Skot Nelson | 1 Oct 04:46 2005

Re: [Sigia-l] OT: Library Thing


On Sep-30-2005, at 4:16 AM, Jonathan Baker-bates wrote:

> The sheer volume of raw footage to
> sift through must have been huge. I was told by somebody who claims to
> know about these things that their search was narrowed  
> significantly by
> automated video tagging.
>

substantially mitigated by time and location of attack information.

an interesting contrast is how utterly useless automated data  
analysis techniques were in the case of the 9/11 attacks.

> But this isn't to say that there must have been some very bored  
> Bobbies
> looking at video playbacks for quite a while.
>

but imagine the career boost for the guy who found them.
--
Skot Nelson
skot <at> penguinstorm.com

Documentation? Proposals? Writing? Editing?
We do that.

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Andrew Boyd | 1 Oct 06:12 2005

Automated Data Analysis (was Re: [Sigia-l] OT: Library Thing)

Skot Nelson wrote:

>
> substantially mitigated by time and location of attack information.
>
> an interesting contrast is how utterly useless automated data  
> analysis techniques were in the case of the 9/11 attacks.
>
Hi Skot,

two things:
- automated data analysis has come a very long way since 2001, and
- it is accepted that the failure then was a human coordination issue, 
not an automated analysis issue.

Trans-national targets, like international terrorists, were very hard to 
keep track of back then by conventional means. Read Tom Clancy, he will 
tell you all about it :)

Best regards, Andrew

--

-- 
-----------------------------------------
Andrew Boyd  andrew <at> friendlymanual.com
Web Development/ePublishing Solutions
http://www.friendlymanual.com
http://www.successadvances.com
-----------------------------------------

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Karl Fast | 1 Oct 18:22 2005
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Re: [Sigia-l] Definitions of terms related to metadata


For the record, Fred Leise deserves the kudos for this document. I
am listed as first author only because of how MoveableType handles
multiple authors, not because I did any heavy lifting. Fred did the
vast majority of the work; Mike and I did secondary work.

>  You may also want to look at a definition of terms that Karl Fast
>  et al wrote on Boxes and Arrows. 

> http://www.boxesandarrows.com/archives/controlled_vocabularies_a_glosso-thesaurus.php

--

-- 
Karl Fast
http://www.livingskies.com/

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Gabby Hon | 3 Oct 17:40 2005
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[Sigia-l] Driving customer to offline from online task

I am looking for examples of online experiences that drive customers
to offline contact methods in order to complete a task--be it
purchase, information retrieval, etc.  I am faced with a project in
which customers will most likely fill out some information online and
then be driven to offline contact (probably a phone call) in order to
complete their experience.

Please note that I have very little control over this situation and am
looking only for examples.

Thanks!
Gabby

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Alexander Johannesen | 4 Oct 00:26 2005
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Re: Face Recognition Systems (formerly [Sigia-l] OT: Library Thing)

On 9/30/05, Drop, Daniel              SIK <ddrop <at> sikorsky.com> wrote:
> In Alexander's Johannesen's comment about face recognition software and
> video-motion detection software, he gave many examples of metadata that the
> software could automatically produce.  He also stated, "These things aren't
> fantasy, only a bit hidden from the normal person."  If there is someone who
> could unhide this ability in a forum like the IA Summit, there could be much
> interest.  The Summit is always encouraging submissions from outside the
> field.

Sorry for the late reply, but I've been taking some time off. Yay.

As to your enquiry, it never actually occurred to me that my old past
in the high-tech security industry would have much relevance to
everything HCI, but it certainly is interesting in what can be
automagically extracted from live and still images.

As for myself, I left that industry over 8 years ago. Maybe I should
dig up some old contacts and tell them about emerging markets? :)

Alex
--
"Ultimately, all things are known because you want to believe you know."
                                                         - Frank Herbert
__ http://shelter.nu/ __________________________________________________

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Fred Beecher | 4 Oct 00:59 2005
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Re: [Sigia-l] Driving customer to offline from online task

Gabby,

For this project are customers going to be driven to make the phone
call themselves or will they be called by e.g., a sales rep? If
they're going to be driven to make a call themselves, do all you can
to educate your client about the high potential for negative effects
that experience can have.

>From what you've said, the goal of this project is to gather sales
leads. So, assuming that goal, here are some observations I have made
in my experience working on these types of sites.

1. On an insurance quote site, the system would direct users to a
different site with a different URL and completely different look and
feel. This created a huge abandonment rate. Something like 2% of the
people who clicked on the link to be taken to this new site actually
filled out the form. When we changed the system so that the quoting
took place all on one site with a consistent user experience, the
completion rate jumped to 69%. So if an inconsistent UXP between two
elements of the same medium caused such a horrendous drop-off, imagine
what would happen if you made your users switch media!

