Matthew Takeda | 1 Aug 01:07 2006
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Re: Re: Usefull stove / pot advise

Hamilton Moore wrote:
>The alcohol stove works well though I've not mastered the simmer problem ...

I've had no problems simmering with Mark's penny stove.

>...  I usually bring my food to a boil then simmer for 20-40 minutes (for raw
>beans and rice).

I think I've mentioned this before. I sometimes carry a pressure 
cooker. The one I use for backpacking has a 1.5 liter capacity and 
weighs 900 grams, so  you have to look at that extra weight in 
comparison to fuel and time saved, among other factors. It can be 
advantageous, especially at altitude, where the boiling point is 
depressed. It cooks presoaked beans or rice in about 10 minutes at 
pressure (that's 10 minutes of simmer heat after bringing the pot up 
to a boil).

Matthew Takeda
the JOAT 

 
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Scott Macri | 1 Aug 03:13 2006
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Re: Re: PLB's

Not sure, but rangers have recommended they be carried when going solo.
-- 
Scott A. Macri
Trail Name: Mowgli
www.HikeHaven.com
http://360.yahoo.com/hacktorious

On 7/31/06, goodhumorman85 <goodhumorman85@...> wrote:
>
>   It is my understanding that, while the technology is there, many or
> perhaps most search and rescue teams don't have the ability to sweep
> for a PLB. So why bother (unless you know they have it where you are)?
>
> -Odin
>
> --- In BackpackingLight@...<BackpackingLight%40yahoogroups.com>,
> "Scott Macri"
>
> <hacktorious <at> ...> wrote:
> >
> > They are really the same thing. I recently just bought the ACR
> instead of
> > the McMurdo. 1 oz wasn't worth the extra money. The Mc looks cool
> though.
> >
> > --
> > Scott A. Macri
>
>  
>
(Continue reading)

Matthew | 1 Aug 21:07 2006
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Re: solo

JDM,
I've dealt with similar bug and temp conflict issues and one thing I 
have used with success is an in expensive non woven nylon liner. 
Instead of putting the liner in the bag I simply put the bag inside 
the liner. It has plenty of girth to accomidate most bags. Then if 
the temps are to warm but the mosquitoes are out in force I simply 
climb out of the bag but remain inside the liner. It breaths fairly 
well and even acts as a nice splashguard for your bag(watch it 
though as the seams will leak if sitting in H2O). Sort of a poor 
mans bivy. It has a hood liner as well and can be drawn up around 
the face in conjunction with a head net to keep the skeeters at 
bay.You could still take the 1#13 bag and then carry the 5oz liner 
and come out ahead. Silk Designs makes one that Campmor sells for 
$7.99. here's the 
link:http://www.campmor.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?
productId=7733&memberId=12500226&storeId=226&catalogId=40000000226&la
ngId=-1  .
Thanks,
Matt

 --- In BackpackingLight@..., "James D. Marco" 
<jdm27 <at> ...> wrote:
>
> Jim,
>         A lot of the concerns with solo travel do not bother me. I 
chose
> to do this and society can go to the devil. Even if I end up 
killing
> myself, or getting damaged by a black bear, at least I can say 
there 
(Continue reading)

Jerry Goller | 1 Aug 21:25 2006

RE: Re: What light water treatment method do you use?

I've used various AquaStars for a couple of years now. We did the
pre-production testing on them.

It is reasonably light, at about 8 ounces, and is very easy to use. It now
comes with a small mesh pre-filter that fits over the mouth of the bottle to
remove the "floaties" from the water. I found it very convenient to purify a
liter at breaks. I'd just always break at a stream or lake. In the mountains
I normally just carry a liter of water anyway.

As long as you understand that it will kill pretty much anything in the
water but won't filter out anything (junk in the water) it's a great system.
I love it in the mountains where the water is clear but may be contaminated
by sheep or cattle.  

