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FLRig and rigctld NET



A search of the Goog turned up only an old post to this forum that went unanswered.  Hopefully, I'll have better luck than Jose.

I have set myself down and worked out how to get rigctld to run and allow multiple programs to connect to one rig via the USB to Serial device.  Unfortunately, FLRig's UI does not seem to be coded the same as FLDigi.

With FLDigi, the transceiver control can be setup under Hamlib by setting the Rig device to Hamlib NET rigctl, and given an ip address as the device, it will connect to the rigctld service and happily do its thing.

FLRig on the other hand, does not have an option for Hamlib NET rigctl, nor will it allow for the direct entry of a device address.  In fact, FLRig will not allow the user to connect to any devic e NOT listed in the drop down box.  This means that if a user creates a /dev/radio device which is pointed at a /dev/ttyUSB#, that /dev/radio device cannot be used.  Instead, only the direct reference to /dev/ttyUSB# may be used and only if it is present in the drop down.

Would it be possible to align the UI of FLRig's configuration with that of FLDigi, such that FLRig may be used with a rigctld service?  Is it possible currently to run FLRig, perhaps with a CLI command, to connect to Hamlib NET rigctl rather than to a specific radio and serial device?

This would allow me to finally be able to run FLRig as my main radio interface, with FLDigi doing its digital work and CQRLog logging the contacts.

Please do not reply with any mention of XMLRPC as t hat only allows FLRig and FLDigi to run simultaneously, but does not allow any other program to access the USB/Serial device without conflicts.

All the best and Seven-Three,

Michael - K5WRN




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Posted by: michael.k5wrn-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org



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Freq Analysis mode on FLDIGI



A big thanks for adding this. I recently Ebay'd a cheap Chinese TXCO for my Kenwood TS-590. Using the freq analysis mode with WWV I was able to determine that it was working to spec (c5Hz drift over 2 hours) and also was fairly accurately calibrated out of the box, starting a couple of Hz low and eventually settling a couple of Hz high.


Trying to do this sort of measurement without FLDIGI's freq analysis mode would have been quite difficult and the csv file means it is really simple to produce a graph to show the TXCO's characteristics.


Brian G0UKB



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Posted by: g0ukb-aeB/dSAnsf7pIgCt6eIbzw@public.gmane.org



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Audio recording - Repeater jamming

Hi all,
we have a bad problem with jammers on the local repeater.
I would really like to have a recording with timestamp of every..
"event", for prosecution and legal reasons.
This should be a completely automated system, with my Kenwood V71
connected to my laptop, or ideally to one of the raspberry pi that are
my shack IT complement.

Do you have any hint on this? I am setting up a stopgap recorder with
the infos provided here.
However this solution leaves me no hint of the time, something also
important for discovering patterns in the jamming activity..

73 de IZ2QYZ

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Posted by: Tommaso Ravaglioli <tomrava@...>
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WSPR v4.0 - Linux Package Maintainer Input Request



Hello All,

I'm currently working with a couple package maintainers to help bring WSPR to more *Nix distro's and thought this would be a good time to solicit input / start a dialog with a larger audience.

At present, WSPR builds on Debian & Ubuntu servers ( via Launchpad ), i386 and amd64. There is limited support for armv6 ( things like Raspberry Pi etc ), but several have WSPR0 ( C version CLI only WSPR ) and Wspr_No_Gui.py ( Python3 CLI version ) running on their systems. Currently, WSPR_No_Gui.py is not part of current release packages due to core functionality issues. Progress on resolving the issues is being made, so hopefully, we can include it in future releases.

This is *not* a feature or core code change request, rather, a request for suggestions on how we can configure things to better integrate with the various *Nix distros. Core code changes,. feature requests, bugs, etc should be sent to the wsjt-devel mailing list directly < wsjt-devel-5NWGOfrQmneRv+LV9MX5uipxlwaOVQ5f@public.gmane.org >, where Joe can disposition them appropriately.

At present, due to the shift from Python2 to Python3, there is no effort to support regression to older distro versions.

DISTRO INFORMATION
* Distro's That I know are being worked on for a WSPR v4.0 release (there may be more):
- Debian (i386, amd64) Wheezy / Jessy (POC, KI7MT + Debian Ham Maintainers )
- Ubuntu (i386, amd64) Trusty / Utopic (POC, KI7MT + Ubuntu/Debian Ham Maintainers )
- Fedora (i386, amd64) ( need specific versions ) ( POC, Richard, KF5IOM )
- Gentoo (i386, amd64) (POC, Tom, DL1JBE)
- Mac (i386, amd64?)  ( 10.8, 10.9 ? ) ( POC, John, G4KLA )

* Distro's where the package needs work or maintainer info is needed:
-FreeBSD
-Slackware
-Rasbian
-Others ?

