Bjorn Reese | 27 Aug 18:21 2015
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[boost] [http] Boost.Http review report

The outcome of the formal review of Boost.Http is that the library is
NOT accepted for inclusion into Boost this time.

Below I will first summarize the main themes running through the
review, and afterwards I will make some recommendations about how to
proceed from here.

The following reviews were posted:

- Antony Polukhin: No
- Darren Cook: No
- David Sankel: No
- Lee Clagett: No
- Niall Douglas: Yes, conditionally
- Roland Bock: No
- Tom Kent: No

The discussions were constructive and offered much valuable feedback.

There was a general consensus that Boost ought have a HTTP library,
but that Boost.Http was too incomplete in its present state.

Many reviewers mentioned the disconnect between their expectations and
what the library offered. There were several suggestions for alternative
names for the library to better reflect the feature-set it offers.

Boost.Http currently only provides a server-side API, but the reviewers
felt that a client-side API would be usable to more users.

There was also a recurring request for Boost.Http to be a header-only
(Continue reading)

Ahmed Charles | 23 Aug 03:08 2015

[boost] [afio] Formal review of Boost.AFIO

The formal review of the Boost.AFIO library starts, August 21st and ends 
on Monday August 31st.  

Boost.AFIO provides a portable API implementing synchronous and 
asynchronous race-free filesystem and scatter-gather file i/o. It requires 
a minimum of C++ 11. It has minimum dependencies on a Filesystem TS and a 
Networking TS implementation (e.g. Boost.Filesystem and Boost.ASIO). 
Backends are provided for the Windows NT kernel and POSIX.  

The utility of a portable library providing strong concurrent race 
guarantees about filesystem and file i/o can be seen in its tutorial where 
a transactional ACID key-value store is built from first principles.  

Boost.AFIO was brought to Boost as part of GSoC 2013 and Niall Douglas has 
continued to develop and improve the library since then, generating two 
internal implementation libraries Boost.APIBind and Boost.Monad which are 
expected to be separately brought for Boost review in 2016.

The documentation can be found here: 
https://boostgsoc13.github.io/boost.afio/doc/html/afio.html  

The source code can be found here: 
https://github.com/BoostGSoC13/boost.afio/tree/boost-peer-review  

Online web compiler playpen can be found here:
http://melpon.org/wandbox/permlink/DR8wCpu5Rl20GMdM?

Please answer the following questions: 

1. Should Boost.AFIO be accepted into Boost? Please state all 
(Continue reading)

Marshall Clow | 13 Aug 20:23 2015
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[boost] Boost 1.59.0 has been released

Release 1.59.0 of the Boost C++ Libraries is now available.

These open-source libraries work well with the C++ Standard Library, and
are usable across a broad spectrum of applications.
The Boost license encourages both commercial and non-commercial use.

This release contains two new libraries and numerous enhancements and bug
fixes for existing libraries.

New Libraries
* Convert: An extendible and configurable type-conversion framework, from
Vladimir Batov.
* Coroutine2:  from Oliver Kowalke

For details, including download links, see
http://www.boost.org/users/news/version_1.59.0

You can also download directly from SourceForge:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.59.0/

To install this release on your system, see
http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/release/more/getting_started/index.html

Thanks,

--The Boost release team

 Vladimir Prus
 Rene Rivera
 Marshall Clow
(Continue reading)

Bjorn Reese | 7 Aug 09:08 2015
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[boost] [http] Formal review of Boost.Http

Dear Boost and ASIO communities.

The formal review of Vinícius dos Santos Oliveira's Boost.Http library
starts today, August 7th and ends on Sunday August 16th.

Boost.Http is designed for various forms of modern HTTP interaction,
from normal HTTP request, over HTTP chunking and pipelining, to
upgrading to other web protocols like WebSocket. This library builds
on top of Boost.ASIO, and follows the threading model of ASIO.

The two basic building-blocks are http::socket, which is socket that
talks HTTP, and http::message with contains HTTP meta-data and body
information. You can use these building-blocks to build a HTTP server
that fits your exact needs; for instance, an embedded HTTP server for
a ReST API. Boost.Http comes with a light-weight HTTP server and a
static file server.

Currently, Boost.Http is limited to server-side interaction, but the
design principles used extends to client-side as well.

Boost.Http was originally developed as part of GSoC 2014 and Vinícius
has continued to develop and improve the library since then.

The documentation can be found here:

 http://boostgsoc14.github.io/boost.http/

The source code can be found here:

 https://github.com/BoostGSoC14/boost.http
(Continue reading)

Vladimir Prus | 24 Jul 09:16 2015
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[Boost-users] Boost.DLL formal review result


The Boost.DLL library is accepted. Congratulations to Antony, and thanks for everybody who
reviewed the library!