The AquaStar was designed to be used by hikers and backpackers. It is rugged
and filters a liter at a time. The Steripen was designed for travelers
wanting to purify a glass of water at a time. It isn't nearly as rugged at
the Steripen. I've not used one personally so can't really tell you much
about them that you don't already know.

http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
reviews and tests on the planet.

-----Original Message-----
From: BackpackingLight@...
[mailto:BackpackingLight@...] On Behalf Of a11enq
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2006 3:56 PM
To: BackpackingLight@...
Subject: [BackpackingLight] Re: What light water treatment method do you
use?
(Continue reading)

Jerry Goller | 1 Aug 21:27 2006

RE: Re: What light water treatment method do you use?

They quit making those a few years ago. Seychelle is one of the few makers
of inline filters left, as far as I know. I keep hearing rumors that
CamelBak makes one for the military but they've never let me have one.

Jerry 

http://www.BackpackGearTest.org : the most comprehensive interactive gear
reviews and tests on the planet.

-----Original Message-----
From: BackpackingLight@...
[mailto:BackpackingLight@...] On Behalf Of Bruce Lewis
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2006 4:41 PM
To: BackpackingLight@...
Subject: Re: [BackpackingLight] Re: What light water treatment method do you
use?

The Safewater in-line filter weights about 4 ounces and be added to any
hydration bag.
Problem is, getting the water into your pot at the end of the day for
cooking takes forever, if you don¹t want to boil the water.

Bruce Lewis
Http:/lightbackpacking.com

On 7/26/06 7:17 AM, "Catherine Proulx" <cproulx@...> wrote:

>  
>  
>  
(Continue reading)

Jim | 1 Aug 21:39 2006
Picon
Picon

Re: What light water treatment method do you use?

Four hours at the max, to kill crypto in very cold, dirty water. 
Under the same conditions, viruses in 15 minutes, giardia and other
nasties in a half hour.  With more benign sources (water warmer and/or
with less biological particulates) a half hour or so to kill crypto.

--- In BackpackingLight@..., "Tony C" <tcoutdoors <at> ...> wrote:
>
> How long does Aqua Mira take to completely work?  I know some of those 
> water treatments take hours before they kill all the little critters in 
> the water and then you are toting around lots of extra water that isn't 
> yet drinkable as Gian-Paulo pointed out above.
> 
> I was pretty sure that I was going to get tablets or the Aqua Mira, but 
> Gian-Paulo has got me confused (not his fault)...guess I need to do 
> more research and do some real-world testing.
> 

 
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Scott Macri | 1 Aug 21:51 2006
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Re: Re: What light water treatment method do you use?

Destroys viruses and bacteria in 15 minutes, Giardia in 30-minutes and
Cryptosporidia in 4-hours.  Usually I will wait 30 minutes and drink it
through my bottle/combo filter.  This ensures the crypto is removed.
-- 
Scott A. Macri
Trail Name: Mowgli
www.HikeHaven.com
http://360.yahoo.com/hacktorious

On 7/26/06, Tony C <tcoutdoors@...> wrote:
>
>   How long does Aqua Mira take to completely work? I know some of those
> water treatments take hours before they kill all the little critters in
> the water and then you are toting around lots of extra water that isn't
> yet drinkable as Gian-Paulo pointed out above.
>
> I was pretty sure that I was going to get tablets or the Aqua Mira, but
> Gian-Paulo has got me confused (not his fault)...guess I need to do
> more research and do some real-world testing.
>
> --- In Ba <BackpackingLight%40yahoogroups.com>
>

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

 
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James D. Marco | 1 Aug 20:50 2006
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Re: Re: What light water treatment method do you use?

