Oleg Broytman | 20 Dec 19:19 2014
X-Face

SQLObject 2.0

Hello!

I'm pleased to announce version 2.0.0, the first stable release of branch
2.0 of SQLObject.

What's new in SQLObject
=======================

Features & Interface
--------------------

* DateTimeCol and TimeCol can read and write values with microseconds.

  WARNING: microseconds are supported by MariaDB since version 5.3.0 and
  by MySQL since version 5.6.4, and even these versions require special
  handling: columns to store microseconds have to be declared with
  precision 6: TIME(6), DATETIME(6), TIMESTAMP(6). SQLObject does the
  right thing when creating a new database but existing databases have
  to be changed: run something like
  ``ALTER TABLE name MODIFY COLUMN col TIME(6)`` for every column that
  you want to store microseconds.

  WARNING: backward compatibility problem! Date/Time columns created
  with microseconds cannot be read back from SQLite databases (and
  perhaps other backends) with versions of SQLObject older than 1.7.

Minor features
--------------

* PostgresConnection, when used with fromDatabase=True, sets alternateID
(Continue reading)

Oleg Broytman | 18 Dec 18:22 2014
X-Face

SQLObject 1.7.3

Hello!

I'm pleased to announce version 1.7.3, a release with minor
documentation update of branch 1.7 of SQLObject.

What's new in SQLObject
=======================

* Extend setup.py: include docs and tests into the egg.

For a more complete list, please see the news:
http://sqlobject.org/News.html

What is SQLObject
=================

SQLObject is an object-relational mapper.  Your database tables are described
as classes, and rows are instances of those classes.  SQLObject is meant to be
easy to use and quick to get started with.

SQLObject supports a number of backends: MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite,
Firebird, Sybase, MSSQL and MaxDB (also known as SAPDB).

Python 2.6 or 2.7 is required.

Where is SQLObject
==================

Site:
http://sqlobject.org
(Continue reading)

Oleg Broytman | 18 Dec 18:22 2014
X-Face

SQLObject 1.6.4

Hello!

I'm pleased to announce version 1.6.4, a release with minor
documentation update of branch 1.6 of SQLObject.

What's new in SQLObject
=======================

* Extend setup.py: include docs and tests into the egg.

For a more complete list, please see the news:
http://sqlobject.org/News.html

What is SQLObject
=================

SQLObject is an object-relational mapper.  Your database tables are described
as classes, and rows are instances of those classes.  SQLObject is meant to be
easy to use and quick to get started with.

SQLObject supports a number of backends: MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite,
Firebird, Sybase, MSSQL and MaxDB (also known as SAPDB).

Python 2.5 or higher is required.

Where is SQLObject
==================

Site:
http://sqlobject.org
(Continue reading)

Oleg Broytman | 18 Dec 18:21 2014
X-Face

SQLObject 1.5.6

Hello!

I'm pleased to announce version 1.5.6, a release with minor
documentation update of branch 1.5 of SQLObject.

What's new in SQLObject
=======================

* Extend setup.py: include docs and tests into the egg.

For a more complete list, please see the news:
http://sqlobject.org/News.html

What is SQLObject
=================

SQLObject is an object-relational mapper.  Your database tables are described
as classes, and rows are instances of those classes.  SQLObject is meant to be
easy to use and quick to get started with.

SQLObject supports a number of backends: MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite,
Firebird, Sybase, MSSQL and MaxDB (also known as SAPDB).

Python 2.4 or higher is required.

Where is SQLObject
==================

Site:
http://sqlobject.org
(Continue reading)

Oleg Broytman | 14 Dec 15:51 2014
X-Face

SQLObject 1.7.2

Hello!

I'm pleased to announce version 1.7.2, a bugfix release of branch
1.7 of SQLObject.

What's new in SQLObject
=======================

* Fix a bug: zero-pad microseconds on the right, not on the left; 0.0835
  seconds means 83500 microseconds.

For a more complete list, please see the news:
http://sqlobject.org/News.html

What is SQLObject
=================

SQLObject is an object-relational mapper.  Your database tables are described
as classes, and rows are instances of those classes.  SQLObject is meant to be
easy to use and quick to get started with.

SQLObject supports a number of backends: MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite,
Firebird, Sybase, MSSQL and MaxDB (also known as SAPDB).

Where is SQLObject
==================

Site:
http://sqlobject.org

(Continue reading)

Oleg Broytman | 11 Dec 13:46 2014
X-Face

SQLObject 1.7.1, 1.6.3, 1.5.5

Hello!

I'm pleased to announce versions 1.7.1, 1.6.3 and 1.5.5, documentation
update releases of SQLObject.

What's new in SQLObject
=======================

* Documentation update: change URLs for development with git, add
  Travis CI build status image.

* Extend sdist: include everything (even generated html)
  into source distribution.

For a more complete list, please see the news:
http://sqlobject.org/News.html

What is SQLObject
=================

SQLObject is an object-relational mapper.  Your database tables are described
as classes, and rows are instances of those classes.  SQLObject is meant to be
easy to use and quick to get started with.

SQLObject supports a number of backends: MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite,
Firebird, Sybase, MSSQL and MaxDB (also known as SAPDB).

