Maciej Fijalkowski | 27 May 09:24 2016
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Found on the internet

Another game boy emulator using RPython https://github.com/Baekalfen/PyBoy
Daniel Hnyk | 19 May 14:58 2016
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Question about funding, again

Hello,

my question is simple. It strikes me why you don't have more financial support, since PyPy might save quite a lot of resources compared to CPython. When we witness that e.g. microsoft is able to donate $100k to Jupyter (https://ipython.org/microsoft-donation-2013.html), why PyPy, being even more generic then Jupyter, has problem to raise few tenths of thousands. 

I can find few mentions about this on the internet, but no serious article or summary is out there.

Have you tried any of the following?

1. Trying to get some funding from big companies and organizations such as Google, Microsoft, RedHat or some other like Free Software Foundation? If not, why not?
2. Crowd founding websites such as Kickstarter or Indiegogo get quite a big attention nowadays even for similar projects. There were successful campaigns for projects with even smaller target group, such as designers (https://krita.org/) or video editors (openshot 2). Why haven't you created a campaign there? Micropython, again, with much smaller target group of users had got funded as well. 

Is someone working on this subject? Or is there a general lack of man power in PyPy's team? Couldn't be someone hired from money already collected? 

Thanks for an answer,
Daniel
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Maciej Fijalkowski | 19 May 18:12 2016
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Re: Forwarding...

Hi Daniel.

We've done all of the proposed scenarios. We had some success talking
to companies, but there is a lot of resistance for various reasons
(and the successful proposals I can't talk about), including the
inability to pay open source from the engineering budget and instead
doing it via the marketing budget (which is orders of magnitude
slower). In short - you need to offer them something in exchange,
which usually means you need to do a good job, but not good enough (so
you can fix it for money). This is a very perverse incentive, btu this
is how it goes.

As for kickstarter - that targets primarily end-user experience and
not infrastructure. As such, it's hard to find money from users for
infrastructure, because it has relatively few direct users - mostly
large companies.

As for who is working on this subject - I am. Feel free to get in
touch with me via other channels (private mail, gchat, IRC) if you
have deeper insights

Best regards,
Maciej Fijalkowski

On Thu, May 19, 2016 at 5:11 PM, Armin Rigo <arigo <at> tunes.org> wrote:
> On 19 May 2016 at 14:58,  <pypy-dev-owner <at> python.org> wrote:
>> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
>> From: Daniel Hnyk <hnykda <at> gmail.com>
>> To: pypy-dev <at> python.org
>> Cc:
>> Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 12:58:36 +0000
>> Subject: Question about funding, again
>> Hello,
>>
>> my question is simple. It strikes me why you don't have more financial support, since PyPy might save
quite a lot of resources compared to CPython. When we witness that e.g. microsoft is able to donate $100k to
Jupyter (https://ipython.org/microsoft-donation-2013.html), why PyPy, being even more generic
then Jupyter, has problem to raise few tenths of thousands.
>>
>> I can find few mentions about this on the internet, but no serious article or summary is out there.
>>
>> Have you tried any of the following?
>>
>> 1. Trying to get some funding from big companies and organizations such as Google, Microsoft, RedHat or
some other like Free Software Foundation? If not, why not?
>> 2. Crowd founding websites such as Kickstarter or Indiegogo get quite a big attention nowadays even for
similar projects. There were successful campaigns for projects with even smaller target group, such as
designers (https://krita.org/) or video editors (openshot 2). Why haven't you created a campaign
there? Micropython, again, with much smaller target group of users had got funded as well.
>>
>> Is someone working on this subject? Or is there a general lack of man power in PyPy's team? Couldn't be
someone hired from money already collected?
>>
>> Thanks for an answer,
>> Daniel
> _______________________________________________
> pypy-dev mailing list
> pypy-dev <at> python.org
> https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/pypy-dev
Armin Rigo | 19 May 17:11 2016

Forwarding...