I would recommend against it. H202 breaks down rapidly based on light,
pressure and temperature. Hence, the age of the solution has a lot to do with it. 
Backpacking has too many extremes to count on: 90 degrees F in a 
valley to 28 degrees on the top of a mountain, for example. All within a 
days hike.  The nature of peroxide causes it to decompose at different
rates, soo, a single hot day with the sun beating down on your pack, might
render it useless unless you use a glass bottle to increase the 
pressure.
        I guess that it would work since the extra O  would be
an effective oxidizing agent. It was recommended to me for mouthwash 
and gargle when a molar was acting up, so I doubt that it is very 
poisonous. Again, as with most water treatment chemicals, it will work well
for some things, less well for others. I suspect that cysts, tapeworm eggs,
and other larger things will not be killed by the weak solution of peroxide.
They are "designed" to withstand harsher conditions than a peroxide bath.  
        Did he say why he was using the charcoal (besides taste)?  I never
thought of peroxide as having any flavour.
        My thoughts only . . .
                jdm

At 09:30 AM 7/31/2006, you wrote:
>I just saw a tv show here in oz where they do a bit of half ass
>medical myth busting, and this time they had a 'survival expert'
>telling people to put 6% hydrogen peroxide into stream water to treat
>it (a few drops), and then filter it thru charcoal. has anyone used
>H2O2 before?? and what sort of concentrations?? My work has a supply
>of analysis grade H2O2... :-)
>
>
>
(Continue reading)

Russell Nelson | 1 Aug 20:56 2006
Picon

Re: Reflective Insulation

I'm no expert, but you just might be sewing yourself a sauna since the
emergency blankets don't breathe all that well.

Russ

On 7/31/06, Josh E. <jandk1800@...> wrote:
>
>   I am thinking about making a summer quilt with a emergency blanket
> sandwiched between two layers of 1.1 oz ripstop nylon. I figured that
> since the blankets could be used in an emergency they should be able
> to be used any time. The use of nylone to cover the blanket would be
> to add comfort and to add durability to the emergency blanket. I was
> wondering if anyone has ever tried it or if anyone knows what the
> rating would be on an emergency blanket. I sleep in my clothing to
> add to the warmth and think that would add to the emergency blanket.
> If it works I was even thinking that the emergency blanket could be
> used with a lighter quilt to reduce the need for a thick quilt for
> colder climates. Please let me know if you have any suggestions or
> experience in this area if not I should be making one soon to test
> this idea.
> Thanks,
> Josh
>
>  
>

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

 
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James D. Marco | 1 Aug 22:07 2006
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Re: Re: solo

Matt,
        Thanks! This looks like a good solution.  But, CampMor would not
take my plastic nor my login...something with their system, I think. I
will try again later.  In the mean time, this really looks like a better
solution than the tent (2#10.) The tarp weighs in at 1#4 and 6oz more
for the bag liner. 3 more for the netting. Soo, I will be saving about
13oz. Good Duty!
        This last weekend was not too bad.  I brought the tent, since
the weatherman had predicted torrential down pours, lightening, thunder
and some flooding.  I got SOAKED on the way in (rained from early morn. 
~0400, till around 1300 or so.)  Then, it quit. I had a very nice Saturday in the 
woods...cleaning up trail garbage from the "adventure racers" that were 
there. What trashy people...litter, lost GatorAid bottles, lost Nalgene bottles,
power bar wrappers, piece of a platy hose...etc.
        Thanks again, I will get it and try it...looks good!
                My thoughts only . . .
                        jdm     
At 03:07 PM 8/1/2006, you wrote:
>JDM,
>I've dealt with similar bug and temp conflict issues and one thing I 
>have used with success is an in expensive non woven nylon liner. 
>Instead of putting the liner in the bag I simply put the bag inside 
>the liner. It has plenty of girth to accomidate most bags. Then if 
>the temps are to warm but the mosquitoes are out in force I simply 
>climb out of the bag but remain inside the liner. It breaths fairly 
>well and even acts as a nice splashguard for your bag(watch it 
>though as the seams will leak if sitting in H2O). Sort of a poor 
>mans bivy. It has a hood liner as well and can be drawn up around 
>the face in conjunction with a head net to keep the skeeters at 
>bay.You could still take the 1#13 bag and then carry the 5oz liner 
(Continue reading)


Gmane