Keith Trexler | 21 Aug 01:44 2014

Zen Garden

A few months ago I asked the list for help in finding the aggregate needed for a Zen garden, some of the tips
were quite helpful.  One inquiry led to another, and eventually I was able to find a source of the right
stuff several hundred miles away in Vermont.
It's a crushed limestone product they call 1/8" Filler Stone - similar to poultry grit, it's used as a filler
in fertilizer compounds.

I needed about 12 tons of it, and though it only cost $18 per ton, the trucking cost to get it here was pretty
steep.  

Anyway, I want to thank you again for your help and positive words of encouragement.  I managed to finish
the garden just hours before my wedding (we planned to have guests walk in procession through the garden to
get to the quarry).  In case you're interested, I chronicled the project of building a Zen garden
(including making my own rakes cuz ya can't buy them at Home Depot) in my online photo album here:

www.picasaweb.com/quarrytrex

Cheers,
-Keith Trexler

 
John Grablewski | 4 Aug 14:56 2014
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Grease stain

Hello all
I installed a patio using cut limestone 
And the homeowner recently dropped a piece of chicken on the patio! How, if possible, can you clean or draw
the stain out of the stone? Cleaners or sanding? Thanks in advance!

John Grablewski
Sent from my iPhone 
Peggy B Perazzo | 4 Aug 02:00 2014
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New 1922 Monumental Publications added to Stone Quarries & Beyond web site

Hello everyone:
Below is a link to the new 1922 Vermont Marble Co. monument book and 
price lists that I have added to our web site, Stone Quarries and 
Beyond, recently that you might be interested in seeing:

"Modern Memorials in Marble,"  Illustrating designs for various 
monumental purposes with numerous examples of the use of marble in 
both ancient and modern times, Vermont Marble Company, Proctor, 
Vermont, designed, engraved, and printed in Bartlett Orr Press, New 
York, 1922.  (Includes price list for this 1922 monument 
catalog/book)

http://quarriesandbeyond.org/states/vt/pdf/modern_memorials_in_marble_and_price_list_vermont_marble_co_1922.pdf 

Peggy B. Perazzo
pbperazzo@...
Brentwood, CA
Stone Quarries and Beyond
http://quarriesandbeyond.org/

New additions to our web site will be listed on our Facebook page, 
which is open to the public.  (You do not need to join Facebook to 
view the new additions.  You only need to join Facebook if you want 
to receive automatic notifications of new additions.)
http://www.facebook.com/StoneQuarriesAndBeyond

 
Peggy B Perazzo | 21 Jul 01:18 2014
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"The Monumental Cemetery of Milan," Italy (1895)

Below is an article added to the "cemetery" section of our web site, 
Stone Quarries and Beyond:
"The Monumental Cemetery of Milan" Italy, in "The Monumental News," 
Vol. 7, #11, November 1895, pp. 680-682.

http://quarriesandbeyond.org/cemeteries_and_monumental_art/pdf/monumental_cemetery_of_milan_italy_monumental_news_nov_1895.pdf 

Photo captions:

       "Entrance to Monumental Cemetery, Milan, Italy"
       "View in Monumental Cemetery, Milan"
       "From a monument in Monumental Cemetery, Milan"
       "Monument in the Monumental Cemetery, Milan"

Peggy B. Perazzo
pbperazzo@...
Stone Quarries and Beyond
http://quarriesandbeyond.org/

New additions to our web site will be listed on our Facebook page, 
which is open to the public.  (You do not need to join Facebook to 
view the new additions.  You only need to join Facebook if you want 
to receive automatic notifications of new additions.)
http://www.facebook.com/StoneQuarriesAndBeyond  

 
Peggy B Perazzo | 19 Jul 23:29 2014
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"New Style Rock Work" Monumental Catalog, 1890s (Massachusetts)

Some of these old engravings from the 1890s cemetery monument catalog 
that I just added to our web site, Stone Quarries and Beyond, might 
be of interest:
Charles Clements Wholesale Granite Dealer - "New Style Rock Work" 
Cemetery Monumental Catalog, 1890s, 372-378 Boylston Street, Boston, 
Massachusetts - 36 La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois - Quarry, West 
Quincy, Mass. - Foreign Office Aberdeen,
Scotland.
http://quarriesandbeyond.org/cemeteries_and_monumental_art/pdf/charles_clements_new_style_rock_work_cemetery_monument_catalog_1890s.pdf 

If anyone wants high-resolution images of any of these monuments, let me know.

Peggy B. Perazzo
pbperazzo@...
Stone Quarries and Beyond
http://quarriesandbeyond.org/

New additions to our web site will be listed on our Facebook page, 
which is open to the public.  (You do not need to join Facebook to 
view the new additions.  You only need to join Facebook if you want 
to receive automatic notifications of new additions.)
http://www.facebook.com/StoneQuarriesAndBeyond  

 
| 19 Jul 20:51 2014

Re: [stone]Rock facing thank you...

Hi David
Thank you for the response...good info there!
I do have a few of the chisels you mentioned and they are most likely  older
than I, and that's old...they are not carbide but I have the means to clean 
 'em
up and sharpen.
My "go to" is a 2 1/2# hand sledge...just right.
My difficulty has been the angle to hold the masons chipper?, which is  
front/back?,
how far back to start the chiseling?....so far with the feedback here I  
have these
questions answered...however...I am wholeheartedly in agreement with  George
that watching someone do it and actually doing under their guidance  
(Lesson)
is the fast track to learning.
The T & H videos were a help but I don't mess with granite and find it  
better to leave that to
others.
I do live fairly close to Briar Hill (North Canton) and am planning a  
buying trip there...
maybe I could sneak a peak on someone dressing stone. ;>)
When I was in the "business" we dealt primarily in Barn, Building, and  
Bridge Stone.
Also "sidewalk stone", curbing (Sandstone types and granite types) as  well 
as
Grindstones (visited an abandoned quarry years back...took many pics...but  
that's another story)
Ohio has a very interesting history of quarries and you are absolutely  
correct in
the variations one finds coming out of various locations in Ohio... as well 
(Continue reading)

| 19 Jul 14:00 2014

Rock facing thank you...

Many thanks to both George and Dave for their response...
The video's, Dave, are indeed a great help and have given me some  insight
regarding tool usage...thank you!
And George, if I were to take a lesson in stone carving...boy, what an  
offer!
If I were a little younger I would crank up old "Betsy" and be on my  way!
Thank you also! (I did put this in my "bucket" tho)
Most of what I do is "rough and fine pointed" and as I mentioned before  
"rustic".
My interest in rock or pitch facing is dressing the saw cuts to come  close
to replicating or at least "soften" the look of the barn stone which in  
this area
is predominately sandstone.
what ends up with all my whackin' n bangin' are pieces for gardens  such
as...bird baths, planters, benches, water features and the odd "garden art" 
 piece.
I have a lot of fun with it and don't treat it as "life sustaining" other  
than
the spiritual support through the appreciation of my observers and  
sometimes
customers.
Having read many of the postings here I find myself in good company  with
many who have the love of stone and the desire to create something  that
has the ability to live on well beyond the life span of its' creator.
Carve on y'all...
Bob in Ohio (Stonebob)

 

 
(Continue reading)

| 18 Jul 16:11 2014

Rock facing

Appeal to the list...
I have always been intrigued with the looks of a rock faced barn  
stone...luv it!
Over the years of selling barn stone I have found the rock face dressed  
stone to be
the most popular to my customers.
There have been times that I have attempted to replicate rock facing on a  
fresh cut
(with diamond saw) sand stone with, IMHO, minimal satisfactory  results.
Questions...
I have found in the wild pitching wedge chisels in different widths,  is 
there a rule of thumb 
on the application of each?
There is a thickness to the end of that chisel that is on an angle...is  
that angle placed 
flat on the stone or the edge of the angle only and if only the edge, why  
not use a
conventional chisel to do the same thing?
Also, what is the front of a pitching wedge?
I know that a line is score parallel to the front edge of the stone to be  
rock faced and
am pretty sure there must be a formula for the distance back from that  
face?
Having always been a "rustic" kinda guy when it comes to carving you sort  
get an
idea where I'm coming from so apologies to the advanced herein...but I  
guess that's
how yuh learn.
Thanking y'all in advance...
Bob in Ohio 
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Walter S. Arnold | 17 Jul 15:08 2014

Re: "Rock-Faced Monuments," edited by Harry A. Bliss, 1919

Another method sometimes uses is to start with a split faced quarry 
block, then carve the ornamentation into the middle. In that case the 
carving will generally be recessed from the splitface surface, rather 
than projecting out. You'll see that in some of Peggy's examples.

Walter S. Arnold  * walter@...
http://stonecarver.com

 
Peggy B Perazzo | 17 Jul 02:06 2014
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"Rock-Faced Monuments," edited by Harry A. Bliss, 1919

I've just added a hard-to-find book to our web 
site, Stone Quarries and Beyond, that you might be interested in:
"Rock-Faced Monuments,"  Illustrations and 
Descriptions of Some of the Best Examples of 
Rock-Faced Memorials, Edited and Arranged by 
Harry A. Bliss, Publisher, Press of the Monument 
and Cemetery Review, Buffalo, New York, 
1919.  (Excerpt from the Forward:  "This book, 
Rock-Faced Monuments, is published with the 
purpose of supplying to the granite industry a 
practical volume illustrating some of the best 
work in rock-faced memorials.  It Is designed 
especially as a book of suggestions and 
comparative illustrations for monument dealers, 
designers and salesmen, but the illustrations are also of general
interest….")
http://quarriesandbeyond.org/cemeteries_and_monumental_art/pdf/rock-faced_monuments_by_harry_a_bliss_1919.pdf 

Peggy B. Perazzo
pbperazzo@...
Stone Quarries and Beyond
http://quarriesandbeyond.org/

New additions to our web site will be listed on 
our Facebook page, which is open to the 
public.  (You do not need to join Facebook to 
view the new additions.  You only need to join 
Facebook if you want to receive automatic notifications of new additions.)
http://www.facebook.com/StoneQuarriesAndBeyond  

(Continue reading)

Peggy B Perazzo | 11 Jul 23:03 2014
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"Design Hints for Memorial Craftsmen" - 1933 & 1934 (2 new issues)

Hello everyone:
I obtained 2 more editions of the magazine: 
"Design Hints for the Memorial Craftsmen"

1.

<http://quarriesandbeyond.org/pdf/design_hints_for_memorial_craftsmen_november_1933.pdf>Design 
Hints for Memorial Craftsmen, November 1933, Vol. 9, No. 9
      http://quarriesandbeyond.org/pdf/design_hints_for_memorial_craftsmen_november_1933.pdf

      Article of possible interest in the book:

      *  "The Psychology of Salesmanship," by 
Major John K. Shawvan, Director of Chicago Model Library

2. 
<http://quarriesandbeyond.org/pdf/design_hints_for_memorial_craftsmen_may_1934.pdf>Design 
Hints for Memorial Craftsmen, May 1934, Vol. 9, No. 10
      http://quarriesandbeyond.org/pdf/design_hints_for_memorial_craftsmen_may_1934.pdf

      Article of possible interest in the book:

      *  "Memorial Contract – Bill of Sale"

The list of all of the editions of the "Design 
Hints for Memorial Craftsmen" that I have in my 
collection so far is available at the following 
link on our Stone Quarries and Beyond web site:
http://quarriesandbeyond.org/methods_and_tools_design_hints_mags_list.html

(Continue reading)


Gmane