
clare birchall | 2 Apr 11:44 2012
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FW: Culture Machine: New Reviews

CULTURE MACHINE <http://www.culturemachine.net> is pleased to announce the publication of the following new book reviews:

PHILIPPE PIGNARRE & ISABELLE STENGERS (2011) CAPITALIST SORCERY: BREAKING THE SPELL. TRANS. & ED. ANDREW GOFFEY. BASINGSTOKE AND NEW YORK: PALGRAVE MACMILLAN.

Reviewed by Jay Murphy
 

The slim spine of Capitalist Sorcery, running to approximately 150 pages, belies the ambition of its agenda. A political intervention by writer, publisher and pharmaceutical activist Philippe Pignarre and the protean philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers, Capitalist Sorcery puts forth a detailed and thought-provoking pragmatics of resistance, and in the process rebuts the reliance on ‘universals’ proclaimed by thinkers such as Alain Badiou and Slavoj Zizek…

 

PETER TOOHEY (2011) BOREDOM: A LIVELY HISTORY. NEW HAVEN & LONDON: YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

Reviewed by Julian Jason Haladyn

The study of boredom is an increasingly rich and vital area of contemporary research, one in which our societal propensity for being bored is considered not simply a minor personal problem but rather an affective mode of being that represents a fundamental questioning of culture. Why is it that so many individuals consistently find their lives boring? …

 
JANET HALLEY & ANDREW PARKER (EDS) (2011) AFTER SEX? ON WRITING SINCE QUEER THEORY. DURHAM: DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

Reviewed by Dara Blumenthal

The rearing of queer theory since the 1990’s has resulted in an expansive and expressive field of study; a field that is marked not by its cohesiveness but by its fissures. Like Marxism, queer theory promised a revolution, but this time in terms of new ways of living and ‘doing’ identity and being in the (Western) world. This is, as yet, an unrealized vision for it was immediately usurped by the overarching individualistic culture of North American capitalism. Perhaps that is why After Sex? On Writing Since Queer Theory, edited by Janet Halley and Andrew Parker, is at once a timely and confusing addition to the conversation…

TO READ THE FULL REVIEWS:

1. Go to http://www.culturemachine.net

2. Click on the ‘Reviews’ heading right under the journal’s banner.

3. Click on the ‘PDF’ sign next to the review you are interested in.

CULTURE MACHINE http://www.culturemachine.net is an open-access peer-reviewed journal of cultural studies and cultural theory which publishes new work from both established figures and up-and-coming writers. It is fully refereed and has an International Editorial Advisory Board which includes Geoffrey Bennington, Robert Bernasconi, Sue Golding, Lawrence Grossberg, Peggy Kamuf, Alphonso Lingis, Meaghan Morris, Paul Patton, Mark Poster, Avital Ronell, Nicholas Royle, Tadeusz Slawek and Kenneth Surin.

 

Dr Clare Birchall
Lecturer in Cultural Studies
University of Kent

Reviews Editor Culture Machine: http://www.culturemachine.net/
Author of Knowledge Goes Pop (Berg) http://www.bergpublishers.com/?tabid=761
Co-editor of New Cultural Studies (EUP) http://www.amazon.com/New-Cultural-Studies-Adventures-Theory/dp/0820329606

 

antonio venezia | 2 Apr 18:41 2012
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CFP REMINDER - Comics & Cultural Theory