On 19 May 2016 at 14:58,  <pypy-dev-owner <at> python.org> wrote:
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Daniel Hnyk <hnykda <at> gmail.com>
> To: pypy-dev <at> python.org
> Cc:
> Date: Thu, 19 May 2016 12:58:36 +0000
> Subject: Question about funding, again
> Hello,
>
> my question is simple. It strikes me why you don't have more financial support, since PyPy might save quite
a lot of resources compared to CPython. When we witness that e.g. microsoft is able to donate $100k to
Jupyter (https://ipython.org/microsoft-donation-2013.html), why PyPy, being even more generic
then Jupyter, has problem to raise few tenths of thousands.
>
> I can find few mentions about this on the internet, but no serious article or summary is out there.
>
> Have you tried any of the following?
>
> 1. Trying to get some funding from big companies and organizations such as Google, Microsoft, RedHat or
some other like Free Software Foundation? If not, why not?
> 2. Crowd founding websites such as Kickstarter or Indiegogo get quite a big attention nowadays even for
similar projects. There were successful campaigns for projects with even smaller target group, such as
designers (https://krita.org/) or video editors (openshot 2). Why haven't you created a campaign
there? Micropython, again, with much smaller target group of users had got funded as well.
>
> Is someone working on this subject? Or is there a general lack of man power in PyPy's team? Couldn't be
someone hired from money already collected?
>
> Thanks for an answer,
> Daniel
Eli Stevens (Gmail | 18 May 07:43 2016
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Looking into numpy ndarray.flags.writeable

The following works on cpython, but fails on pypy:

    import numpy as np
    def test_writeable():
        a = np.zeros((2,2), np.int8)
>       a.flags.writeable = False
E       TypeError: readonly attribute

So I went and installed pypy's fork of numpy from source, and tried to
start poking around looking for tests, etc. to see what was going on.

It looks like numpy/core/tests/test_multiarray.py
TestFlags.test_writeable is doing something similar, but when I
attempt to run the tests like so:

pypy -c "import numpy; numpy.test()"

(Is that the right way to do it?)

It looks like the only thing that gets referenced from the
test_multiarray.py file is:

======================================================================
ERROR: Failure: AttributeError ('module' object has no attribute 'datetime64')
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/Users/elis/venv/droidblue-pypy/site-packages/nose/loader.py",
line 418, in loadTestsFromName
    addr.filename, addr.module)
  File "/Users/elis/venv/droidblue-pypy/site-packages/nose/importer.py",
line 47, in importFromPath
    return self.importFromDir(dir_path, fqname)
  File "/Users/elis/venv/droidblue-pypy/site-packages/nose/importer.py",
line 94, in importFromDir
    mod = load_module(part_fqname, fh, filename, desc)
  File "/Users/elis/venv/droidblue-pypy/site-packages/numpy/core/tests/test_multiarray.py",
line 2712, in <module>
    class TestArgmax(TestCase):
  File "/Users/elis/venv/droidblue-pypy/site-packages/numpy/core/tests/test_multiarray.py",
line 2733, in TestArgmax
    ([np.datetime64('1923-04-14T12:43:12'),
AttributeError: 'module' object has no attribute 'datetime64'

(And this is after I have to comment out a bunch of imports that can't
be found, etc.)

My reading of this is that none of the tests in the test_multiarray.py
file are even being attempted due to a missing datetime64. Is that
correct?

Since we're not supposed to touch the numpy source if at all possible,
what's the suggested approach for getting the TestFlags tests to a
state where I can run them (besides just hacking away at the source
file, as it seems unlikely that would be an acceptable patch)? I'm not
certain if I'm going to be able to invest the time to fix the
writeable flag, but I'd like to give it a go, at least.

Anything else in particular I should be aware of, when it comes to flags, etc.?

Thanks,
Eli
Carl Friedrich Bolz | 17 May 12:50 2016
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RUMPLE'16 Call for Papers

============================================================================
                        Call for Papers: RUMPLE’16
                                                          1st Workshop
on ReUsable and Modular
                      Programming Language Ecosystems

Co-located with SPLASH
                   Oct/Nov, 2016, Amsterdam, Netherlands

http://2016.splashcon.org/track/rumple2016
============================================================================

The RUMPLE workshop is a venue for discussing modular approaches to
programming language implementations, extensible virtual machine
architectures, as well as reusable runtime components such as dynamic
compilers, interpreters, or garbage collectors. The main goal of the
workshop
is to bring together researchers and practitioners, and facilitate the
sharing of experiences and ideas.

