Ken Springer | 1 Sep 01:02 2011

Re: Automatically Check For Updates

On 8/31/11 3:47 PM, Ron Hunter wrote:
> On 8/31/2011 2:58 PM, Ken Springer wrote:
>> On 8/30/11 8:27 AM, Ron Hunter wrote:
>>> On 8/30/2011 9:09 AM, PhillipJones wrote:
>>>> Daniel wrote:
>>>>> Bob Henson wrote:
>>>>>> On 26/08/2011 15:42, Ron Hunter wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> <Snip>
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Well, standards of education are falling everywhere, but it is
>>>>>> probably
>>>>>> only those of us of a certain age that notice. Most young folk don't
>>>>>> worry about spelling and certainly not grammar these days. Does it
>>>>>> matter? I think so, but no-one else seems to care much. I'm to old to
>>>>>> change now.
>>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Seems to me, the falling standards are the fault of my (and a lot of
>>>>> those here) generation. We got a good education at school, but then we
>>>>> teachers/parents of my age didn't ensure a good education was passed
>>>>> on.
>>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Back when we to school, people paid for taxes to run the schools. Not a
>>>> peep was said about the cost. My Mother was a room mother throughout
>>>> elementary school both for myself and my brother.
>>>>
(Continue reading)

Sailfish | 1 Sep 01:30 2011

Re: Where's the Outrage? Where's the Mob?

My bloviated meandering follows what David E. Ross graced us with on 
8/31/2011 3:55 PM:
> On 8/31/11 1:41 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> REF: 
>> http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2011/08/chromes-most-important-feature.html
>>
>> [excerpt quote ="
>> Chrome's rapid release cycle works well because of the autoupdater. 
>> Annoying users with notifications about the new releases makes people 
>> delay updating their browser. Some of them will find ways to disable the 
>> updater and will continue to use an old version of the browser. Ben 
>> Goodger thinks that making the updater invisible is very important:
>> " /]
>>
>> snicker, yuk! yuk!
>>
> 
> I did configuration management for a large software system for about 15
> years.  The system was used by the U.S. Air Force to operate a large
> variety of earth-orbiting space satellites.  Part of my task was to
> integrate into a single system software components developed by more
> than 10 different unrelated contractors.
> 
> The lessons I learned included:
> 
> 1.  Users need to know when software changes.  They need to evaluate how
> the changes to one component affect other components.  Yes, I
> participated in some of that evaluation; but some components bypassed me.
> 
> 2.  Users had to schedule their acceptance of new versions of the
(Continue reading)

David E. Ross | 1 Sep 01:37 2011

Re: Where's the Outrage? Where's the Mob?

On 8/31/11 4:30 PM, Sailfish wrote:
> My bloviated meandering follows what David E. Ross graced us with on 
> 8/31/2011 3:55 PM:
>> On 8/31/11 1:41 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>> REF: 
>>> http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2011/08/chromes-most-important-feature.html
>>>
>>> [excerpt quote ="
>>> Chrome's rapid release cycle works well because of the autoupdater. 
>>> Annoying users with notifications about the new releases makes people 
>>> delay updating their browser. Some of them will find ways to disable the 
>>> updater and will continue to use an old version of the browser. Ben 
>>> Goodger thinks that making the updater invisible is very important:
>>> " /]
>>>
>>> snicker, yuk! yuk!
>>>
>>
>> I did configuration management for a large software system for about 15
>> years.  The system was used by the U.S. Air Force to operate a large
>> variety of earth-orbiting space satellites.  Part of my task was to
>> integrate into a single system software components developed by more
>> than 10 different unrelated contractors.
>>
>> The lessons I learned included:
>>
>> 1.  Users need to know when software changes.  They need to evaluate how
>> the changes to one component affect other components.  Yes, I
>> participated in some of that evaluation; but some components bypassed me.
>>
(Continue reading)

Sailfish | 1 Sep 02:38 2011

Re: Where's the Outrage? Where's the Mob?