>From Akira to Žižek: Comics and Contemporary Cultural Theory Papers are invited for Studies in Comics
volume 3.2.  This special issue seeks to provide a forum for new articulations between comics studies and
contemporary cultural theory.  The importance and continued relevance of
post-structuralist/postmodernist thought, the Frankfurt school’s studies of mass culture,
McLuhan’s media theory and Bourdieu’s critical sociology are rightly acknowledged.  Such figures
dominate theoretical academic discourse on comics, as in other areas of cultural studies, often at the
expense of engagement with alternative strands of critical thinking.  Submissions are welcome from
scholars and enthusiasts that explore the conjunctions of comics and cultural theory.   These could be
engagements with the work of specific thinkers or emergent schools including, but not limited to: Bruno
Latour and ANT – Michel Serres – Paul Virilio – eco-criticism – thing theory - N. Katherine Hayles
– Teresa de Lauretis - Franco Moretti – Manuel De Landa – Manuel Castells - cognitive capitalism –
transmedia narratives – Giorgio Agamben – Édouard Gissant – Jacques Rancière – Friedrich
Kittler – non-representational theory - speculative realism/materialism - Alain Badiou – Zygmunt
Bauman – Rosi Braidotti – Antonio Negri – Jan van Dijk - affect theory – Lev Manovitch - Kojin
Karatani – visual culture studies - Slavoj Žižek... Articles should be 4,000-8,000 words from any
discipline with a strong critical focus.  Abstracts should be received by 1st May 2012 in the first
instance.  Please send 300 word abstracts to studiesincomics <at> googlemail.com and include the word
ARTICLE in the subject heading.  Please indicate the intended word count of the article.  Completed papers
will be required by 15th August 2012.  All submissions are peer reviewed and papers must be in English. 
Reviews of publications and exhibitions are also welcome, as are creative submissions, by the same
deadlines indicated above. Tony Venezia, guest editor 		 	   		  
_______________________________________________
CULTSTUD-L mailing list: CULTSTUD-L <at> lists.comm.umn.edu
http://lists.comm.umn.edu/mailman/listinfo/cultstud-l

Amy Pason | 2 Apr 18:54 2012
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Job opening: University of Nevada, Reno

This might be of interest to some folks on the list (or please pass along to those that might still be looking for employment).

Cheers,

Amy Pason, PhD (Search Chair)

University of Nevada, Reno

apason <at> unr.edu


UNIVERSITY OF NEVADA, RENO
POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT
(Beginning Fall 2012)

The University of Nevada, Reno invites applications for the position of Lecturer in Communication Studies. We seek a candidate who specializes in public campaigns, deliberation, small group decision making, political communication, argumentation, leadership, or persuasion to teach in our Public Advocacy and Civic Engagement Track.  Candidates will teach courses related to the above areas and other courses as needed by the program. The teaching load for the position is four courses per semester at the undergraduate level.  This annually renewable position is contingent on funding and performance for up to three years. An interest in creating learning environments for diverse populations is also desirable. Responsibilities also include departmental committee work as needed.  Research for publication is preferred but not required.

Applicants should submit the following electronically at E-Search- https://www.unrsearch.com/postings/10523 by April 12.  Cover letter, CV, teaching philosophy, unofficial transcripts, and contact information for references.  Preference will be given to applicants who hold the Ph.D. degree in speech communication or communication studies at the time of application. ABDs near completion will strongly be considered.  

The Communication Studies Division offers the B.A. degree and focuses on (a) relational dynamics, and (b) public advocacy and civic engagement. The Communication Studies Division also provides a significant service component for majors in other colleges. Website:  http://www.unr.edu/cla/commstudies/

The Communication Studies program is a separate division in The School of Social Research and Justice Studies. Other units in the School include the Grant Sawyer Center for Justice Studies, the Department of Sociology, and the Department of Criminal Justice. The School is a unit of the College of Liberal Arts.  Website:  http://www.unr.edu/ssrjs/

The University of Nevada, Reno is the flagship campus of the Nevada System of Higher Education with a student population of approximately 18,000. The university offers 70 M.A. and Ph.D. programs in nine colleges. Reno is a vibrant, growing city of 300,000 located on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, about 200 miles east of San Francisco. Northern Nevada and northern California offer a great variety of both winter and summer recreational activities. Reno is only 30-45 minutes from Lake Tahoe and several major ski resorts. As a popular tourist destination, Reno offers many dining, entertainment, and cultural activities. For more information about the city and the surrounding area, please visit www.cityofreno.com and www.visitrenotahoe.com.