Relevant topics include, but are definitely not limited to, the following:

- Extensible VM design (compiler- or interpreter-based VMs)
- Reusable implementation of runtime components (e.g. interpreters, garbage
  collectors, intermediate representations)
- Static and dynamic compiler techniques for different languages
- Multi-language runtimes and mechanisms for cross-language interoperability
  between different languages
- Tooling support for different languages (e.g. debugging, profiling, etc.)
- Modular language implementations that use existing frameworks and systems
- Case studies of existing language implementations, virtual machines, and
  runtime components (e.g. design choices, tradeoffs, etc.)
- New research ideas on how we want to build languages in the future.

  Workshop Format and Submissions

This workshop welcomes the presentation and discussion of new ideas and
emerging problems that give a chance for interaction and exchange.
We accept presentation proposals in the form of extended abstracts (1-4
pages). Accepted abstracts will be published on the workshop's website
before
the workshop date.

Submissions should use the ACM SIGPLAN Conference Format, 10 point font,
using the font family Times New Roman and numeric citation style. All
submissions should be in PDF format.

Please submit abstracts through http://ssw.jku.at/rumple/

  Important Dates

- Exended abstract submission: 1 Aug 2016
- Author notification: 5 Sep 2016
All deadlines are Anywhere on Earth (AoE), i.e. GMT/UTC−12:00 hour
- Workshop: 31 Oct 2016

  Program Committee

Walter Binder, University of Lugano
Carl Friedrich Bolz, King's College London
Richard Jones, University of Kent
Stephen Kell, University of Cambridge
Jan Vitek, Northeastern University
Christian Wimmer, Oracle Labs

  Workshop Organizers

Matthias Grimmer, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria
Laurence Tratt, King's College London, United Kingdom
Adam Welc, Oracle Labs, United States

For questions or concerns, please mail to matthias.grimmer at jku.at

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Eli Stevens (Gmail | 14 May 01:19 2016
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Game state search dominated by copy.deepcopy

Hello,

I'm in the process of working on a hobby project to have an AI
searching through a game state space. I recently ran what I have so
far on pypy (I had been doing initial work on cpython), and got two
results that were unexpected:

- The total execution time was basically identical between cpython and pypy
- The runtime on both pythons was about 50% copy.deepcopy (called on
the main game state object)

The runtime of the script that I've been using is in the 30s to 2m
range, depending on config details, and the implementation fits the
following pretty well:

"""
 The JIT is generally good at speeding up straight-forward Python code
that spends a lot of time in the bytecode dispatch loop, i.e., running
actual Python code – as opposed to running things that only are
invoked by Python code. Good examples include numeric calculations or
any kind of heavily object-oriented program.
"""

I have already pulled out constant game information (static info like
unit stats, etc.) into an object that isn't copied, and a lot of the
numerical data that is copied is stored in a numpy array so that I
don't have hundreds of dicts, ints, etc.

First, is there a good way to speed up object copying? I've tried
pickling to a cache, and unpickling from there (so as to only pickle
once), but that didn't make a significant difference.

http://vmprof.com/#/905dfb71d28626bff6341a5848deae73 (deepcopy)
http://vmprof.com/#/545f1243b345eb9e41d73a9043a85efd (pickle)

Second, what's the best way to start figuring out why pypy isn't able
to outperform cpython on my program?

Thanks for any pointers,
Eli
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Carl Friedrich Bolz | 12 May 12:25 2016
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call for papers: Dynamic Language Symposium 2016, Nov 1, Amsterdam

Call for papers

## 12th Dynamic Languages Symposium (DLS 2016)

### Co-located with SPLASH 2016
### In association with ACM SIGPLAN
### November 1, 2016, Amsterdam

<http://www.dynamic-languages-symposium.org/dls-16/index.html>

The 12th Dynamic Languages Symposium (DLS) at SPLASH 2016 invites high
quality papers reporting original research and experience related to the
design, implementation, and applications of dynamic languages.  Areas of
interest include but are not limited to:

  *  Innovative language features
  *  Innovative implementation techniques
  *  Innovative applications
  *  Development environments and tools
  *  Experience reports and case studies
  *  Domain-oriented programming
  *  Very late binding, dynamic composition, and run-time adaptation
  *  Reflection and meta-programming
  *  Software evolution
  *  Language symbiosis and multi-paradigm languages
  *  Dynamic optimization
  *  JIT compilation
  *  Soft/optional/gradual typing
  *  Hardware support
  *  Educational approaches and perspectives
  *  Semantics of dynamic languages

### Submissions and proceedings

Submissions must not have been published previously nor being under
review at other events. Research papers should describe work that
advances the current state of the art. Experience papers should be of
broad interest and should describe insights gained from substantive
practical applications. The program committee will evaluate each
contributed paper based on its relevance, significance, clarity,
and originality.

