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Stumped by 3rd party testing



I was asked a question yesterday and I’m stuck for an approach.

 

It’s not related to my workplace, we have teams with good mix of development, testing and design skills, but I was asked this by an ex co-worker who is looking to improve current work practices in his new place.

 

They are looking at scrum as an option.

 

So my first question was to ask what is the problem they are trying to solve and then  we could see what suits. I saw this as a coaching opportunity and a valuable learning experience for me, even if it’s just a conversation over a few pints.  

 

So I started to dig deeper.  Most of the questions revolved around scrum, user stories, acceptance criteria, definition of done, and the need to improve time to market. Ok so far.

 

Then we came to team structure. Through discussion it was mentioned that they have a 3rd party test team that they pass everything over to towards the end of an iteration and then they fix the issues in the next iteration.

 

Smelly alarm bells and lots of spinning cogs.

 

So some points I’d need to consider are to see if it’s about throwing code over the wall, getting them to look at the perceived reduced cost, and asking how this 3rd party actually works. How do they communicate what stories they are working on, how do they test, how are things reported back?

 

Then thinking about this a bit more, the only way I can see this working is if the 3rd party can provide an agile testing service and be actively involved in that iteration; be it planning, any daily stand-ups, looking at remote pairing, and generally being in the loop. Now that could be done via skype, hangouts or webex/join.me. Looking at developing joint ownership would be key.

 

I don’t see scrum working for them otherwise, unless anyone has any experience? If not,  there are some practices that might help them improve such as TDD, CI, and looking at their refactoring approach if it exists.

 

I’m just seeing lots of mini-waterfalls/shorter iterations.

 

Thanks

 

Richard

 

 

 

 

 



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Posted by: "Richard Griffiths" <richard <at> oneill-griffiths.net>


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The Value of Unit Testing Per Se

I am talking to a client dev manager who, while all on board with automated testing and continuous
integration, does not see the value in unit tests. This I see as a problem. His argument is that if the
automated system tests are fast enough, that is all you need to find any regressions. Moreover, if for some
reason you can’t exercise all the cases at that level, you the integration tests can. So writing unit
tests is generally a waste of time. 

I have two requests. First would be a very good article that addresses this specific argument and also
explains the benefits of JUnit (XUnit). This is DISTINCT from the value of TDD. I suspect the answer is
about code fragility but he argues that you can refactor and the system tests will catch any regressions.
Second, would be a great article on the deeper value of TDD and why it yields better design and cleaner code,
but that is less important to me right now. 

The first argument is the primary. I want to explain why Unit testing specifically has value, even if the
unit tests are written after the code. 

Any great references would be appreciated. 

Thanks, 

Michael

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Posted by: Michael Wollin <yahoo <at> mercurysw.com>
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Looking for beta testers



Hello, I'm looking for 10 beta testers for a new app that makes team communication with people & apps better.


If interested, please email me at brett <at> hall-inc.com. The only commitment is having time for a 10 minute survey once a week.


Thanks.



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Manage the Growing Pains of Scaling an Agile Team



I've written a Manage the Growing Pains of Scaling an Agile Team | 352 Blog detailing an experience I've had scaling a scrum team. I'd love to hear your thoughts, and I'm really interested to see how you've managed to scale an agile team effectively. Here's a preview of the post below:

One of the biggest challenges of developing a digital product is accepting that your core development team may not be enough to get a complex product out the door quickly. Agile and scrum provide a framework for lean development, but what happens when it’s time to ramp up production from proof of concept to large-scale digital product?

It’s dangerous to assume that the same team patterns will be appropriate at every size of product development. For instance, you may think that if a core team includes two designers and two back-end developers, then a team three times that size must have six designers and six developers to deliver three times more.

Unfortunately, that is rarely the case for teams that need to rapidly scale production. It’s one of the dangers inherent to scrum: what works for an established agile team may not work when you need to expand.




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Posted by: kategriggz <at> yahoo.com


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Agile UX

Agile UX is a topic I've ignored, and that has now come back to bite me. What would be the top references where I
can get the world of it? 

