Cy Burnot | 1 Mar 01:35 2012

Re: Interpreted Languages: PHP, Perl, Python, Ruby (Sheet One)

Sailfish has written on 2/29/2012 2:46 PM:
> REF: http://hyperpolyglot.org/scripting
> 
> For all you hackers who enjoy debating the esoteric intricacies of one 
> interpretive language vs. the other. Personally, I've always been 
> partial to machine language enter via switch registers but, then again, 
> I don't wish to date myself.

:-) Early 80's. IMSAI 8080 with 256 bytes of RAM.
Cy Burnot | 1 Mar 01:35 2012

Re: Interpreted Languages: PHP, Perl, Python, Ruby (Sheet One)

Ron Hunter has written on 2/29/2012 5:06 PM:
> On 2/29/2012 1:46 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> REF: http://hyperpolyglot.org/scripting
>>
>> For all you hackers who enjoy debating the esoteric intricacies of one
>> interpretive language vs. the other. Personally, I've always been
>> partial to machine language enter via switch registers but, then again,
>> I don't wish to date myself.
>>
> Hummm.  Nothing can beat toggling in the program on the switches, which 
> probably dates me, but I recall wiring panels for 'unit record' machines 
> as well.

Ever program an analog computer?
Dave Warren | 1 Mar 01:54 2012

Re: Apple Loophole Gives Developers Access to Photos

In the last episode of <OcudnQ3CWKjMP9PSnZ2dnUVZ_uWdnZ2d <at> mozilla.org>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter <at> charter.net> said:

>On 2/29/2012 1:54 PM, Dave Warren wrote:
>> In the last episode of<Peednalgycd9G9DSnZ2dnUVZ_sSdnZ2d <at> mozilla.org>,
>> Ron Hunter<rphunter <at> charter.net>  said:
>>
>>> On 2/28/2012 7:18 PM, Dave Warren wrote:
>>>> In the last episode of<R8ednR-jBK2L7NDSnZ2dnUVZ_qmdnZ2d <at> mozilla.org>,
>>>> Ron Hunter<rphunter <at> charter.net>   said:
>>>>
>>>>> What possible connection does allowing location for an App have with
>>>>> one's photos?
>>>>
>>>> Photos contain location embedded information.
>>> So?  That is no reason to make them available to any app that can access
>>> location information.  There is no logical connection between my photos
>>> most of which DO NOT contain location information, and, say Yelp, or
>>> Urbanspoon apps.
>>
>> There isn't a connection at all, applications have access to lots of
>> things without permission, that's just how iOS works.
>>
>> Location is special, and requires permission, so by extension of that,
>> photos (which, if taken on the iPhone, likely contain location
>> information in the EXIF data) also need this permission.
>Yes, the camera does need that permission, however, that doesn't mean 
>camera should be able to access my location based notifications.  

huh? They can't. Totally unrelated features and totally unrelated
(Continue reading)

Dave Warren | 1 Mar 01:54 2012

Re: Apple Loophole Gives Developers Access to Photos

In the last episode of <OcudnQzCWKhvP9PSnZ2dnUVZ_uUAAAAA <at> mozilla.org>,
Ron Hunter <rphunter <at> charter.net> said:

>On 2/29/2012 1:54 PM, Dave Warren wrote:
>> In the last episode of<PeednahgycelGtDSnZ2dnUVZ_sSdnZ2d <at> mozilla.org>,
>> Ron Hunter<rphunter <at> charter.net>  said:
>>
>> Prior to this control, applications had access to photos anyway.
>>
>> This particular control was added because applications could take a
>> reasonable guess as to your location, even once declined, by scanning
>> locations of previously taken photos.
>>
>> Like I said, it would be nice to see a decent permissions manager, but
>> at the moment that doesn't exist, right now the only permissions on the
>> iPhone revolve around background notifications and location information.
>
>Unfortunately, if one turns off location information, many of the more 
>convenient features of the iPhone can't be used.  Worse, what if someone 
>decides to download all 3.3GB of my pictures while I am on 3G?  I have 
>an 'unlimited' (ATT) plan, but me wife doesn't.

Who suggested turning off location information?