SOURCE RELATED INFORMATION
- To produce a sanitized tar.gz file, a script is provided within the repository ( wspr-dist.sh ).  Usage is straight forward:

Checkout WSPR from SVN:
svn co https://svn.code.sf.net/p/wsjt/wsjt/branches/wspr
cd ./wspr
./wspr-dist.sh wspr 4.0

Output: ./wspr/dist/wspr-4.0.tar.gz

- Finished man pages are provided  <man1/name.1 + ../source name.1.txt >, which are formated using AsciiDoc. Instructions for building the pages using AsciiDoc (a2x.py) is located within the manpage directory and does *not* require LaTex or Docbook to build them.
- Install and Uninstall targets are provided, but may need adjusting to suite various distro's.

ITEMS of INTEREST / NEEDS
* Maintainer information,
* Distro version applicability
* Distro package requirements
* Autotool modifications suggestions
* Documentation ( packaging related ) needs
* System specific install locations or special needs
* Python3 setup.py build / install suggestions


That's all for now.  You can me me off-list if need be, but for the benefit of others, try to keep general discussion on the wsjt-devel mailing list if possible < wsjt-devel-5NWGOfrQmneRv+LV9MX5uipxlwaOVQ5f@public.gmane.org >.

73's
Greg, KI7MT


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Posted by: ki7mt <ki7mt-/E1597aS9LQAvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org>



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Amateur Radio Country Files

FYI, you can download the latest cty.dat file for fldigi at

http://www.country-files.com/contest/fldigi/

for Linux, Mac OS X, Windows XP, Windows and Vista

Relayed from AD1C by AA5VU

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Posted by: Richard Kriss <aa5vu@...>
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XML-RPC method addition request for Fldigi



 I'd like to request adding these XML-RPC methods to Fldigi:

log.set_rst_in

log.set_rst_out

for use with external control programs.

I use an Xdoe/Applescript app to control FLdigi
and a logger (RUMlog)  on my Macbook and would
like to be able to set RST's from it.

Thanks,  73  .. Jim, W2XO



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Posted by: jimdur-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org



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Ubuntu 14.04 LTE bad files



Has anyone else had an issue with the ICO.  I'm attempting an install on an empty SSD, and the install aborts on a bad file.  The check procedure lists two bad files but doesn't indicate which ones are bad.
 
The ICO came from the Ubuntu web site.


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Posted by: Frank Ney <n4zhg1-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org>



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SignaLinkUSB and Ubuntu 14.04



In Ubuntu releases prior to the advent of 14.04, it was possible to "prescale" the sampling rate of the SLUSB using the .asoundrc file dodge (creating a virtuel sound device) - this no longer works (at least for me) in 14.04!

WSPR is able work with the sample rate supported by the SLUSB, and reportedly so will WSJT 10 be, when it finally makes it to the Ubuntu repositories.

The question is: Has anyone come up with a workaround to enable WSJT 9.x and WSJT-X to work natively on 14.04?
-- Vy 73 de OZ1PIF/5Q2M, Peter ****************************************** ** If it sounds too good to be true -- ** ** it is! ** ** If it sounds about right -- make ** ** sure you can afford to be wrong! ** ** ** ** -- Robert Heinlein: ** ** "Time enough for love" ** ****************************************** email: peter(no-spam filler) <at> frenning.dk http://www.frenning.dk/oz1pif.htm Ph. +45 4619 3239/ +45 2332 9464 Snailmail: Peter Frenning Ternevej 23 DK-4130 Viby Sj. Denmark ******************************************

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Posted by: "Peter Frenning [OZ1PIF]" <peter-pvHko7nTzl9knbxzx/v8hQ@public.gmane.org>



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Re: Re: HSSM-Mesh/Broadband-Hamnet [Was: FLDIGI on mint 17 won't open?]



Yes, you are exactly right.  I have no local interest, so I'm really trying to do it all myself.  I think without years of professional training and experience, it may not be practical to go it alone.


On 9/13/2014 3:42 PM, Jeff Francis™ jeff-CDdbmnNP9qodnm+yROfE0A@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
 
  I haven't been on the forum you're talking about, but I'm going to go out on a limb and hazard a guess as to why you're seeing what you're seeing.

  Networking is a discipline, for lack of a better word.  Ultimately, it's an art/science of moving packets from one place to another that's largely independent of the underlying technology.  From a networking perspective, a TCP packet moving from New York to London doesn't care if it's moving over a transatlantic cable, a satellite, a microwave link, WiFi/HSSM, a packet radio link, or via carrier pigeon.  Networking involves understanding things like TCP, UDP, BGP4, IPv6, Spanning Tree, OSPF, and that kind of thing.