The votes were as follows:

- Ralf Globisch - Yes
- Klaim - Joël Lamotte - Yes
- Niall Douglas - Yes, conditionally
- John P Fletcher - Yes
- Bjorn Reese - Yes
- Edward Diener - Yes
- Rodrigo Madera - Yes
- Richard - Yes

I'd like to also thank Thomas Trummer, Rob Stewart and Ion Gaztañaga for their contribution to review.

The key suggestions from the review are listed below. None is critical enough to become a formal prerequisite, or 
require a mini-review. The library can  be added when Antony feels its ready.

Naming
-----------

There was a concern that "DLL" might sound windows specific, and search for best terminology. This
does not seem all that important, as soon as documentation introduces the terminology it uses, and is consistent.

OSX support
-------------------

The library was found not to work on OSX; I believe this issue was already fixed off-list with help from Rodrigo.

Documentation
----------------------

Several people requested improvements. Bjorn and John, in particular, pointed out specific issues. This seems to be the post important
change prior to adding the library.

Dependencies on Boost and system headers
----------------------------------------------------------------

It was suggested that the library does not depend on other Boost C++ Libraries. While it might be helpful to some users, I find it logically impossible for a Boost 
formal review to request that dependencies on Boost libraries be removed. 

It was also mentioned that Boost.DLL is header-only library and includes system headers that can bring a lot of symbols and maybe macros. I don't think an actual 
problem was reported, though, and there is no way to avoid the problem while staying header-only.

It's up to the author to consider these suggestions and do something, or don't do anything.

Continuous integration
--------------------------------

There was a recommendation from Niall to improve CI of the library, including static analysis, valgrind, Windows CI, showing CI status in documentation and so forth.
These are good suggestions. At the same time, they are not specific to Boost.DLL, and it's not the goal of a formal review to create new generic development 
process requirements. Many existing libraries of indisputably high quality do not have these requested mechanisms.

Therefore, the author can act on these suggestions as he sees fit.


Thanks,

--
_______________________________________________
Boost-users mailing list
Boost-users <at> lists.boost.org
http://lists.boost.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/boost-users
<div>
<div dir="ltr">
<div><br></div>
<div>The Boost.DLL library is accepted. Congratulations to Antony, and thanks for everybody who</div>
<div>reviewed the library!</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>The votes were as follows:</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>- Ralf Globisch - Yes<br>
</div>
<div>- Klaim - Jo&euml;l Lamotte - Yes<br>
</div>
<div>- Niall Douglas - Yes, conditionally<br>
</div>
<div>- John P Fletcher - Yes<br>
</div>
<div>
<div>- Bjorn Reese - Yes</div>
<div>- Edward Diener - Yes</div>
<div>
<span>- Rodrigo Madera - Yes</span><br>
</div>
<div><span>- Richard - Yes</span></div>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>
<span>I'd like to also thank&nbsp;</span><span>Thomas Trummer,&nbsp;</span><span>Rob Stewart and&nbsp;</span><span>Ion Gazta&ntilde;aga for their contribution to review.</span>
</div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div>The key suggestions from the review are listed below. None is critical enough to become a formal prerequisite, or&nbsp;</div>
<div>require a mini-review. The library can &nbsp;<span>be added when Antony feels its ready.</span>
</div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div><span>Naming</span></div>
<div><span>-----------</span></div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div><span>There was a concern that "DLL" might sound windows specific, and search for best terminology. This</span></div>
<div><span>does not seem all that important, as soon as documentation introduces the terminology it uses, and is consistent.</span></div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div><span>OSX support</span></div>
<div><span>-------------------</span></div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div><span>The library was found not to work on OSX; I believe this issue was already fixed off-list with help from Rodrigo.</span></div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div>Documentation</div>
<div>----------------------</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Several people requested improvements. Bjorn and John, in particular, pointed out specific issues. This seems to be the post important</div>
<div>change prior to adding the library.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Dependencies on Boost and system headers</div>
<div>----------------------------------------------------------------</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>It was suggested that the library does not depend on other Boost C++ Libraries. While it might be helpful to some users, I find it logically impossible for a Boost&nbsp;</div>
<div>formal review to request that d<span>ependencies on Boost libraries be removed.&nbsp;</span>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>It was also mentioned that Boost.DLL is header-only library and includes system headers that can bring a lot of symbols and maybe macros. I don't think an actual&nbsp;</div>
<div>problem was reported, though, and there is no way to avoid the problem while staying header-only.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>It's up to the author to consider these suggestions and do something, or don't do anything.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Continuous integration</div>
<div>--------------------------------</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>There was a recommendation from Niall to improve CI of the library, including static analysis, valgrind, Windows CI, showing CI status in documentation and so forth.</div>
<div>These are good suggestions. At the same time, they are not specific to Boost.DLL, and it's not the goal of&nbsp;<span>a formal review to create new generic development&nbsp;</span>
</div>
<div><span>process requirements. Many existing libraries of indisputably high quality do not have these requested mechanisms.</span></div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Therefore, the author can act on these suggestions as he sees fit.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Thanks,</div>
<div><br></div>-- <br><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr">Vladimir Prus<div><a href="http://vladimirprus.com/" target="_blank">http://vladimirprus.com</a></div>
</div></div>
</div>
_______________________________________________<br>Boost-users mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Boost-users <at> lists.boost.org">Boost-users <at> lists.boost.org</a><br>http://lists.boost.org/mailman/listinfo.cgi/boost-users</div>
Christophe Henry | 11 Jul 21:49 2015
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[boost] [review] Metaparse Review Result