If you have applications that are accessing and transmitting your data
without your permission installed, might I suggest you uninstall them?

Understand that this functionality is also incredibly useful in
applications that use it responsibly, but like anything, it can be
abused. Absent a permissions management system there's little to prevent
(Continue reading)

Sailfish | 1 Mar 02:36 2012

Re: Interpreted Languages: PHP, Perl, Python, Ruby (Sheet One)

My bloviated meandering follows what Cy Burnot graced us with on 
2/29/2012 4:35 PM:
> Ron Hunter has written on 2/29/2012 5:06 PM:
>> On 2/29/2012 1:46 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>> REF: http://hyperpolyglot.org/scripting
>>>
>>> For all you hackers who enjoy debating the esoteric intricacies of one
>>> interpretive language vs. the other. Personally, I've always been
>>> partial to machine language enter via switch registers but, then again,
>>> I don't wish to date myself.
>>>
>> Hummm.  Nothing can beat toggling in the program on the switches, which 
>> probably dates me, but I recall wiring panels for 'unit record' machines 
>> as well.
> 
> Ever program an analog computer?

Not analog-only but I cut my digital molars programming both ends of one 
of these, 
http://archive.computerhistory.org/resources/text/Beckman/Beckman.HybridSoftware.1970.102646123.pdf

--

-- 
Sailfish - Netscape Champion
Mozilla Contributor Member - www.mozilla.org/credits/
Netscape/Mozilla Tips: http://www.ufaq.org/ , http://ilias.ca/
Rare Mozilla Stuff: https://www.projectit.com/
Ron Hunter | 1 Mar 03:04 2012
Picon

Re: Interpreted Languages: PHP, Perl, Python, Ruby (Sheet One)

On 2/29/2012 6:35 PM, Cy Burnot wrote:
> Ron Hunter has written on 2/29/2012 5:06 PM:
>> On 2/29/2012 1:46 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>> REF: http://hyperpolyglot.org/scripting
>>>
>>> For all you hackers who enjoy debating the esoteric intricacies of one
>>> interpretive language vs. the other. Personally, I've always been
>>> partial to machine language enter via switch registers but, then again,
>>> I don't wish to date myself.
>>>
>> Hummm.  Nothing can beat toggling in the program on the switches, which
>> probably dates me, but I recall wiring panels for 'unit record' machines
>> as well.
>
> Ever program an analog computer?
Nope.  I'm a digital kind of guy.
Ron Hunter | 1 Mar 03:06 2012
Picon

Re: Apple Loophole Gives Developers Access to Photos

On 2/29/2012 6:54 PM, Dave Warren wrote:
> In the last episode of<OcudnQ3CWKjMP9PSnZ2dnUVZ_uWdnZ2d <at> mozilla.org>,
> Ron Hunter<rphunter <at> charter.net>  said:
>
>> On 2/29/2012 1:54 PM, Dave Warren wrote:
>>> In the last episode of<Peednalgycd9G9DSnZ2dnUVZ_sSdnZ2d <at> mozilla.org>,
>>> Ron Hunter<rphunter <at> charter.net>   said:
>>>
>>>> On 2/28/2012 7:18 PM, Dave Warren wrote:
>>>>> In the last episode of<R8ednR-jBK2L7NDSnZ2dnUVZ_qmdnZ2d <at> mozilla.org>,
>>>>> Ron Hunter<rphunter <at> charter.net>    said:
>>>>>
>>>>>> What possible connection does allowing location for an App have with
>>>>>> one's photos?
>>>>>
>>>>> Photos contain location embedded information.
>>>> So?  That is no reason to make them available to any app that can access
>>>> location information.  There is no logical connection between my photos
>>>> most of which DO NOT contain location information, and, say Yelp, or
>>>> Urbanspoon apps.
>>>
>>> There isn't a connection at all, applications have access to lots of
>>> things without permission, that's just how iOS works.
>>>
>>> Location is special, and requires permission, so by extension of that,
>>> photos (which, if taken on the iPhone, likely contain location
>>> information in the EXIF data) also need this permission.
>> Yes, the camera does need that permission, however, that doesn't mean
>> camera should be able to access my location based notifications.
>
(Continue reading)