Papers are to be submitted electronically at <https://dls16.hotcrp.com/>
in PDF format.  Submissions must be in the ACM format with 10-point
fonts and should not exceed 12 pages.  Please see full details in the
following link:

<http://conf.researchr.org/track/dls-2016/dls-2016-papers#Instructions-for-Authors>

DLS 2016 will run a two-phase reviewing process to help authors make
their final papers the best that they can be.  Accepted papers will be
published in the ACM Digital Library and will be freely available for
one month, starting two weeks before the event.

### Important dates

*    Submissions: Jun 10, 2016 (UTC, firm deadline)
*    First phase notification: Jul 22, 2016
*    Revisions due: July 29, 2016
*    Final notification: Aug 14, 2016
*    Camera ready: Aug 26, 2016
*    DLS: Nov 1, 2016

**AUTHORS TAKE NOTE:** The official publication date is the date the
proceedings are made available in the ACM Digital Library. This date
may be up to two weeks prior to the first day of your conference. The
official publication date affects the deadline for any patent filings
related to published work.

### Program chair
Roberto Ierusalimschy, PUC-Rio, Brazil

dls16 <at> inf.puc-rio.br

### Program committee

* Carl Friedrich Bolz, King’s College London, UK
* Gilad Bracha, Google, USA
* Marcus Denker, INRIA, France
* Zachary DeVito, Stanford, USA
* Jonathan Edwards, CDG Labs, USA
* Matthew Flatt, University of Utah, USA
* Elisa Gonzalez Boix, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium
* Robert Hirschfeld, Hasso Plattner Institute Potsdam, Germany
* Roberto Ierusalimschy, PUC-Rio, Brazil (chair)
* Shriram Krishnamurthi, Brown University, USA
* Benjamin Livshits, Microsoft Research, USA
* Priya Nagpurkar, IBM Research, USA
* Joe Gibbs Politz, Swarthmore College, USA
* Chris Seaton, Oracle Labs, UK
* Manuel Serrano, INRIA, France
* Sam Tobin-Hochstadt, Indiana University, USA
* Laurence Tratt, King’s College London, UK
* Jan Vitek, Northeastern University, USA
* Haichuan Wang, Huawei America Research Center, USA
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Omer Katz | 9 May 07:56 2016
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Copying a slice of a list in RPython

Hi guys,
While implementing the BList strategy I found a need to be able to efficiently copy part of a list to another list (and sometimes to the same list).
I'd rather avoid implementing something like https://github.com/DanielStutzbach/blist/blob/master/blist/_blist.c#L189 if it already exists in RPython.
Someone on IRC mentioned that there is a function in the rgc module called ll_arraycopy but I'm unsure how to use it.
I could implement it myself but I don't think it should live under objspace/listobject.py. Is there a utility module for objspace I should put those functions in?

Thanks,
Omer Katz.
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Armin Rigo | 8 May 15:33 2016

Fwd: Bounce action notification

Hi all,

I wanted to communicate this to whoever added the pypy-dev list to
"all-mail-archive.com": the subsciption has been disabled---excessive
or fatal bounces.

Armin
Sayth Renshaw | 7 May 14:45 2016
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Create own windows distribution - Borrowing from github repo and conda

Hi

Wanting to know from your experience how hard it would be to create a python distribution for windows based on pypy ?

For example if it contained the "essential" and sometimes hardest packages plus a few of the biggest names would this be feasible? For example as packages numpy, django, scikit, matplotlib or bokeh and spyder and ipython.

For example in the anaconda distribution there is a github repo https://github.com/rvianello/conda-pypy which has created the option to replace the conda config and direct all packages to a different repo and use pypy as the default distribution.

using something like that as a base and borrowing from the conda base would this be feasible, got to be good from an adoption stand point.

Thoughts?

Sayth
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Gmane