Note: This insurance company was very "touchy feely." They wanted
person-to-person customer contact and have a huge call center to make
this happen. While your project may not require a massive call center
to fulfill on all the leads, some changes may need to happen with the
business to be able to support this kind of business model.

Also note the importance of metrics here. Is your client currently
keeping track of their traffic? If so, you can probably get some data
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Listera | 4 Oct 04:51 2005

Re: [Sigia-l] what are best practices (was OT: Library Thing)

Karl Fast:

> Best practices are guidelines. Heuristics. Rules of thumb.

Best practices are emphatically NOT guidelines, heuristics, rules of thumb,
etc. Otherwise, they would be called one of those. There are no practices
better than all other possible ones. They are not even called *good*
practices. Certain "practices" are called "best" because some people want to
*you* to adopt them. There's almost always an overt or covert reason why
they do, and it's rarely altruistic. Best practices are the enemy of
innovation and excellence. They discount deviations from orthodoxy. They
dull growing minds, especially in young designers. Two examples just from
today's reading material:

Case # 1/Medicine

Best Practice:

The findings by the Australians in the early 1980's went so against medical
thinking, which held that psychological stress caused stomach and duodenal
ulcers, that it took many more years for an entrenched medical profession to
accept it.

Light bulb:

Two Australian scientists who upset medical dogma by discovering a bacterium
that causes stomach inflammation, ulcers and cancer won the 2005 Nobel Prize
for Physiology or Medicine yesterday.

<http://tinyurl.com/9olh7>
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Eric Scheid | 4 Oct 05:51 2005
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Re: [Sigia-l] Driving customer to offline from online task

On 4/10/05 1:40 AM, "Gabby Hon" <gabbyhon <at> gmail.com> wrote:

> I am looking for examples of online experiences that drive customers
> to offline contact methods in order to complete a task--be it
> purchase, information retrieval, etc.  I am faced with a project in
> which customers will most likely fill out some information online and
> then be driven to offline contact (probably a phone call) in order to
> complete their experience.

I was recently contacted by WeCallYouNow.com. Disclosure: I've declined
their offer.

The We Call You Now button initiates a two-way conversation via the normal
phone lines. The web site visitor or email button pusher is directed to a
web page where they input their landline phone number. The system rings the
business to tell them a call is coming from the web site and then calls the
visitor. The phone connection is established to provide additional services
and complete sales transactions. 
  
During the sales pitch they claimed an increase in conversion rates in
shopping carts and on booking pages from 11% to 66%. I suspect part of that
is simply due to the reassurance factor of knowing they could contact
someone if needed (ie. conversion increased without actually making a call).

I also believe the user experience is subtly different from displaying the
phone number and hoping the user dials the number themselves. One invites
immediate action, the other passively invites the visitor to jump through a
hoop first.

e.
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Skot Nelson | 4 Oct 06:11 2005

Re: [Sigia-l] Driving customer to offline from online task


On Oct-3-2005, at 8:51 PM, Eric Scheid wrote:

> The We Call You Now button initiates a two-way conversation via the  
> normal
> phone lines.
>
> I also believe the user experience is subtly different from  
> displaying the
> phone number and hoping the user dials the number themselves. One  
> invites
> immediate action, the other passively invites the visitor to jump  
> through a
> hoop first.

I implemented a system functionally similar to this a few years ago  
in the investment industry. Those who used it were very happy; there  
was a very large proportion of users who felt one or some combination  
of the following:
a) they'd rather just send an email (we had a very good record of  
responding to every email message withn 48 hours)
b) they'd rather just dial the number, and didn't notice the button  
(or suspected it wouldn't really work, or the call would take too  
long to come.)

many similar systems also have the ability to initiate an online chat  
conversation. i've personally used these a couple of times, and have  
been reasonably happy - live chat with a customer support agent is an  
excellent trigger for an offline action, assuming the live chat isn't  
redundant (i.e. the person then has to call the agent they were just  
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Eric Scheid | 4 Oct 08:12 2005
Picon

Re: [Sigia-l] what are best practices (was OT: Library Thing)

On 4/10/05 12:51 PM, "Listera" <listera <at> rcn.com> wrote:

> <http://www.useit.com/alertbox/designmistakes.html>

Ah yes, Jakob. He's the one that encourages everyone to think for
themselves, to ignore the espoused dogma of gurus, and studiously avoids
producing slabs of "best practice" guidelines.

/snark.

meanwhile ... 

On 4/10/05 12:51 PM, "Listera" <listera <at> rcn.com> wrote:

> Best practices are emphatically NOT guidelines, heuristics, rules of thumb,
> etc. Otherwise, they would be called one of those.

and yet ... look who is calling one of Jakob's guidelines a best practice
(and in an effort to bolster his argument that best practices are not
guidelines!)

> Best Practice:
> 
>> I admit it: during my spring 2004 seminars, I downgraded cross-platform
>> compatibility to a one-star guideline [...]
>> <http://www.useit.com/alertbox/designmistakes.html>

e.

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Gmane