Hi all,

First of all, the final result.
Metaparse is formally unconditionally accepted into Boost.

We had 11 reviews, all "Yes" votes. 2 "No" reviews based on formality were
later reversed to a "Yes".

The review was lively, with a general agreement that the library is very
useful, the design of high quality and the documentation great.
Here are some noticeable quotes which helped me take my decision:
- "thank you Abel for submitting such an amazing library.
The quality of the documentation and code is wonderful and
it has been a pleasure to review Metaparse." (Michael Caisse)
- (Design) "Of high quality. Based on the MPL paradigm, but I don't view
this as a problem." (Peter Dimov)
- "Part of the role of boost is to push compilers to the limit (and
sometimes beyond).
This library certainly has the capabilities to do so." (Roland Bock)

Worth noticing is the review of Gordon Woodhull. I myself wrote a new
front-end for MSM using Metaparse, and other use cases were very welcome
and Gordon managed to produce one for his compile-time graph library by the
end of the review, which I found impressive (for both the reviewer and the
library). Thank you for investing time in this review.

Another important factor for me for acceptance is how well the author is
going to maintain his library. We have too many abandoned libraries.
Abel went out of his way to oblige remarks and demands made by reviewers.
Long before the reviews he also had obliged my many critics and demands. He
also showed himself open for experiments. All this while keeping a very
calm and professional tone.
This is for me a very good sign of a library which will be well-maintained.

Finally, there were some repeated important comments which I see as
adressed to the rest of Boost that the library is targeted towards library
writers.
From Peter Dimov:
> - Are you knowledgeable about the problem domain?
"I'm not sure if anybody is. :-)"

It all depends on us, library and potential library writers to become
knowledgeable about this domain and make this library move from potentially
useful to very useful. We need to use it to write more cool libraries.
I notice a recurring theme where Boost would be dead or on the way to doom
etc etc.
Some very popular Boost libraries are now part of the Standard, and so
what? We need to make new ones.
Metaparse is one of them. Let's build more, using it!

Yes Reviews(11):

Andrzej Krzemienski

Bjorn Reese

Gordon Woodhull

Lee Clagett

Louis Dionne

Michael Caisse

Paul A. Bristow

Peter Dimov

Roland Bock

Edward Diener

Niall Douglas

I want to thank all the reviewers who invested their time in this review
and those who provided some usefuls comments.

I also want to thank Abel for presenting this great library.

Christophe Henry

Metaparse Review Manager

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Marshall Clow | 16 Jul 15:16 2015
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Boost release 1.59.0 beta 1 is now available from SourceForge


Boost release 1.59.0 beta 1 is now available from SourceForge
See http://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.59.0.beta.1/
For details of what's in the release, see http://www.boost.org/users/history/version_1_59_0.html
Note that the links to files on this web page are for the final release - use the SourceForge link above to get the beta files.
Please download the beta, give it a try, and report any problems you encounter.
Thanks,

-- The Boost Release Team

<div><div dir="ltr">
<br>Boost release 1.59.0 beta 1 is now available from SourceForge<br>See <a href="http://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.59.0.beta.1/">http://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.59.0.beta.1/</a><br>For details of what's in the release, see <a href="http://www.boost.org/users/history/version_1_59_0.html">http://www.boost.org/users/history/version_1_59_0.html</a>.&nbsp;<br>Note that the links to files on this web page are for the final release - use the SourceForge link above to get the beta files.<br>Please download the beta, give it a try, and report any problems you encounter.<br>Thanks,<br><br>-- The Boost Release Team<div><br></div>
</div></div>
Vladimir Prus | 3 Jul 15:50 2015
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[boost] Boost.DLL formal review is ongoing


The formal review of Boost.DLL library by Antony Polukhin is nearing the end of the first week.
As of today, over 100 people read through the library's tutorial, suggesting quite some interest.
However, no reviews were submitted yet. Please take the time to post your thoughts - even if you
don't have time to do a full review, or try the library, comments on design and interfaces are
still very valuable.