Ron Hunter | 1 Mar 03:10 2012
Picon

Re: Interpreted Languages: PHP, Perl, Python, Ruby (Sheet One)

On 2/29/2012 7:36 PM, Sailfish wrote:
> My bloviated meandering follows what Cy Burnot graced us with on
> 2/29/2012 4:35 PM:
>> Ron Hunter has written on 2/29/2012 5:06 PM:
>>> On 2/29/2012 1:46 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>>> REF: http://hyperpolyglot.org/scripting
>>>>
>>>> For all you hackers who enjoy debating the esoteric intricacies of one
>>>> interpretive language vs. the other. Personally, I've always been
>>>> partial to machine language enter via switch registers but, then again,
>>>> I don't wish to date myself.
>>>>
>>> Hummm. Nothing can beat toggling in the program on the switches,
>>> which probably dates me, but I recall wiring panels for 'unit record'
>>> machines as well.
>>
>> Ever program an analog computer?
>
> Not analog-only but I cut my digital molars programming both ends of one
> of these,
> http://archive.computerhistory.org/resources/text/Beckman/Beckman.HybridSoftware.1970.102646123.pdf
>
>
One of my least favorite data storage media.  Bulky, balky, inaccurate, 
and relatively fragile.  I was really glad to see the last of it.
I missed cards, they were great for taking notes, and for scooping up 
dirt.  Grin.
Sailfish | 1 Mar 05:31 2012

Re: Interpreted Languages: PHP, Perl, Python, Ruby (Sheet One)

My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on 
2/29/2012 6:10 PM:
> On 2/29/2012 7:36 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> My bloviated meandering follows what Cy Burnot graced us with on
>> 2/29/2012 4:35 PM:
>>> Ron Hunter has written on 2/29/2012 5:06 PM:
>>>> On 2/29/2012 1:46 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>>>> REF: http://hyperpolyglot.org/scripting
>>>>>
>>>>> For all you hackers who enjoy debating the esoteric intricacies of one
>>>>> interpretive language vs. the other. Personally, I've always been
>>>>> partial to machine language enter via switch registers but, then 
>>>>> again,
>>>>> I don't wish to date myself.
>>>>>
>>>> Hummm. Nothing can beat toggling in the program on the switches,
>>>> which probably dates me, but I recall wiring panels for 'unit record'
>>>> machines as well.
>>>
>>> Ever program an analog computer?
>>
>> Not analog-only but I cut my digital molars programming both ends of one
>> of these,
>>
http://archive.computerhistory.org/resources/text/Beckman/Beckman.HybridSoftware.1970.102646123.pdf 
>>
>>
>>
> One of my least favorite data storage media.  Bulky, balky, inaccurate, 
> and relatively fragile.  I was really glad to see the last of it.
(Continue reading)

Sailfish | 1 Mar 06:42 2012

Re: Introducing Windows 8 Consumer Preview

My bloviated meandering follows what WLS graced us with on 2/29/2012 
11:21 AM:
> On 02/29/2012 01:54 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> REF:
>> http://windowsteamblog.com/windows/b/windowsexperience/archive/2012/02/29/introducing-windows-8-consumer-preview.aspx
>>
>>
>> It's here ... all 3.3GBs of it.
>>
> 
> Since we are introducing Operating Systems.
> 
> openSUSE 12.2 Milestone 1 is here. All 4.7 GBs of it, if you  download
> the DVD, or you can sample a Live Gnome CD at 733 MB, or a Live KDE CD
> at 741 MB.
> 
> http://software.opensuse.org/developer/en
> 
Okay, I chose openSUSE for my KDE theme testing platform on VirtualBox. 
It seems to be quite a lot more sluggish that either Ubuntu or Mint when 
configured using the same resource levels but, on the positive note, the 
theme lots wonderful on it.

--

-- 
Sailfish - Netscape Champion
Mozilla Contributor Member - www.mozilla.org/credits/
Netscape/Mozilla Tips: http://www.ufaq.org/ , http://ilias.ca/
Rare Mozilla Stuff: https://www.projectit.com/

Gmane