Tony Mitchell | 1 Oct 06:02 2006
Picon
Picon

Re: the smiths/morrissey/englishness

Check out Nabeel zuberi's book 'Sounds English' (Sth. Illinois Univ. Press) which has a great chapter
about the Smiths 
from an Anglo-Asian persepcetive ...

----- Original Message -----
From: "Sanjek, David" <DSanjek <at> BMI.com>
Date: Saturday, September 30, 2006 2:25 am
Subject: Re: [cultstud-l] the smiths/morrissey/englishness
To: Cultural Studies <cultstud-l <at> comm.umn.edu>

> One of the best music books I've read in a while, and one that
> specifically addresses national representation in music, is England Is
> Mine by Michael Bracewell. He's not a terribly well known writer here,
> but the opposite in GB. I looked it up on Amazon to see if there's an
> American edition, and they're only listing used copies starting at 
> $40.I got a hardback several trips ago to London. The cover caught 
> my eye,
> as it had images of Oscar Wilde and Tricky. He blends in film, music,
> literature and the visual arts. 
> 
> Also, though it's not contemporary, I'd look back at the work of Nik
> Cohn, esp. his early book known in the US as Rock at the Beginning. He
> also recently wrote an unpublished in the US travel book of the
> underbelly of GB called Yes We Have No. 
> 
> Last, again, an old source, but George Melly's Revolt into Style is
> interesting and talks in some cases about figures whom Morissey
> venerates. 
> 
> Have been deep in these guys for a book on pop music historiography 
(Continue reading)

Jeremy Hunsinger | 1 Oct 15:59 2006
Picon

chairperson position at pratt in cultural studies, etc.

here's an interesting position, repost and share as appropriate:

Position Summary:
Reporting to the dean of liberal arts and sciences, the chair  
oversees the curriculum, faculty, and day-to-day operations of the  
department. In addition to an imaginative freshman English sequence,  
the department offers a range of courses for non-majors in literature  
(primarily English and American), creative writing, communications,  
performance, music, foreign languages, and other fields of the  
humanities. The chair has intellectual and administrative leadership  
of a faculty who value their place in a college which primarily  
trains undergraduate and graduate students of art, design, and  
architecture; these students are often highly creative, as well as  
academically well prepared. The chair will be a person whose vision  
embraces the multiple talents of his/her faculty and the multiple  
possibilities for curriculum and program development for the  
department. He or she will provide leadership for the department's  
role in the Critical and Visual Studies program (housed in the  
Department of Social Science and Cultural Studies) and for new  
departmental initiatives, including new degree programs at the  
bachelor's and master's level.

Job Responsibilities:
- Supervise assistant to the chair.
- Oversee teaching assignments, course scheduling, faculty searches.
- Oversee faculty evaluation and faculty development.
- Convene departmental faculty meetings.
- Oversee curriculum revision and research on new degree possibilities
- Teach one course per semester.
- Undertake divisional and Institute committee service as assigned by  
(Continue reading)

David M Silver | 1 Oct 19:17 2006

new reviews in cyberculture studies (october 2006)

new reviews [ http://rccs.usfca.edu/booklist.asp ] for october 2006:

1. Communication Researchers and Policy-Making
Editor: Sandra Braman
Publisher: MIT Press, 2003
Review: Amin Alhassan
Author Response: Sandra Braman

2. Material Virtualities: Approaching Online Textual Embodiment
Author: Jenny Sunden
Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing, 2003
Review: Clarissa Lee
Author Response: Jenny Sunden

3. Star Trek: Technologies of Disappearance
Author: Alan N. Shapiro
Publisher: Avinus Verlag, 2004
Review: Radim Hladik
Author Response: Alan N. Shapiro

4. Technology and the Dream: Reflections on the Black Experience at MIT,
1941-1999
Author: Clarence G. Williams
Publisher: MIT Press, 2003
Review: Elizabeth F. Desnoyers-Colas

COMING SOON! reviews of: Computer Mediated Communication: Social
Interaction and the Internet; Culture + Technology: A Primer; Eloquent
Images: Word and Image in the Age of New Media; Figurski at Findhorn on
Acid; Half-Real: Video Games between Real Rules and Fictional Worlds;
(Continue reading)

Nilges, Mathias | 1 Oct 20:11 2006
Picon

CFP: Global Mediations: Post-Fordism and Transnational Literature (ACLA, 11/01/2006; 04/19-22/2007)

“Trans, Pan, Intra: Cultures in Contact”
The Annual Meeting of the American Comparative Literature Association
Puebla, Mexico (April 19-22, 2007)