Where is SQLObject
==================

(Continue reading)

Fetchinson . | 10 Dec 00:47 2014

caching an expensive property

What's the best strategy for some kind of caching of an expensive property?

Let's say I have the following:

class obj( SQLObject ):
    somefield = StringCol( )
    someotherfield = StringCol( )

    def _get_expensivestuff( self ):
        # takes a long time
        return result

And if my obj instance is alive for a long time and expensivestuff
gets accessed many times I'd like to just compute result once, store
it somewhere (where?) and return it from there.

I'm aware of memoizing the result of a function using a suitable
decorator but I'm concerned about thread safety and I'm not terribly
knowledgeable about the internals of sqlobject.

Any ideas would help a lot. Thanks,
Daniel

--

-- 
Psss, psss, put it down! - http://www.cafepress.com/putitdown

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Download BIRT iHub F-Type - The Free Enterprise-Grade BIRT Server
from Actuate! Instantly Supercharge Your Business Reports and Dashboards
with Interactivity, Sharing, Native Excel Exports, App Integration & more
(Continue reading)

Oleg Broytman | 8 Dec 22:32 2014
X-Face

SQLObject 1.7.0

Hello!

I'm pleased to announce version 1.7.0, the first stable release of branch
1.7 of SQLObject.

What's new in SQLObject
=======================

* Python 2.5 is no longer supported. The minimal supported version is
  Python 2.6.

* DateTimeCol and TimeCol can read values with microseconds (created by
  SQLObject 2.0) but do not write microseconds back.

* Upgrade ez_setup to 2.2.

* Adapt duplicate error message strings for SQLite 3.8.

* Allow unicode in .orderBy(u'-column').

* Fix a minor bug in MSSQLConnection: do not override callable server_version
  with a non-callable.

Contributors for this release are Geoffrey Wossum, Neil Muller and
Andrew Trusty.

For a more complete list, please see the news:
http://sqlobject.org/News.html

What is SQLObject
(Continue reading)

Oleg Broytman | 8 Dec 22:32 2014
X-Face

SQLObject 1.6.2

Hello!

I'm pleased to announce version 1.6.2, a bugfix release of branch
1.6 of SQLObject.

What's new in SQLObject
=======================

* Fix a minor bug in MSSQLConnection: do not override callable server_version
  with a non-callable.

For a more complete list, please see the news:
http://sqlobject.org/News.html

What is SQLObject
=================

SQLObject is an object-relational mapper.  Your database tables are described
as classes, and rows are instances of those classes.  SQLObject is meant to be
easy to use and quick to get started with.

SQLObject supports a number of backends: MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite,
Firebird, Sybase, MSSQL and MaxDB (also known as SAPDB).

Where is SQLObject
==================

Site:
http://sqlobject.org

(Continue reading)

Oleg Broytman | 8 Dec 22:32 2014
X-Face

SQLObject 1.5.4

Hello!

I'm pleased to announce version 1.5.4, a bugfix release of branch
1.5 of SQLObject.

What's new in SQLObject
=======================

* Fix a minor bug in MSSQLConnection: do not override callable server_version
  with a non-callable.

For a more complete list, please see the news:
http://sqlobject.org/News.html

What is SQLObject
=================

SQLObject is an object-relational mapper.  Your database tables are described
as classes, and rows are instances of those classes.  SQLObject is meant to be
easy to use and quick to get started with.

SQLObject supports a number of backends: MySQL, PostgreSQL, SQLite,
Firebird, Sybase, MSSQL and MaxDB (also known as SAPDB).

Where is SQLObject
==================

Site:
http://sqlobject.org

(Continue reading)

Ian Cordasco | 1 Dec 15:53 2014
Picon

Proposed Plan for Porting to Python 3

Hey all,

I see there's been some discussion of late about porting the library
to support Python 3. I'm a *very occasional* user of SQLObject and
I've not contributed thus far, but I have some experience porting
code-bases to support Python 3. The following is the sum of my
experiences and is by no means absolute fact or the experiences of
others.

I'm personally of the opinion that having separate branches for Python
2 and Python 3 is a really bad idea. It works for some but it is way
too much overhead and it always ends up in something getting out of
sync. The best way forward is to have one codebase that works on
Python 2 and Python 3.

First, I've found it far easier to support Python 3 once Python 2.5
support has been dropped. It is possible to support Python 2.5 (pep8,
pyflakes, mccabe, and flake8 are all projects which do this) but it is
tricky. It would be up to the community whether it wants to support
2.5 or not and I really don't feel right in telling you to drop
support for it altogether (although planning that may be a good idea).

Second, a strategy that Alex Gaynor uses is to run flake8 under python
2 and python 3. A quick look at SQLObject's source makes me believe
this is suboptimal at this point. The code mostly complies with pep8
but would still have a lot of extraneous output generated by the pep8
tool that flake8 uses. The reason for using flake8 is that pyflakes
(which flake8 uses) compiles the code using the AST and when
compilation fails, it tells you for which file(s) it failed and where.
This will help us simply make the code *run* on Python 3.
(Continue reading)


Gmane