Michael

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Agile in China

Would someone please point me to references concerning agile training, coaching and transformation in
China? In particular, I'm interested in what have been specific real world experiences with cultural
challenges. 

This is to share with a client who asked me what differences there are. I've never been there and I certainly
known I don't know. :)

Thanks. 

Michael

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Bug Triages



Hello,


Recently I've come across a practice in the organization which has been there from pre-agile times. It is called bug triages. I'm struggling to grasp the role of this one in Scrum as I've never met in trusted sources any reference to 'bug triages'.

  • is this practice to be considered a part of product backlog refinement?
  • won't bug triages meeting create another standing session in addition to 'official' ceremonies?
  • how does it fit in Scrum (by spirit and letter),
  • are there any alternatives to 'bug triage' meeting?
I would greatly appreciate all the opinions and thoughts!


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Backlog Refinement as an Event Between Two Sprints



I just voted for the idea  'Include Backlog Refinement in the Scrum Events section' in Scrumguide.uservoice.com, proposed by Jose Luis Soria (http://scrumguide.uservoice.com/users/47440411-jose-luis-soria)

http://t.co/9HeoLDjyel

There I have expressed my opinion as follows:
"I agree with this idea.
Though planning is an ongoing activity & yet we have events like time-boxed Scrum Planning.
Similarly backlog refinement is ongoing as an individual activity of the PO  but still we need to have it additionally as an event with the entire team participation.
In fact I will go beyond this and suggest that this be scheduled as a time-boxed event (10 % of the Sprint duration) immediately after sprint retrospective and just before the next Sprint planning session of the next sprint. Scheduling backlog refinement meeting as an event during a sprint will shift the team member focus from the current sprint to the forthcoming sprint. This will be a case of context switching which has been regarded as a waste from Lean perspective.
But if a time-boxed backlog grooming is scheduled between two sprints the team can give full focus. So a typical 2-week sprint schedule will look like
Monday -First Half : Sprint Planning and
then after two weeks
Friday - First Half: Sprint Review and Sprint Retrospective
Friday - Second Half - Backlog refinement
Monday - First Half - Sprint Planning (next sprint)

One limitation with this approach is if the PO is not available on the Backlog Refinement Event is scheduled then it will get adversely impacted. But the same can be said of scheduled Sprint Planning session too."


Welcome your opinions.


- Gopinath

 





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How do you measure individual performance when using scrum?



This is something that has alluded me for a long time. How can you measure individual performance when you're working in a team framework, like scrum (and others)?


It would be nice to be able to use something like OKRs on an individual level. This opens up many opportunities for people to work how they like, but I'm wonder whether the cost is not being able to use a framework like scrum.


Does anyone have any experience of using OKRs with scrum? If so, what do your individual OKRs look like?


Thanks,


Mike



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minimally dependent Teams sharing a code base



All –

 

I’m looking for example cases of multiple teams in the same code base and sharing a product backlog releasing every sprint and functioning in a fairly independent manner.  Specifically, that their sprint commitments are Team-specific, and it is possible for one Team to fail their sprint while the other succeeds.  I’m also interested in hearing where the minimal dependencies are.

 

Thanks in advance for anything you can provide.

 

--- Jean

 


Jean Richardson

Azure Gate Consulting

~ Repatterning the Human Experience of Work

 

AzureGate.net

(503) 788-8998

Jean <at> AzureGate.net

 

 

 



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Fwd: Ron's 'Final Meeting of the Agile Alliance'




Wow Bradley, you really read different things then I do...

Y

scrambled by yPhone

Op 7-feb.-2015 om 18:15 heeft Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trainer and Coach chuck-lists2 <at> emailchuck.com [SCRUMDEVELOPMENT] <SCRUMDEVELOPMENT <at> yahoogroups.com> het volgende geschreven:

 

> No. Just no. I do not believe there should be a single umbrella, at least none more effective and controlling that the Agile Alliance, which can barely run a conference.

So, you *do* believe in a single umbrella, just an umbrella that is no more effective and controlling than barely being able to run a conference.

Did I understand you correctly?
-------
Charles Bradley
Professional Scrum Trainer
Scrum Coach-in-Chief
http://ScrumCrazy.com


From: "Ron Jeffries ronjeffries <at> acm.org [SCRUMDEVELOPMENT]" <SCRUMDEVELOPMENT <at> yahoogroups.com>
To: SCRUMDEVELOPMENT <at> yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, February 6, 2015 5:59 PM
Subject: Re: [SCRUMDEVELOPMENT] Ron's 'Final Meeting of the Agile Alliance'



Charles,

On Feb 6, 2015, at 3:55 PM, Charles Bradley - Professional Scrum Trainer and Coach chuck-lists2 <at> emailchuck.com [SCRUMDEVELOPMENT] <SCRUMDEVELOPMENT <at> yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Comes down to this fundamental disagreement:  In the context we are speaking in, I believe that competition is better to move us all forward, and you believe that cooperation under a single umbrella moves us forward to improvement better. 

No. Just no. I do not believe there should be a single umbrella, at least none more effective and controlling that the Agile Alliance, which can barely run a conference.

The story — it was a bloody story after all — was about renaming the Agile Alliance because everyone in software, Agile, Lean, Kanban, probably even Waterfall, had come together in peace, love, understanding and continued learning, instead of the petty crap we have today with this guy pissing on that guy’s method etc etc.

I really think the PMI is the best example of trying to do this in our industry --- it doesn't work as fast or as good as competition does.  SAFe(tm) might also be a good example of this.  For years the industry ignored the scaling market and now... all of the sudden... spurred on by the competition of Dean and Co, the Scrum Alliance has moved to have a scaling product, Scrum.org has moved to have a scaling product, and Jeff Sutherland's Scrum Inc has moved to have a scaling product, and finally, Craig Larman and Bas Vodde have moved quickly to re-establish their fine(and battle tested I might add) scaling approach as something more visible and digestible.

Business competition is just fine, as I’ve said oh fifteen times now. And one of the strengths of SAFe is that it explicitly incorporates Scrum and XP, as well as a whole bunch of Lean ideas. They don’t have everything right — no one ever will — but they ay well recognize better than any other method today that this stuff all fits together.

I am 100% in favor of a single Scrum team or Product Group working together toward a common purpose because the complexity is manageable (yet challenging) and purpose and incentives can be unified enough, but that's a completely different context than trying to unite people across the world towards a common purpose, especially when there is capitalistic money and market forces involved.  It's just not going to happen, and IMHO, it's a waste of time to try.  

For the thirty-first time, I’m not trying to create a monopoly. I do think Scrum would have been stronger over the last N years had Ken not gone out of his way to pretend that Lean didn’t exist. I think it’s ludicrous how DJA goes out of his way to trash Agile whenever he gives a talk, especially since he probably wouldn’t have a business at all did Agile not exist.

Not one company. One industry all looking at the same set of ideas, emphasizing the ones they like, maybe arguing about some of them, but not trashing each other, instead focusing on the real problems, which are about helping individuals and companies get things done. 

I guess I just don't believe in monopolies of any kind.  I don't know any other way to put it, so I think I've made my position clear on this topic.

For the seventy-third time, I am not proposing a monopoly. I am pointing out that we all have a wide range of common understanding and a common target.

I remain in respectful disagreement with you on this tiny percentage of stuff we don't agree about.  :-)  Great seeing you at Agile 2014 btw, and thanks for the great discussion we had on Agile in big companies.  I learn a lot from you... even when we don't agree.  :-)

Or when you disagree with yourself, because you’re definitely not disagreeing with me. I do not want a monopoly. I want mutual respect, less stupid effort spent trying to discredit the Agile/Kanban/Lean guy next door.

See you at the next conference ...

Ron Jeffries
Sometimes you just have to stop holding on with both hands, both feet, and your tail, to get someplace better. 
Of course you might plummet to the earth and die, but probably not: you were made for this.








--

Yves Hanoulle 
Phone 00 32 467 43 38 32

Skype YvesHanoulle

Blog: www.Hanoulle.be

Coaching Question Of the Day: http://twitter.com/Retroflection



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Gmane