Seminar: Global Mediations: Post-Fordism and Transnational Literature

This seminar intends to examine contemporary literary production with a
transnational, or global focus as mediations of the socioeconomic change
from Fordism to post-Fordism. As terms such as “globalization,” “Empire”
etc. are beginning to lose descriptive and analytical rigor, submissions
to this panel should examine contemporary literary production in relation
to the concrete social and economic changes underlying the transition into
post-Fordism in order to arrive at a more concretely grounded
interrogation of the engagement of current literary production with
current political economy (as broadly, heuristically alluded to by the
terminology mentioned above). It may then be even possible to
theoretically refine such popular analytical categories as
“globalization,” or even “multitude.” To that end this seminar invites
literary papers engaging with this theoretical issue, as well as purely
theoretical analyses of post-Fordist culture and political
economy/subjectivity.

Possible approaches to this topic may include:
-	cultural exchange in times of economic globalization
-	multiculturalism and post-Fordism
-	global determinations of local cultural and racial politics
-	the change of academic disciplines as determined by post-Fordism /
transformations in the local/global socioeconomic structure
-	the cultural politics of flexible accumulation
-	the significance of new models of political economy for contemporary
(Continue reading)

Deborah Hanan | 2 Oct 00:25 2006
Picon

CFP: CSA Panel – Agency, IT, Econ of Creativity

Seeking panelists interested in presenting on the issue of
“AGENCY, INTERACTIVE TECHNOLOGIES, AND THE ECONOMICS OF CREATIVITY”
at the Fifth Annual Meeting of the Cultural Studies Association (U.S.), to be held in
Portland, Oregon (Portland State University) April 19-21, 2007.

Although “media convergence” and “interactivity” are considered 21st-century buzzwords, the
terms represent concepts 
whose impacts cultural critics have debated for years. Each media era seems to breathlessly champion the
development 
of “new” technologies to enhance creativity, communication, and social interaction. Yet while some
scholars may valorize 
these technologies for their democratic potential and facilitation of production, others have
discussed these technologies 
in terms of their degradation of medium specificity and the economic devaluation of creative
professionals. 

We are soliciting critical and historical analyses engaging this conversation, and focusing on the way
convergence and 
interactive technologies impact the creative economic sector, the public sphere, political structures
and processes. From 
multiple perspectives, we would like this panel to consider interactivity and convergent technologies
used by the 
entertainment industries. We would like the panel to consider such queries as: What are the implications
of fan-
determined cultural productions? Are the entertainment industries’ utilizations of IT facilitating
new types of agency or 
distracting from the anti-democratic conditions of a consolidated, mega-corporate mediascape? Is the
interactive 
consumer becoming an over-determined factor in relation to creativity and cultural production? Are
there any significant 
(Continue reading)

jaustin | 2 Oct 00:46 2006
Picon

A geneology of "assemblage"?

My pardons for x-posting!

I recently read a journal article in which an emergent sexual
practice/subculture ("dogging" -- see citation below) was conceptualized as
(roughly) an assemblage of bodies, technologies, spaces, and antecedent sexual
practices and subcultures.

Although my research is concerned with well-established, long-standing, and
global subcultures (graffiti artists and goths), the "assemblages"
conceptualization might solve some on-going problems with the way that youth
subcultures have been framed (in past and recent scholarship), while also
accounting for local variations. I write to ask:

*What are the key readings for understanding the geneology of "assemblage" as a
way of framing cultural practices/communities?

*Are you aware of any scholarship dealing with subcultures (youth or otherwise)
that put this framework to use?

Thanx for the always-insightful responses of the academic e-communities! Please
respond on-list!

love and kisses,

joe austin, history, uw-milwaukee, usa

David Bell, "Bodies, Technologies, Spaces: On 'Dogging'" _Sexualities_ (2006),
vol9(4): 387-407.

_______________________________________________
(Continue reading)

Lisa Manter | 2 Oct 06:56 2006

Camp Conference, San Francisco State University, October 28-29, 2006


Many Camps:
A Conference on Subcultures and the Arts of Survival

Saturday, October 28 -
Sunday, October 29, 2006

Keynote Speaker: Fabio Cleto University of Bergamo, Italy.
	