Mark A Neumann | 2 Apr 21:26 2012

CFP: Wunderkino 2-Northeast Historic Film Summer Symposium

Hi, Everyone.

Just wanted remind all interested parties that the deadline is 
approaching for this CFP. Here's the link and I've pasted it below, too,
for all who are interested.

http://oldfilm.org/content/2012-symposium

best wishes, mark

Mark Neumann, PhD
Professor
School of Communication
Northern Arizona University
Flagstaff, AZ 86011
________________________________________
WUNDERKINO 2: On The Varieties of Cinematic Experience

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

13th Annual Northeast Historic Film Summer Symposium
Thursday, July 26 – Saturday, July 28, 2012

 Wunderkino (“wonder-cinema”) are moving images that ignite our curiosity and engagement, and help
us to rethink questions of creativity, complexity, rarity and the multiple uses and understandings we
might find in amateur and non-commercial films.

The 2012 Northeast Historic Film (NHF) Summer Symposium revisits the idea of Wunderkino, in a general call
for proposals that aim to inform and expand our understanding of amateur and non-theatrical film. In
2011, the NHF Summer Symposium focused on assembling a “cabinet of cinematic curiosities.” This
year, we are inviting proposals that feature amazing and extraordinary studies of amateur and
non-theatrical films that offer lessons about culture, heritage, history, geography, performance,
and the drama and comedy of social life. This year’s theme is an effort to draw upon the wide range of
approaches that scholars, artists, filmmakers, and archivists are bringing to the study and use of
amateur and non-theatrical film. We encourage (and expect) participants to incorporate interesting
moving image excerpts as part of their presentations. NHF houses a 125-seat cinema with 35mm, 16mm,
videotape, and DVD projection.

The NHF Summer Symposium is a multi-disciplinary gathering devoted to the history, theory, and
preservation of amateur and nontheatrical moving images.  For over a decade, the Symposium has been
bringing together archivists, scholars, and artists in an intimate setting for three days of viewing and
discussing lesser-known, amateur, and found films. NHF is located in Bucksport, a town of 5,000 on the
coast of Maine (for more info on NHF, please visit: http://www.oldfilm.org).  Presenters typically have
30-45 minutes in which to deliver their paper and engage in discussion with their colleagues. The
symposium is open to archivists, artists and scholars from all disciplines. Please be advised that NHF is
a non-profit organization. Unfortunately, we do not have resources to fund travel and lodging for
conference presenters and participants. All presenters and participants must register for the symposium.

Please send 250-500 word abstracts outlining your paper ideas and a brief c.v. to the symposium organizers
at the address below. We prefer e-mail submissions. We are happy to discuss your presentation ideas with
you in advance of a formal submission. The Symposium Program Committee will begin reviewing proposals on
April 11, 2012 and will finalize the program by May 11, 2012. Please send proposals and inquiries to: symposium <at> wunderkino.org
_______________________________________________
CULTSTUD-L mailing list: CULTSTUD-L <at> lists.comm.umn.edu
http://lists.comm.umn.edu/mailman/listinfo/cultstud-l

Darcey West Morris | 2 Apr 23:14 2012
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In Media Res - Collegiate Sports

This week’s In Media Res theme focus is Collegiate Sports (April 2-6).

Here's the line-up:
http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/

Monday, April 2, 2012 - Paul Eisenstein (Otterbein University) presents: On the Surprise of the Game

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - Scott Krzych (Colorado College) presents: College Football by the Numbers

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - Brian Price (University of Toronto) presents:The Sports Life of the Political

Thursday, April 5, 2012 - Todd McGowan (University of Vermont) presents: The Necessity of Overlooking Sex Scandals

Friday, April 6, 2012 - Robert Cavanagh (Northwestern University) presents: Bracketologos

Theme week organized by Adam Cottrel (Georgia State University).