My bloviated meandering follows what David E. Ross graced us with on 
8/31/2011 4:37 PM:
> On 8/31/11 4:30 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> My bloviated meandering follows what David E. Ross graced us with on 
>> 8/31/2011 3:55 PM:
>>> On 8/31/11 1:41 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>>> REF: 
>>>> http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2011/08/chromes-most-important-feature.html
>>>>
>>>> [excerpt quote ="
>>>> Chrome's rapid release cycle works well because of the autoupdater. 
>>>> Annoying users with notifications about the new releases makes people 
>>>> delay updating their browser. Some of them will find ways to disable the 
>>>> updater and will continue to use an old version of the browser. Ben 
>>>> Goodger thinks that making the updater invisible is very important:
>>>> " /]
>>>>
>>>> snicker, yuk! yuk!
>>>>
>>> I did configuration management for a large software system for about 15
>>> years.  The system was used by the U.S. Air Force to operate a large
>>> variety of earth-orbiting space satellites.  Part of my task was to
>>> integrate into a single system software components developed by more
>>> than 10 different unrelated contractors.
>>>
>>> The lessons I learned included:
>>>
>>> 1.  Users need to know when software changes.  They need to evaluate how
>>> the changes to one component affect other components.  Yes, I
>>> participated in some of that evaluation; but some components bypassed me.
(Continue reading)

Ron Hunter | 1 Sep 03:18 2011
Picon

Re: Where's the Outrage? Where's the Mob?

On 8/31/2011 5:22 PM, Sailfish wrote:
> My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on
> 8/31/2011 2:58 PM:
>> On 8/31/2011 4:51 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on
>>> 8/31/2011 2:38 PM:
>>>> On 8/31/2011 3:41 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>>>> REF:
>>>>> http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2011/08/chromes-most-important-feature.html
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> [excerpt quote ="
>>>>> Chrome's rapid release cycle works well because of the autoupdater.
>>>>> Annoying users with notifications about the new releases makes people
>>>>> delay updating their browser. Some of them will find ways to
>>>>> disable the
>>>>> updater and will continue to use an old version of the browser. Ben
>>>>> Goodger thinks that making the updater invisible is very important:
>>>>> " /]
>>>>>
>>>>> snicker, yuk! yuk!
>>>>>
>>>> I believe that Google Chrome and Firefox have a vastly different
>>>> userbase. Going 'stealth' with updates would result in a backlash
>>>> against Mozilla that would be seen/heard on Mars! Mozilla devs WISH
>>>> they could 'force' updates, but understand that would be fatal to
>>>> their user confidence. Another case where what GC does Firefox can't
>>>> get away with. I HATE double-standards!
(Continue reading)

Ron Hunter | 1 Sep 03:24 2011
Picon

Re: Where's the Outrage? Where's the Mob?

On 8/31/2011 5:55 PM, David E. Ross wrote:
> On 8/31/11 1:41 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> REF:
>> http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2011/08/chromes-most-important-feature.html
>>
>> [excerpt quote ="
>> Chrome's rapid release cycle works well because of the autoupdater.
>> Annoying users with notifications about the new releases makes people
>> delay updating their browser. Some of them will find ways to disable the
>> updater and will continue to use an old version of the browser. Ben
>> Goodger thinks that making the updater invisible is very important:
>> " /]
>>
>> snicker, yuk! yuk!
>>
>
> I did configuration management for a large software system for about 15
> years.  The system was used by the U.S. Air Force to operate a large
> variety of earth-orbiting space satellites.  Part of my task was to
> integrate into a single system software components developed by more
> than 10 different unrelated contractors.
>
> The lessons I learned included:
>
> 1.  Users need to know when software changes.  They need to evaluate how
> the changes to one component affect other components.  Yes, I
> participated in some of that evaluation; but some components bypassed me.
>
> 2.  Users had to schedule their acceptance of new versions of the
> overall system to avoid impacts on critical tasks.  Only the users knew
(Continue reading)

Sailfish | 1 Sep 03:27 2011

Re: Where's the Outrage? Where's the Mob?

My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on 
8/31/2011 6:18 PM:
> On 8/31/2011 5:22 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on
>> 8/31/2011 2:58 PM:
>>> On 8/31/2011 4:51 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on
>>>> 8/31/2011 2:38 PM:
>>>>> On 8/31/2011 3:41 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>>>>> REF:
>>>>>> http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2011/08/chromes-most-important-feature.html 
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>> [excerpt quote ="
>>>>>> Chrome's rapid release cycle works well because of the autoupdater.
>>>>>> Annoying users with notifications about the new releases makes people
>>>>>> delay updating their browser. Some of them will find ways to
>>>>>> disable the
>>>>>> updater and will continue to use an old version of the browser. Ben
>>>>>> Goodger thinks that making the updater invisible is very important:
>>>>>> " /]
>>>>>>
>>>>>> snicker, yuk! yuk!
>>>>>>
>>>>> I believe that Google Chrome and Firefox have a vastly different
>>>>> userbase. Going 'stealth' with updates would result in a backlash
>>>>> against Mozilla that would be seen/heard on Mars! Mozilla devs WISH
(Continue reading)

Ron Hunter | 1 Sep 03:27 2011
Picon

Re: Where's the Outrage? Where's the Mob?