Attendance fee: $35

“[Camp is] terribly hard to define. You have to meditate on it and feel 
it intuitively, like Laotse's Tao. . . . Once you've done that, you'll 
find yourself wanting to use the word whenever you discuss aesthetics 
or philosophy or almost anything.  I never can understand how critics 
manage to do without it.”
-Christopher Isherwood,
The World in the Evening (1952)

Camp may be hard to define, but camp theorists have not given up 
trying.  It proceeds from the suffering of oppressed groups as they 
take on stereotypes and choose to perform them as an expression of 
identity or empowerment.  This initial statement is not meant as a 
limit as much as it is a provocation to questions and challenges:  Do 
camp performances advance the cause of the oppressed groups who use 
them?  Is it purely a sensibility or aesthetic, or does camp proceed 
from a deeper ethical or philosophical stance?   What are camp’s roots? 
 Does it rightly belong to gay culture? Who can perform it and when? 
 Can the privileged or mainstream perform camp? To whom are its 
performances directed?  How does one judge the success or failure of 
(Continue reading)

Lisa Manter | 2 Oct 07:08 2006

Camp Studies Conference, San Francisco State University, October 28-29, 3006


Many Camps:
A Conference on Subcultures and the Arts of Survival

Saturday, October 28 -
Sunday, October 29, 2006

Keynote Speaker: Fabio Cleto University of Bergamo, Italy.
	
Attendance fee: $35

“[Camp is] terribly hard to define. You have to meditate on it and feel 
it intuitively, like Laotse's Tao. . . . Once you've done that, you'll 
find yourself wanting to use the word whenever you discuss aesthetics 
or philosophy or almost anything.  I never can understand how critics 
manage to do without it.”
-Christopher Isherwood,
The World in the Evening (1952)

Camp may be hard to define, but camp theorists have not given up 
trying.  It proceeds from the suffering of oppressed groups as they 
take on stereotypes and choose to perform them as an expression of 
identity or empowerment.  This initial statement is not meant as a 
limit as much as it is a provocation to questions and challenges:  Do 
camp performances advance the cause of the oppressed groups who use 
them?  Is it purely a sensibility or aesthetic, or does camp proceed 
from a deeper ethical or philosophical stance?   What are camp’s roots? 
 Does it rightly belong to gay culture? Who can perform it and when? 
 Can the privileged or mainstream perform camp? To whom are its 
performances directed?  How does one judge the success or failure of 
(Continue reading)

Gary Hall | 2 Oct 11:18 2006
Picon

Culture Machine: New Review, Book and Deposits

CULTURE MACHINE <http://www.culturemachine.net> is pleased to announce
the publication of the following:

1. NEW BOOK REVIEW:

* Timothy Clark (2005), The Poetics of Singularity: The
Counter-Culturalist Turn in Heidegger, Derrida, Blanchot and the Later
Gadamer. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Reviewed by Robert
Eaglestone.

Timothy Clark is one of the best-kept secrets of British intellectual
and literary-theoretical life. Quietly working away, specialising in the
fertile ground which mixes Romanticism, European philosophy and literary
theory, he has produced some of the most striking and demanding work in
this field in English…. Clark’s work in general is characterised by
scholarly care and scrupulous attention, by a commitment to its own
motivation and movement and by its wide range of reference and scope of
thought ... The Poetics of Singularity takes it place as one of the most
thoughtful and meticulous works in what it calls, uneasily, the ‘school
of singularity’ and what others have named the ‘New Aestheticism’. This
name brings together a number of fairly disparate thinkers and finds in
them a central idea: that art is not simply re- or pre-baked ideology,
but something important, revelatory and foundational in its own right….

The review is available at:
http://culturemachine.tees.ac.uk/bk_rev.htm

------------------------------------------------------------------
2. NEW BOOK IN THE CULTURE MACHINE SERIES:

(Continue reading)

m-graziano | 2 Oct 08:30 2006

Re: A geneology of "assemblage"?

Joe,

Historian/sociologist/philosopher of technology Bruno Latour is all about the assemblages 
and assemblies.  Check out his new book 're-assembling the social' for a good place to 
start.
 also look at his website - http://www.ensmp.fr/~latour/
You might also check the 'actor-network resource' at: 
http://www.lancs.ac.uk/fass/centres/css/ant/index.htm

best,

mike
==============Original message text===============
On Sun, 01 Oct 2006 11:46:39 pm +0100 jaustin <at> uwm.edu wrote:

My pardons for x-posting!

I recently read a journal article in which an emergent sexual
practice/subculture ("dogging" -- see citation below) was conceptualized as
(roughly) an assemblage of bodies, technologies, spaces, and antecedent sexual
practices and subcultures.

Although my research is concerned with well-established, long-standing, and
global subcultures (graffiti artists and goths), the "assemblages"
conceptualization might solve some on-going problems with the way that youth
subcultures have been framed (in past and recent scholarship), while also
accounting for local variations. I write to ask:

*What are the key readings for understanding the geneology of "assemblage" as a
way of framing cultural practices/communities?
(Continue reading)


Gmane