There are new calls for curators on our website! Check it out - http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/current-calls

To receive links for each day’s posts and stay up to date on our latest calls for curators, please be sure
“like” our newly launched Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/mediacommons.inmediares

You can also follow us on Twitter at  <at> MC_IMR

For more information, please contact In Media Res at inmediares.gsu <at> gmail.com or email the Coordinating
Editor, Alisa Perren, at aperren <at> gsu.edu.

Best,
The In Media Res Team

_______________________________________________
CULTSTUD-L mailing list: CULTSTUD-L <at> lists.comm.umn.edu
http://lists.comm.umn.edu/mailman/listinfo/cultstud-l

Dr. Dane S. Claussen | 3 Apr 04:49 2012
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RE: In Media Res - Collegiate Sports


Is there any critical perspective, or is it all, pardon the word, cheerleading?  

> From: dwest8 <at> student.gsu.edu
> To: cultstud-l <at> lists.comm.umn.edu
> Date: Mon, 2 Apr 2012 21:14:55 +0000
> Subject: [cultstud-l] In Media Res - Collegiate Sports
> 
> This week’s In Media Res theme focus is Collegiate Sports (April 2-6).
> 
> Here's the line-up:
> http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/
> 
> Monday, April 2, 2012 - Paul Eisenstein (Otterbein University) presents: On the Surprise of the Game
> 
> Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - Scott Krzych (Colorado College) presents: College Football by the Numbers
> 
> Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - Brian Price (University of Toronto) presents:The Sports Life of the Political
> 
> Thursday, April 5, 2012 - Todd McGowan (University of Vermont) presents: The Necessity of Overlooking
Sex Scandals
> 
> Friday, April 6, 2012 - Robert Cavanagh (Northwestern University) presents: Bracketologos
> 
> Theme week organized by Adam Cottrel (Georgia State University).
> 
> There are new calls for curators on our website! Check it out - http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/current-calls
> 
> To receive links for each day’s posts and stay up to date on our latest calls for curators, please be sure
“like” our newly launched Facebook page:
> https://www.facebook.com/mediacommons.inmediares
> 
> You can also follow us on Twitter at  <at> MC_IMR
> 
> For more information, please contact In Media Res at inmediares.gsu <at> gmail.com or email the
Coordinating Editor, Alisa Perren, at aperren <at> gsu.edu.
> 
> Best,
> The In Media Res Team
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> CULTSTUD-L mailing list: CULTSTUD-L <at> lists.comm.umn.edu
> http://lists.comm.umn.edu/mailman/listinfo/cultstud-l
 		 	   		  
_______________________________________________
CULTSTUD-L mailing list: CULTSTUD-L <at> lists.comm.umn.edu
http://lists.comm.umn.edu/mailman/listinfo/cultstud-l

Darcey West Morris | 3 Apr 21:59 2012
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RE: In Media Res - Collegiate Sports

Thank you for your question, Dr. Claussen.  I encourage you to read the posts on collegiate sports this week
and respond in the comments section if you feel the author needs to engage more critically with the
subject.  Our chief aim with In Media Res is to promote discussion within the academic community, and I hope
you will take this opportunity to join in on this week's conversation.  In keeping with the unique format of
In Media Res, each post tackles the week’s theme from a different perspective. The purpose of our site is
to facilitate a dialogue amongst scholars and commenters that furthers our understanding of a specific
topic and encourages debate.

In case you are unfamiliar with In Media Res, it is a subset of Media Commons. In Media Res is committed to
experimentation with scholarly writing in a digital environment.  The goal of In Media Res is to
critically engage with media in an immediate and timely way, and we encourage our curators to investigate
issues within media studies as a discipline and analyze media's role within society from a theoretical
and scholarly approach.  If you would like to learn more about the In Media Res project, please visit our
website to learn more about how the site works and how In Media Res scholars engage with various critical
questions - http://mediacommons.futureofthebook.org/imr/about

Thank you,
The In Media Res Editorial Staff

_______________________________________________
CULTSTUD-L mailing list: CULTSTUD-L <at> lists.comm.umn.edu
http://lists.comm.umn.edu/mailman/listinfo/cultstud-l


Gmane