Daniel Kelly | 1 Jan 01:13 2009

Ski/Board Time! Hammocks For Summer!


WooHoo! SnowSlammedAgain! More coming-Ski/Board With Us!Ski/Board/X
Package For Up To 6!

Package incl Lodging (6 Nights) and Transportation to 5 of the
Following:

Santa Fe Ski Basin-Taos-Pajarito-Sipapu-Red River-Angelfire-Enchanted
Forest-

San Pedro Parks-Valles Caldera (reservations required)

All For Only

$650. for 2 People
$1000. for 4 People
$1250. for 6 People

Gasoline Extra/..also $150 ea=per person over 6/ ..also Airport
Transportation $150. /Not Incl Equipment or Lift Tickets

http://www.newmexicooutdoor.com/Skiing_Boarding.php
<http://www.newmexicooutdoor.com/Skiing_Boarding.php>

Wanna Drive Your Group? Just Rent Our Guest Home=$750 week

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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Cara Lin Bridgman | 2 Jan 15:37 2009
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Re: Is anyone using motor assisted bikes for hammock camping?

You need to check out the yahoo group RootsRadicals.  It's about 
long-tail bikes and quite a few (including mine) have electric motors. 
Quite a few owners take their bikes (with or without motors) for offroad 
camping and on long cross-country trips (around New Zealand's South 
Island, across Canada, etc).  Some of these even use hammocks...

CL

ktjensen wrote:
> Just wondering if anyone is using a motor assisted bicycle to go 
> offroad camping with.  Look at this www.bikeengines.com to see what I 
> mean.  Was thinking that this would be a nice way to get away for it 
> all, and have some good MPG, and a hammock.

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Blake Robert | 2 Jan 18:20 2009
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alcohol stove for hammock backpacker?


As I reach the age at which every ounce is felt in backpacking---I have begun to reduce the weight of my load by
going to lighter gear. The first step was in going to hammock camping. Now, I am considering leaving behind
my faithful Optimus 99 (sob!!!) and using either a fuel tablet buring Esbit stove or making an alcohol stove.
 
The one I am considering is found on several sites with the title Cool little miniature stove-----if you
google that title you will see what I am planning to make and hope to carry backpacking. I just have to figure
where one can still find wire coat hangers and get a quarter handful of fiberglass insulation.

But, my real concern is that I found several sites that say that alcohol stoves made of soft drink cans do not
last because the aluminum can not take the heat too many times---long trail hikers interviewed say they
are lucky if such a stove lasts 500 miles.

Now that sounds like quite a bit of use---but, no matter how long a stove lasts---I don't want one that lets me
down partway through a hike.

Has anyone in this forum had experience with this?

How does such a stove deteriorate? Does it warn you before its use is over or does it go straight from useful to gone?

  R Blake, Flagstaff, AZ

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Ralph Oborn | 2 Jan 19:46 2009
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Re: alcohol stove for hammock backpacker?

On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 10:20 AM, Blake Robert <xflagstaff9@...> wrote:

>
> As I reach the age at which every ounce is felt in backpacking---I have
> begun to reduce the weight of my load by going to lighter gear. The first
> step was in going to hammock camping. Now, I am considering leaving behind
> my faithful Optimus 99 (sob!!!) and using either a fuel tablet buring Esbit
> stove or making an alcohol stove.
>
> The one I am considering is found on several sites with the title Cool
> little miniature stove-----if you google that title you will see what I am
> planning to make and hope to carry backpacking. I just have to figure where
> one can still find wire coat hangers and get a quarter handful of fiberglass
> insulation.
>
> But, my real concern is that I found several sites that say that alcohol
> stoves made of soft drink cans do not last because the aluminum can not take
> the heat too many times---long trail hikers interviewed say they are lucky
> if such a stove lasts 500 miles.
>
> Now that sounds like quite a bit of use---but, no matter how long a stove
> lasts---I don't want one that lets me down partway through a hike.
>
> Has anyone in this forum had experience with this?
>
> How does such a stove deteriorate? Does it warn you before its use is over
> or does it go straight from useful to gone?
>
>  R Blake, Flagstaff, AZ

(Continue reading)

Rick | 2 Jan 19:52 2009

Re: alcohol stove for hammock backpacker?

The beauty of a pop can stove is that it does not matter if it lasts. 
If it burns through in a month, it can be replaced by a new one that the 
hiker builds in the field.

By the way, this topic is maybe better at the Backpacking Stoves group.

Rick

Ralph Oborn wrote:
> On Fri, Jan 2, 2009 at 10:20 AM, Blake Robert <xflagstaff9@...> wrote:
> 
>> As I reach the age at which every ounce is felt in backpacking---I have
>> begun to reduce the weight of my load by going to lighter gear. The first
>> step was in going to hammock camping. Now, I am considering leaving behind
>> my faithful Optimus 99 (sob!!!) and using either a fuel tablet buring Esbit
>> stove or making an alcohol stove.
>>
>> The one I am considering is found on several sites with the title Cool
>> little miniature stove-----if you google that title you will see what I am
>> planning to make and hope to carry backpacking. I just have to figure where
>> one can still find wire coat hangers and get a quarter handful of fiberglass
>> insulation.
>>
>> But, my real concern is that I found several sites that say that alcohol
>> stoves made of soft drink cans do not last because the aluminum can not take
>> the heat too many times---long trail hikers interviewed say they are lucky
>> if such a stove lasts 500 miles.
>>
>> Now that sounds like quite a bit of use---but, no matter how long a stove
>> lasts---I don't want one that lets me down partway through a hike.
(Continue reading)

ginohav | 2 Jan 19:58 2009
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Keeping warm in winter