On 8/31/2011 6:37 PM, David E. Ross wrote:
> On 8/31/11 4:30 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>> My bloviated meandering follows what David E. Ross graced us with on
>> 8/31/2011 3:55 PM:
>>> On 8/31/11 1:41 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>>> REF:
>>>> http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2011/08/chromes-most-important-feature.html
>>>>
>>>> [excerpt quote ="
>>>> Chrome's rapid release cycle works well because of the autoupdater.
>>>> Annoying users with notifications about the new releases makes people
>>>> delay updating their browser. Some of them will find ways to disable the
>>>> updater and will continue to use an old version of the browser. Ben
>>>> Goodger thinks that making the updater invisible is very important:
>>>> " /]
>>>>
>>>> snicker, yuk! yuk!
>>>>
>>>
>>> I did configuration management for a large software system for about 15
>>> years.  The system was used by the U.S. Air Force to operate a large
>>> variety of earth-orbiting space satellites.  Part of my task was to
>>> integrate into a single system software components developed by more
>>> than 10 different unrelated contractors.
>>>
>>> The lessons I learned included:
>>>
>>> 1.  Users need to know when software changes.  They need to evaluate how
>>> the changes to one component affect other components.  Yes, I
>>> participated in some of that evaluation; but some components bypassed me.
(Continue reading)

Ron Hunter | 1 Sep 03:26 2011
Picon

Re: Where's the Outrage? Where's the Mob?

On 8/31/2011 6:30 PM, Sailfish wrote:
> My bloviated meandering follows what David E. Ross graced us with on
> 8/31/2011 3:55 PM:
>> On 8/31/11 1:41 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>> REF:
>>> http://googlesystem.blogspot.com/2011/08/chromes-most-important-feature.html
>>>
>>>
>>> [excerpt quote ="
>>> Chrome's rapid release cycle works well because of the autoupdater.
>>> Annoying users with notifications about the new releases makes people
>>> delay updating their browser. Some of them will find ways to disable
>>> the updater and will continue to use an old version of the browser.
>>> Ben Goodger thinks that making the updater invisible is very important:
>>> " /]
>>>
>>> snicker, yuk! yuk!
>>>
>>
>> I did configuration management for a large software system for about 15
>> years. The system was used by the U.S. Air Force to operate a large
>> variety of earth-orbiting space satellites. Part of my task was to
>> integrate into a single system software components developed by more
>> than 10 different unrelated contractors.
>>
>> The lessons I learned included:
>>
>> 1. Users need to know when software changes. They need to evaluate how
>> the changes to one component affect other components. Yes, I
>> participated in some of that evaluation; but some components bypassed me.
(Continue reading)

Ron Hunter | 1 Sep 03:38 2011
Picon

Re: Article on FF6

On 8/31/2011 5:01 PM, Sailfish wrote:
> My bloviated meandering follows what Ron Hunter graced us with on
> 8/31/2011 2:55 PM:
>> On 8/31/2011 1:23 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>> My bloviated meandering follows what Ken Springer graced us with on
>>> 8/31/2011 9:09 AM:
>>>> On 8/31/11 4:47 AM, David wrote:
>>>>> On 8/31/2011 5:31 AM, Bob Henson wrote:
>>>>>> Ron Hunter wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>> On 8/30/2011 2:06 PM, Sailfish wrote:
>>>>>>> I still fail to understand why so many people object to getting
>>>>>>> fixes,
>>>>>>> and new features faster. Seems to me that I recall some of the same
>>>>>>> sources complaining that Firefox was too slow to update on the old
>>>>>>> plan.
>>>>>>> Just what do these guys want?
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Ron, I'll guarantee that you haven't head of one solitary person who
>>>>>> really
>>>>>> objects to getting security fixes as often as Mozilla can throw them
>>>>>> out.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> This morning's Firefox 6.01 fixed a security problem . It *didn't
>>>>>> bump the
>>>>>> version number* thus breaking all the extensions, nor did it
>>>>>> completely
>>>>>> change the interface. Anyone who objects to that has got to be
>>>>>> seriously
>>>>>> weird. If it had, close on the heels of the last batch of unnecessary
(Continue reading)


Gmane