Alan Gauld | 1 Nov 01:09 2003
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Re: More confusion on conversion


> hexlength = '02X' % length
> TypeError: not all arguments converted

You missed the % sign in the format string.

Alan G.

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Emile van Sebille | 1 Nov 05:13 2003

Re: Determining systems maximum float value

"Marc Barry"
>
> import sys
>
> print sys.maxint
>
> #-----
>
> How can this be determined for floats?
>
http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=bc82gc%24naf%241%40peabody.colorado.edu

Emile van Sebille
emile <at> fenx.com

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Daniel Ehrenberg | 1 Nov 05:42 2003
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Re: function algebra

> I couldn't stand not doing it :)
> It's a bit less readable, but should handle any
> numerical operation.
> It also handles the case of "f=Fun(math.sin) + 5"
> (so that in this case
> f(x) will be math.sin(x) + 5), plus it does
> composition:
> 
> >>> cos=Fun(math.cos)
> >>> cs = cos.compose(math.sin)
> >>> cs(1)
> 0.66636674539288054
> >>> math.cos(math.sin(1))
> 0.66636674539288054
> >>> 
> 
> ------8<-------------
> # we don't need to add __iadd__ and such as those
> fall back to using
> # __add__ etc.
> unary_operators=['__neg__', '__pos__', '__abs__',
> '__invert__',
>                  '__complex__', '__int__',
> '__long__', '__float__',
>                  '__oct__', '__hex__']
> binary_operators=['__add__','__sub__','__mul__',
> '__floordiv__',
>                   '__mod__', '__divmod__',
> '__lshift__', '__rshift__',
>                   '__and__', '__xor__', '__or__',
(Continue reading)

Scott | 1 Nov 06:53 2003
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broken pipe

I've been working on an internet app, off and on, for quite some time,
and the socket module keeps throwing error/"broken pipe" exceptions. 
What exactly do these mean?  Also, less frequently, I see "connection
reset by peer."  What do I do about that?  Thanks.

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Lloyd Kvam | 1 Nov 16:15 2003

Re: broken pipe

"connection reset by peer" means that the computer sent a reset signal that
it was closing the connection.  This is a simple one-step termination.
The "normal" termination involves sending a FIN from each end to the other
end and getting an acknowledgement back.

You might find it useful to run a program like tcpdump to monitor the traffic
to help with debugging.  tcpdump is included with most linux distributions.

Scott wrote:

> I've been working on an internet app, off and on, for quite some time,
> and the socket module keeps throwing error/"broken pipe" exceptions. 
> What exactly do these mean?  Also, less frequently, I see "connection
> reset by peer."  What do I do about that?  Thanks.
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tutor maillist  -  Tutor <at> python.org
> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/tutor
> 

--

-- 
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Lebanon, NH 03766-1358

voice:	603-653-8139
fax:	801-459-9582
(Continue reading)

Alan Gauld | 1 Nov 18:48 2003
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Re: Re: test if file is not ascii

> for letter in line:
>    char = ord(letter)
>    if char < 20:

It should be possible to write a regex for all the letters 
below ASCII 20. Checking if the regex exists in the line 
is almost certainly faster than checking each character 
using Python.

Something like:
regex  = "["
for n in range(20): regex = regex+chr(n)
regex = regex+"]"
re.compile(regex)

> sys.stderr.write('File contains illegal characters.\n')
> return 101

It might be nicer to raise an exception. 
Certainly more Pythonic.

Alan G.

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Alan Gauld | 1 Nov 18:50 2003
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Re: Re: test if file is not ascii

> ... have you tried a regular expression?

Great minds think alike...

> bb = 'this is the search string that I want to see is in it...'
> if re.search('[\x00-\x19]',bb):

But for some reason I didn't think a range would work
- I don't know why!?!

> However, I don't know off the top of my head how to specify special
> characters in regexps... What I listed might work,

It seems to in the short test I did.

Alan G

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Daniel Ehrenberg | 1 Nov 20:12 2003
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New-style classes

I have heard about new-style classes, and I'm afraid
I'm using old-style classes (since I'm learning from a
book made for 2.0). Could somebody please explain what
new-style classes are and their benefit over old-style
classes?
Daniel Ehrenberg

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Lloyd Kvam | 1 Nov 20:45 2003

Re: New-style classes

http://www.python.org/doc/2.2.1/whatsnew/
What's New in Python 2.2

http://www.python.org/2.2/descrintro.html
Unifying types and classes in Python 2.2

The first link is by amk (just in case he's not watching the list).
The second is by GvR and will probably make more sense after reading
the section of amk's document dealing with the new classes.

Daniel Ehrenberg wrote:

> I have heard about new-style classes, and I'm afraid
> I'm using old-style classes (since I'm learning from a
> book made for 2.0). Could somebody please explain what
> new-style classes are and their benefit over old-style
> classes?
> Daniel Ehrenberg
> 
> __________________________________
> Do you Yahoo!?
> Exclusive Video Premiere - Britney Spears
> http://launch.yahoo.com/promos/britneyspears/
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Tutor maillist  -  Tutor <at> python.org
> http://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/tutor
> 

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Lloyd Kvam | 1 Nov 20:55 2003

Re: New-style classes

One more comment.  A "classic" class has a base class defined as:
	class Base:

A newstyle class has a base of object
	class Base(object):
or one of the other built in types (e.g. dict or list).  I have not
encountered any cases where code was broken my switching to the new
style classes.

Lloyd Kvam wrote:

> http://www.python.org/doc/2.2.1/whatsnew/
> What's New in Python 2.2
> 
> http://www.python.org/2.2/descrintro.html
> Unifying types and classes in Python 2.2
> 
> The first link is by amk (just in case he's not watching the list).
> The second is by GvR and will probably make more sense after reading
> the section of amk's document dealing with the new classes.
> 
> 
> Daniel Ehrenberg wrote:
> 
>> I have heard about new-style classes, and I'm afraid
>> I'm using old-style classes (since I'm learning from a
>> book made for 2.0). Could somebody please explain what
>> new-style classes are and their benefit over old-style
>> classes?
>> Daniel Ehrenberg
(Continue reading)


Gmane