The summary of the library features and review checklists are reproduced below.

Boost.DLL is a C++98 library for comfortable work with DLL and DSO. Library
provides a portable across platforms way to:

  - load libraries at runtime
  - import and export any native functions and variables
  - make alias names for C++ mangled functions and symbols
  - query libraries/objects and executables for sections and exported
  symbols
  - self loading and self querying
  - getting program and module location by exported symbol

The documentation can be found at:

   http://apolukhin.github.io/Boost.DLL/index.html

and the source can be obtained at:

   https://github.com/apolukhin/Boost.DLL

Please post your reviews on the mailing list and if possible, answer the
following questions:

- Should the library be accepted?
- How useful is it?
- What's your evaluation of
 - Design
 - Implementation
 - Documentations
 - Tests
- How much effort did you put into your evaluation?
- Did you attempt to use the library? On what systems and compilers?

Thanks,
Volodya

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Glen Fernandes | 7 Jul 07:42 2015
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Boost.Hana

Dear Ron, Louis, and Boost developers,

The review period for Hana has concluded. 18 reviews were submitted:
- 17 votes for acceptance. (1 of these was conditional upon Hana
  wholly supporting a second C++ implementation however).
- 1 vote for rejection; for lack of compiler support.

I submit that Hana be accepted into Boost. I want to congratulate Louis:
the Boost community wants Hana to become an official Boost library.
Thank you again, Louis, for your work on Hana and for contributing it
to Boost.

I propose we require, prior to Hana's inclusion in a Boost release, only
that:
1. Hana's unit tests to be integrated into Boost's regression tests. If
   this requires maintaining both CMakeLists.txt and .b2 files, it is
   still worth it. I am willing to assist with this effort (and the
   invitation extends to anyone in the community to also contribute to
   the task). For release managers, potential Hana contributors, or just
   the general developer community in Boost, to see Hana's test cases in
   http://boost.org/development/tests/master/developer/summary.html will
   be useful.

I trust, but do not mandate before Hana is officially accepted into
Boost, that:
1. All GitHub issues pertaining to implementation and documentation that
   were opened by Louis in response to review feedback (or by others,
   such as Vincente, that were approved by Louis) will be addressed
   eventually (as long as they remain relevant).

I personally would ask for, but do not require for Hana's acceptance,
that:
1. That Hana's non-reference documentation live outside of the source
   code. The presentation of Hana's documentation is great; it looks
   modern, is easy to browse. I am not a fan of the prose living inside
   hana.hpp though (API reference documentation is the only exception).
2. Louis to investigate further the possibility of a Hana core library
   if such can be achieved with zero overhead (instead of focusing that
   effort onto a separate library that provides only a subset of Hana's
   functionality).

On the note of Hana's current support in existing C++ implementations:
- While Hana is wholly only supported by clang at present, gcc is not
  far behind. Given the trend of language conformance, it is reasonable
  to expect Hana will be entirely supported in a future gcc release.
- Hana targets the C++ standard (i.e. This isn't a case of targeting
  any compiler-vendor specific extensions) and any highly-contentious
  C++ language features within (e.g. This isn't something like a
  pre-C++11 library that uses 'export' that only builds with an EDG
  compiler).
- The community now has expressed sufficient interest in both kinds of
  libraries being part of Boost: Highly portable libraries that target
  implementation-specific features, and maintain compatibility with even
  legacy compilers; standard conforming, modern, libraries that are free
  of the maintenance debt of ancient compiler support.
- We need more libraries taking advantage of C++14 language features to
  drive vendor conformance. A standard may only be as potent as the
  C++ implementations that support support it, but when one (such as
  clang does) does, others will be more driven to follow suit when
  real (and highly desired) projects take advantage of it.

My thanks to everyone that participated in Hana's review with a
review (Edouard, John Fletcher, John Bytheway, Niall, Krzysztof, Manuel,
Roland, Christophe, David Stone, David Sankel, Lorenzo, John, Paul,
Zach, Kohei, Charley, Vincente, Abel) as well as discussion and bug
reports.

Best,
Glen
Glen Fernandes | 30 Jun 13:50 2015
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[Boost] [Hana] