Alison Dellit | 1 Aug 06:12 2006
Picon

Catalogues and maps

If anyone has any experience with developing new interfaces/functionality for providing access to maps through OPACs (or any catalogue really), I'd be really interested in hearing about it off list…

We're struggling a bit to work out how to deal with a mostly uncatalogued collection, and a not-very-map-friendly OPAC.

Alison

Alison Dellit | National Library of Australia | Canberra ACT 2600
Ph 02 6262 1216 | adellit <at> nla.gov.au  | http://www.nla.gov.au

Jacobs, Jane W | 1 Aug 13:41 2006

Re: Catalogues and maps

Please CC me in on that offlist conversation.

Thanks.

JJ

 

**Views expressed by the author do not necessarily represent those of the Queens Library.**

 

Jane Jacobs

Asst. Coord., Catalog Division

Queens Borough Public Library

89-11 Merrick Blvd.

Jamaica, NY 11432

tel.: (718) 990-0804

 

e-mail: Jane.W.Jacobs <at> queenslibrary.org

FAX (718) 990-8566






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From: Next generation catalogs for libraries [mailto:NGC4LIB <at> listserv.nd.edu] On Behalf Of Alison Dellit
Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2006 12:12 AM
To: NGC4LIB <at> listserv.nd.edu
Subject: Catalogues and maps

 

If anyone has any experience with developing new interfaces/functionality for providing access to maps through OPACs (or any catalogue really), I'd be really interested in hearing about it off list…

We're struggling a bit to work out how to deal with a mostly uncatalogued collection, and a not-very-map-friendly OPAC.

Alison

Alison Dellit | National Library of Australia | Canberra ACT 2600
Ph 02 6262 1216 | adellit <at> nla.gov.au  | http://www.nla.gov.au

Andrews, Mark J. | 3 Aug 16:55 2006
Picon

Six questions

Hi, everyone.  It’s been quiet around here (vacations?), so I thought I’d ask a few questions.  For once I’m more interested in listing than shouting from my soap box, so I’d be grateful for your take on these questions:

 

  1. A brilliant library sys-admin friend of mine said “Its clear libraries, librarians and librarianship are changing.  What they are changing into is not so clear.”  What do you think?

  2. How do you identify changing user needs in your organization?

  3. Having identified changing user needs, how to incorporate these new needs into you leadership, management and planning?

  4. How do you meet the new needs you’ve identified?  What part does technology play, if any, in planning to meet the new needs you’ve identified?

  5. Who is doing a good job of this inside and outside the library profession?

  6. Bonus question:  Are you familiar with David Cooperrider’s “Appreciative Inquiry” methodology?  See http://appreciativeinquiry.case.edu/ for more information.

 

Thanks,

 

Mark Andrews

Creighton University

Kevin Kierans | 3 Aug 22:13 2006
Picon

graphical book browsing on the OPAC

Hello all.
Has anyone done or seen a visual way to browse thumbnail covers in a opac
in shelf order, that somehow simulates (or betters) the physical experience of "browsing
the shelves?"
 
What you can "get" from physical browsing:
  Size of the book (thickness[number of pages] , height)
  Wear and tear on the book: It's new!  It's beat up so probably old.
  The call number in mostly the same place on the spine of the book.
  The format: (trade paper, hardcover etc.)
  The title and author (if you read sideways, and the spine label doesn't cover it)
  Some notion of what the cover might look like (colour, typeface, design)
 
Then of course you can pull the book out and see the cover and back and the TOC and.
 
I suppose you could just line up the thumbnails along with some data below or above...
But I was thinking of something "cooler,"  a jukebox type display, or...?
 
 
Kevin
Ryan Eby | 3 Aug 22:21 2006
Picon

Re: graphical book browsing on the OPAC

Here's a basic one built for AADL. You could probably build something
like what your saying using Flash and have it be more elaborate.

http://www.monkey.org/~emv/superpatron/aadlnewfiction.html

Ryan Eby

On 8/3/06, Kevin Kierans <kevink <at> tnrdlib.bc.ca> wrote:
>
>
> Hello all.
> Has anyone done or seen a visual way to browse thumbnail covers in a opac
> in shelf order, that somehow simulates (or betters) the physical experience
> of "browsing
> the shelves?"
>
> What you can "get" from physical browsing:
>   Size of the book (thickness[number of pages] , height)
>   Wear and tear on the book: It's new!  It's beat up so probably old.
>   The call number in mostly the same place on the spine of the book.
>   The format: (trade paper, hardcover etc.)
>   The title and author (if you read sideways, and the spine label doesn't
> cover it)
>   Some notion of what the cover might look like (colour, typeface, design)
>
> Then of course you can pull the book out and see the cover and back and the
> TOC and.
>
> I suppose you could just line up the thumbnails along with some data below
> or above...
> But I was thinking of something "cooler,"  a jukebox type display, or...?
>
>
> Kevin

DavidSVoros | 3 Aug 22:31 2006

Re: graphical book browsing on the OPAC

This looks great. How was it done?

Ryan Eby wrote:

> Here's a basic one built for AADL. You could probably build something
> like what your saying using Flash and have it be more elaborate.
>
> http://www.monkey.org/~emv/superpatron/aadlnewfiction.html
>
> Ryan Eby
>
> On 8/3/06, Kevin Kierans <kevink <at> tnrdlib.bc.ca> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> Hello all.
>> Has anyone done or seen a visual way to browse thumbnail covers in a
>> opac
>> in shelf order, that somehow simulates (or betters) the physical
>> experience
>> of "browsing
>> the shelves?"
>>
>> What you can "get" from physical browsing:
>>   Size of the book (thickness[number of pages] , height)
>>   Wear and tear on the book: It's new!  It's beat up so probably old.
>>   The call number in mostly the same place on the spine of the book.
>>   The format: (trade paper, hardcover etc.)
>>   The title and author (if you read sideways, and the spine label
>> doesn't
>> cover it)
>>   Some notion of what the cover might look like (colour, typeface,
>> design)
>>
>> Then of course you can pull the book out and see the cover and back
>> and the
>> TOC and.
>>
>> I suppose you could just line up the thumbnails along with some data
>> below
>> or above...
>> But I was thinking of something "cooler,"  a jukebox type display,
>> or...?
>>
>>
>> Kevin
>
>

--
David Voros
Dean of Learning Resources & Information Technology
Lehigh Carbon Community College
4525 Education Park Drive
Schnecksville, PA 18078
(610)799-1164
"Ancora Imparo"

Ryan Eby | 3 Aug 22:44 2006
Picon

Re: graphical book browsing on the OPAC

It was done by Edward Vielmetti using the new books RSS feed. His blog
post is here:

http://vielmetti.typepad.com/superpatron/2005/12/visual_wall_of_.html

If you catalog provides some sort of Data API then you could probably
build it off that and have it be a bit more complex. III has an xml
server and I believe other vendors offer SQL access.

Ryan Eby

On 8/3/06, DavidSVoros <dvoros <at> lccc.edu> wrote:
> This looks great. How was it done?
>
> Ryan Eby wrote:
>
> > Here's a basic one built for AADL. You could probably build something
> > like what your saying using Flash and have it be more elaborate.
> >
> > http://www.monkey.org/~emv/superpatron/aadlnewfiction.html
> >
> > Ryan Eby
> >
> > On 8/3/06, Kevin Kierans <kevink <at> tnrdlib.bc.ca> wrote:
> >
> >>
> >>
> >> Hello all.
> >> Has anyone done or seen a visual way to browse thumbnail covers in a
> >> opac
> >> in shelf order, that somehow simulates (or betters) the physical
> >> experience
> >> of "browsing
> >> the shelves?"
> >>
> >> What you can "get" from physical browsing:
> >>   Size of the book (thickness[number of pages] , height)
> >>   Wear and tear on the book: It's new!  It's beat up so probably old.
> >>   The call number in mostly the same place on the spine of the book.
> >>   The format: (trade paper, hardcover etc.)
> >>   The title and author (if you read sideways, and the spine label
> >> doesn't
> >> cover it)
> >>   Some notion of what the cover might look like (colour, typeface,
> >> design)
> >>
> >> Then of course you can pull the book out and see the cover and back
> >> and the
> >> TOC and.
> >>
> >> I suppose you could just line up the thumbnails along with some data
> >> below
> >> or above...
> >> But I was thinking of something "cooler,"  a jukebox type display,
> >> or...?
> >>
> >>
> >> Kevin
> >
> >
>
> --
> David Voros
> Dean of Learning Resources & Information Technology
> Lehigh Carbon Community College
> 4525 Education Park Drive
> Schnecksville, PA 18078
> (610)799-1164
> "Ancora Imparo"
>

Kevin Kierans | 3 Aug 23:52 2006
Picon

Re: graphical book browsing on the OPAC

Re:
>>Here's a basic one built for AADL. You could probably build something
>>like what your saying using Flash and have it be more elaborate.

>>http://www.monkey.org/~emv/superpatron/aadlnewfiction.html

The following html does something similar, with a bit more info in the html
img/title tag:
Kevin

<html>
<head>
<title>Catalogue Search Results</title>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
</head>
<body>
Hover mouse pointer over thumbnail picture for more information about the
item.
<br>
Click the thumbnail to place a hold or to see full record. (Not live at this
point)
<hr>
<img
src="http://syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=0553803441/sc.gif&client=tnrdp&typ
e=hw7"
title="Killer Dreams by Johansen | Status:available | PubDate:1999 | Lent 99
times" alt="thumbnail" height =" 94" width ="64" border="1"
</a>
<img
src="http://syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=0385338325/sc.gif&client=tnrdp&typ
e=hw7" alt="thumbnail" height =" 94" width ="64" border="1"
title="Coming Out by Danielle Steel | Status:available | PubDate:1999 | Lent
99 times"
</a>
<img
src="http://syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=1416505474/sc.gif&client=tnrdp&typ
e=hw7" alt="thumbnail" height =" 94" width ="64" border="1"
title="Captive My Desires by Johanna Lindsey | Status:available |
PubDate:1999 | Lent 99 times"
</a>

<!--The following book has no thumbnail cover.  Syndetics returns a blank
(one pixel) picture in that case-->

<img
src="http://syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=038xxx8xxx/sc.gif&client=tnrdp&typ
e=hw7" alt="thumbnail" height =" 94" width ="64" border="1"
title="Book Title by Author | Status:available | PubDate:1999 | Lent 99
times">
</a>
<img
src="http://syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=0399153519/sc.gif&client=tnrdp&typ
e=hw7" alt="thumbnail" height =" 94" width ="64" border="1"
title="Lovely Lying Lips by Robert B. Parker | Status:available |
PubDate:1999 | Lent 99 times">
</a>
<img
src="http://syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9780553804799/sc.gif&client=tnrdp&
type=hw7" alt="thumbnail" height =" 94" width ="64" border="1"
title="Book Title by Author | Status:available | PubDate:1999 | Lent 99
times">
</a>
<img
src="http://syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=1416505474/sc.gif&client=tnrdp&typ
e=hw7" alt="thumbnail" height =" 94" width ="64" border="1"
title="Put whatever information you want here.  There is a limit to the
number of characters that will be displayed."
</a>
</body>
</html>

Alexander Johannesen | 4 Aug 02:16 2006
Picon

Re: Six questions

Hiya,

On 8/4/06, Andrews, Mark J. <MarkAndrews <at> creighton.edu> wrote:
> "Its clear libraries, librarians and librarianship are changing.  What they are
> changing into is not so clear."  What do you think?

Yup, we have no idea where we're going or what we're supposed to do ;
we're going to new places with an old map. (And boy, libraries have
the most amount of old maps I've ever seen; LG1 is stacked to the roof
with the darn things, pretty as they are)

> How do you identify changing user needs in your organization?

Some whinging, some screaming, mostly discussion. Seriously though,
user testing as often as I can. Usability ; test your users, test your
assumptions, and adapt your ideas, strategies and technology based on
that.

> Having identified changing user needs, how to incorporate these new needs
> into you leadership, management and planning?

Look at the old systems and change their definition and specification
over time, discuss with partners, adopt new plan, perform an upgrade /
decomissioning, rinse, repeat. But the thing is - and this is the big
one! - you have got to have the right people to do it. You need people
to embrqace the idea that their world is changing, and I'm not sure
you can enforce this type of thinking through any means of coursing,
cursing, pushing or shoving. If people are allergic to change, they
shouldn't be in a position to make strategic decisions (pet theory on
good management).

> How do you meet the new needs you've identified?  What part does technology
> play, if any, in planning to meet the new needs you've identified?

Test your users, adapt your technology. There are times when this
theory fails, but our librarians keep surprising me with their ability
to accept change. To meet the needs of the test results I tend to
directly integrate them into my plans through user-centred design,
which is easy and affordable. If upstairs approaval is needed, the
test results always have a swaying effect. Always. Wave them around a
bit, talk about it. In fact, you should always do this so that this
info trickles into higher-order strategies.

> Who is doing a good job of this inside and outside the library profession?

I don't want to name names here, but simply say that it all comes down
to the individual person in a specific context. There are good and bad
people doing things both inside and out. After all the soap-boxes that
has been worn out lately in our "field" one would have the impression
of a certain group of people being pro-active (and hence good?) here,
but in my experience there's a lot of really good work being done by
invisible and totally silent people, and to tell the truth, I'd love
to give them more praise.

> Bonus question:  Are you familiar with David Cooperrider's "Appreciative
> Inquiry" methodology?

Hmm, sounds like a plug. :) I've heard about it, and now reading about
it (creepy website, though ; new age and poor accessibility ... oh,
and poor writing, too :) it's just basically Gaia in management.
There's hundreds of different approaches to try to formalise organic
structures in human organisations, and the numbers I think speak for
themselves (I certainly have very little faith in formalising
something that springs from human chaos, even though there's a lot of
money and fame in it if solved) You can read up on Complex Systems
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_system) to get a feel for what
the basic theory is about (with or without humans directly involved),
and then move on to Complexity theory and organizations
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application_of_complexity_theory_to_organizations)
for more readings on the subject. I have no idea if Appreciative
Inquiry works well or not, but I've seen and tried so many varieties
of this that I have no faith in any of them working very well, at
least not under the banner of a system that works well for the whole
organisation. I'll stop now before I *will* pull out my soap-box and
rant ... :)

regards,

Alex
--
"Ultimately, all things are known because you want to believe you know."
                                                         - Frank Herbert
__ http://shelter.nu/ __________________________________________________

David Pattern | 4 Aug 08:19 2006
Picon

Re: graphical book browsing on the OPAC

Hi Kevin

Here's a prototype put together by Iman Moradi at Huddersfield:

http://library.organised.info/images/prototype.htm
<http://library.organised.info/images/prototype.htm> 

Talis blogged a little bit about it earlier on in the year:

http://blogs.talis.com/panlibus/archives/2006/02/images_of_hudde.php
<http://blogs.talis.com/panlibus/archives/2006/02/images_of_hudde.php> 

regards
Dave Pattern
Univeristy of Huddersfield

________________________________

From: Next generation catalogs for libraries on behalf of Kevin Kierans
Sent: Thu 03/08/2006 21:13
To: NGC4LIB <at> listserv.nd.edu
Subject: [NGC4LIB] graphical book browsing on the OPAC

Hello all.
Has anyone done or seen a visual way to browse thumbnail covers in a opac
in shelf order, that somehow simulates (or betters) the physical experience of "browsing
the shelves?"

What you can "get" from physical browsing:
  Size of the book (thickness[number of pages] , height)
  Wear and tear on the book: It's new!  It's beat up so probably old.
  The call number in mostly the same place on the spine of the book.
  The format: (trade paper, hardcover etc.)
  The title and author (if you read sideways, and the spine label doesn't cover it)
  Some notion of what the cover might look like (colour, typeface, design)

Then of course you can pull the book out and see the cover and back and the TOC and.

I suppose you could just line up the thumbnails along with some data below or above...
But I was thinking of something "cooler,"  a jukebox type display, or...?

 
Kevin

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