My son spent a couple of days in Maine camping out in 10 degree 
weather. I asked him how he keep warm and he told me he used an 
emergeny car powerstart battery assy. and plugged in his small heater 
set on 500 watts and it lasted two 8 hr nights. Here's another thought, 
use a winter tarp with a Zodi propane heater. Lugging around Powerstart 
car batteries and Zodi heaters only adds a couple of more pounds 
conpared with lugging around underquits and more padding. Each style of 
camping will have different sets of parameters. The style of camping 
using heaters and winter tents will only appeal to campers who pull 
small sleds while snowshoeing in on flat terrain and could care less 
about adding an extra couple of pounds. I think using special designed 
winter hammocks is the way to go for winter hammocking rather then 
modifing a 3 season hammock for winter conditions. Just my thoughts and 
nothing is set in stone.

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Bill Fornshell | 2 Jan 21:07 2009
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Re: Keeping warm in winter

Hi,

Check out one of these wood stoves from Titanium Goat.  Look at the lightest version.  Just over 1 pound.
http://www.titaniumgoat.com/cstove.html

If you had something like a tent around and over your hammock one of these might work.

If it was setup right you might be able to feed the stove without getting out of your hammock.

Bill in Texas

--- On Fri, 1/2/09, ginohav <ginohav@...> wrote:
From: ginohav <ginohav@...>
Subject: [Hammock Camping] Keeping warm in winter
To: hammockcamping@...
Date: Friday, January 2, 2009, 12:58 PM

    
            My son spent a couple of days in Maine camping out in 10 degree 

weather. I asked him how he keep warm and he told me he used an 

emergeny car powerstart battery assy. and plugged in his small heater 

set on 500 watts and it lasted two 8 hr nights. Here's another thought, 

use a winter tarp with a Zodi propane heater. Lugging around Powerstart 

car batteries and Zodi heaters only adds a couple of more pounds 

(Continue reading)

Ed Speer | 2 Jan 21:18 2009

RE: Keeping warm in winter

Great idea!  There are many ways to skin a cat & there are many ways to stay
warm when winter camping.  Of course, I make SegmentedPadExtenders, and down
PeaPods & UnderQuilts for hammock warmth, but I'm always looking for other
or better methods.  Someday, technology will solve this problem for us.

I'd love to have more time to experiment with alternative stay-warm systems
for hammocks.  AC or DC heaters, open or enclosed flames, chemical body
warmers, & probably many others I've not thought of yet could each have
legitimate uses.  I know of folks who've plugged in an AC electric blanket
with great success.  For backcountry use, small motorcycle batteries & DC
electric lap blankets for use in cars seems like a logical approach yet to
be tried.  Motorcycle riders & snowmobilers wear DC heated jackets &
coveralls for winter warmth-wouldn't it be neat if we could adapt this for
hammock use.  Even if the heat lasted only one night, it could still be
appropriate for many campouts.

At this week's New Year's Eve campout atop Springer Mtn, GA, I used a 12-hr
HotHands Body Warmer & was quite impressed!  (Wal-Mart, <$2 for 3 pack; 1.3
oz each).   The heat lasted a full 10 hrs-they also come in 16 & 18 hr
versions.  There are versions for hands & feet as well.  I'll gladly carry
some on my winter campouts from now on.  It's probably been 10 years or more
since I'd tried these-they're vastly improved now..Ed

Moderator, Hammock Camping List

Author, Hammock Camping book

Editor, Hammock Camping Newsletters

Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc
(Continue reading)

Ed Speer | 2 Jan 21:23 2009

RE: Keeping warm in winter

The Titanium Goat stove does look good Bill.  Do you know of anyone who's
tried one?  How long does it burn before needing more fuel?  Could you use
charcoal instead of wood?   .Ed

Moderator, Hammock Camping List

Author, Hammock Camping book

Editor, Hammock Camping Newsletters

Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc

From: hammockcamping@... [mailto:hammockcamping@...]
On Behalf Of Bill Fornshell
Sent: Friday, January 02, 2009 3:08 PM
To: hammockcamping@...
Subject: Re: [Hammock Camping] Keeping warm in winter

Hi,

Check out one of these wood stoves from Titanium Goat.  Look at the lightest
version.  Just over 1 pound.
http://www.titaniumgoat.com/cstove.html

If you had something like a tent around and over your hammock one of these
might work.

If it was setup right you might be able to feed the stove without getting
out of your hammock.

(Continue reading)

Ed Speer | 2 Jan 21:28 2009

RE: Keeping warm in winter

Youngblood, do you have any thoughts on safety or condensation problems with
this stove & the WinterTarp?   ..Ed

Moderator, Hammock Camping List

Author, Hammock Camping book

Editor, Hammock Camping Newsletters

Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc

From: hammockcamping@... [mailto:hammockcamping@...]
On Behalf Of Ed Speer
Sent: Friday, January 02, 2009 3:23 PM
To: hammockcamping@...
Subject: RE: [Hammock Camping] Keeping warm in winter

The Titanium Goat stove does look good Bill. Do you know of anyone who's
tried one? How long does it burn before needing more fuel? Could you use
charcoal instead of wood? .Ed

Moderator, Hammock Camping List

Author, Hammock Camping book

Editor, Hammock Camping Newsletters

Owner, Speer Hammocks Inc

From: hammockcamping@...
(Continue reading)


Gmane