  Clients and servers are a whole separate skillset.  It involves networking, certainly, but also heavily focuses on software and interoperability of software.  It involves understanding the applications as well as the operating systems they run on.  It involves understanding how to bind services to ports, how to configure services to run automatically, how to fail over, how to set up DNS and proxies, and a million other things.

  Finally, there's the HSMM guys.  They're focused on a new way to provided the lowest-level connectivity for the networking piece of this.  A way of connecting network nodes via high-power WiFi.  They're heavily into understanding, configuring, and documenting the lowest level (Layer 1) of the networking stack.

  Given this, it's little surprise that they have little time or interest in helping people with the first two items.  By the time you get to the point where you're doing things like designing HSMM networkings, it's assumed that you've already mastered networking, servers, and software.  It's actually not surprising that they don't respond much to this, as the assumption is that if you're deploying what they're building, you'll already know how to run things on top of it.

  Here's a good analogy.  A rich guy decides he wants to race cars.  So he buys a $1m race car and has it hauled to the track on practice day.  He rolls it down off the trailer and wanders over to the other drivers and mechanics who welcome him, and he asks for a bit of help.  But see, he's never actually driven a car before...

  The rich guy isn't dumb, he's just jumping into the deep end with the wrong crowd on Day 1.  Learn to operate a car.  Then learn to drive in traffic.  Then get some miles under your belt.  Then try racing go-karts to learn how racing works.  Then learn to drive a high-performance car.  Then, maybe, it's time to go race.  But starting out with racing when you've never driven a car before is a recipe for disaster.

  Likewise, setting up a network for events is a solvable problem.  But the HSSM stuff really isn't your problem.  Learn networking first.  Not everything there is to know, but learn about addressing, routing, subnets, broadcast addresses.  The basics.  Then understand the problem you're trying to solve at the event.  Find (or write) software that solves that problem.  Then learn how to set it all up and get it to run reliably on a wired network.  If it won't run right on a wired network, believe me, you're not going to be happy over wireless.  Master getting your software to do what you want and when.  Now that you understand your software and the networking required for the pieces to talk to each other, it's time to look at moving it off the wired network to the HSSM network, and all the new problems associated with flaky connections.  Of course, you don't have to do all of this yourself.  Break it up.  One guy learns networking.  The next guy learns servers.  Third guy learns the software.  And the four guy learns HSSM.  Put them all together, and you've got a solution.

  You'll find hams (and non-hams) happy to help with every piece of this.  But if you don't get the fundamentals down before trying the esoteric stuff, you're going to end up very frustrated.

Jeff N0GQ



On Sat, Sep 13, 2014 at 1:04 PM, Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham] <linuxham-hHKSG33TihhbjbujkaE4pw@public.gmane.org> wrote:
 

Yes, that is the idea.  Live video feed and other high data rate uses would be great.  And, although recreating the internet from scratch would be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer frills and silly stuff.  Just simple access between machines. 

Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving away freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the networking aspect.  This probably means it is harder to do than I'd like.  If you read their forums, there are countless questions from people regarding how to actually USE the stuff.  If you search the internet, you'll find 4+ hour long conferences on how to flash the routers and you still don't learn how to implement a network.  They will even tell you that if you don't know how to make it work, then that is your problem.

Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could download and have the functionality required.  It is probably a money making opportunity.  Of course, if there isn't enough demand, it may not be practical for the time you invest.



On 9/13/2014 2:53 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
 

A non-proprietary/free OS that loads on commonly-available routers
& can auto-connect to others for an instant-network that's self-healing
and robust (e.g. 50mb/s) is a very useful tool.

Have you also considered that you can use the camera feed from a
quad-copter or other vehicle via the Broadband-Hamnet to share it?

The folks on the http://www.broadband-hamnet.org/ Forum used to be
very helpful back when I was experimenting with it - have you not
found that to be the case?

At least some of the Hams there were always excited about new
adopters and delighted to share what they have accomplished -
which includes the apps you listed.

They had a demo set-up at Dayton and I believe many of the other
larger Fests across the USA. I think they were at Stone Mountain
last year -- I believe it's Nov. 1 & 2 this year.

David KD4E

> Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
>
> Yes. I'm using the firmware from the Austin ham group. As an example
> of use, when covering a tree-at halon event, the Austin group is able to
> send live video feed from a remote part of the race back to the starting
> line. They get 50mb/s at line of site distances nearing 10 miles.
> (Using dish antennas) This is in back country with no internet.
>
> I would like to have it for email, file transfers, video, audio
> conferencing, etc., during an emergency when internet and cell service
> is down. It will only work between fellow hams with similar equipment,
> but the idea is to make it a field deploy-able, stand alone network.
> The routers already see each other, and I can log in to either router
> from both computers. So they work, but you can't actually "do" anything.
>
> Here is the problem: I'm a computer novice. I don't know what I need
> to make one machine act as the server, with the other machines clients.
> I need to learn about port forwarding, and advertising the service.
> What I need is someone with network experience who can create a stand
> alone network from scratch. Most people don't understand why I want to
> "re-invent" the internet since it already exists.
>
> Windows 7 is supposed to offer this kind of machine to machine
> networking, but I couldn't get it to work. Now that I'm learning Linux,
> I figure it is a natural for stand alone networking. I just have a lot
> to learn!

--

David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA

Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com

Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/

Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22





--
-=jeff=-



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Posted by: Lloyd <xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org>



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flrig 1.3.16



Is anyone using flrig 1.3.16 successfully with an ICOM
IC-756PROIII or Icom IC-718?

No luck here with either although the indications are different
for the 2.

Thanks and 73,

Mike, K0TER

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Posted by: stansberrymj-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org



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Re: Re: HSSM-Mesh/Broadband-Hamnet



This mesh network is just that, a network.

If you want to add services (web server, voip server, database, email, IM, printers, etc) you have to add those to the network yourself.
You can also provide a link to the Internet.
And this is why people frown upon answering as you introduce advertising into the mix via just about every website you go to .
And of course that breaks the FCC rules.

So, creating the mesh network is easy and the main use for it is to allow computers over an area to be able to communicate to each other easily.

It is the services that you set up that add functionality.
It is not designed as a way to easily get on the Internet there are plenty of commercially available solutions for that.

It is designed with a network engineer (or at least someone with a fairly good amount of networking experience) in mind.
You have to be able to plan out how/where the services enter the mesh and how they are advertised.

I have recently gathered the parts to make a simple mesh myself and will be working on this over the next year or so.
I do have the knowledge to make it work, just not the time right now.

I live outside of Keene, NH up on a hill with a view of downtown Keene from the top of my tower.
I want to create a mesh in the Keene area so local hams can connect and have a high speed network independent of the Internet.

I just need to find a location in Keene I can "see" from my tower to host another node in the mesh to make it useful.

On 09/13/2014 08:35 PM, Lloyd xr250-rphTv4pjVZMJGwgDXS7ZQA@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
 

I have seen those.  The best one is the guy who uses a consumer grade server and hooks it up.  I almost bought one, until I read on the Austin forum that they don't always work, compatibility issues or something.  For those of us who are not computer experts, it really isn't ready for prime time.

Then I wondered about "Apache".  Maybe it can work as a file server?  Maybe I really need a set of servers.  One each for email, file transfer, video streaming?  I really don't even know what I need to ask the right questions!  That's why I put it on the shelf until I can find an interested network guy.  Honestly it might be a bunch of headaches getting it to work.

On 9/13/2014 3:38 PM, 'qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org' qrv-JH0e/pQ7GQk@public.gmane.org [linuxham] wrote:
 

Have you seen these?

https://sites.google.com/site/ecsmesh/
(Youtube that introduces it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8Rw0ZfRN-U )

Others:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GGtwVxZ4Mto

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xpMr1VVUbQQ

Adding a Webserver:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tr5EiK4W994

Adding an analog telephone:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DeSKlyrofbo

HTH ... David KD4E

> Yes, that is the idea. Live video feed and other high data rate uses
> would be great. And, although recreating the internet from scratch
> would be alot of work!!; the good news is we don't need any consumer
> frills and silly stuff. Just simple access between machines.
>
> Unfortunately, I have to say the Austin folks are great at giving away
> freeware to hack the routers, but they refuse to help in the networking
> aspect. This probably means it is harder to do than I'd like. If you
> read their forums, there are countless questions from people regarding
> how to actually USE the stuff. If you search the internet, you'll find
> 4+ hour long conferences on how to flash the routers and you still don't
> learn how to implement a network. They will even tell you that if you
> don't know how to make it work, then that is your problem.
>
> Actually, I bet one of you could build a Linux system that one could
> download and have the functionality required. It is probably a money
> making opportunity. Of course, if there isn't enough demand, it may not
> be practical for the time you invest.

--

David Colburn, KD4E - Nevils, Georgia USA

Safe & Secure Search Engine: duckduckgo.com

Android for Hams: groups.yahoo.com/group/hamdroid
Creative Tech: groups.yahoo.com/group/ham-macguyver
Raspi Alternative: groups.yahoo.com/group/beagleboneblack/

Restored to design-spec at Heaven's gate 1Cor15:22



--
KA1VGM
Larry Levesque


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Posted by: Larry Levesque <ka1vgm-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org>



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Gmane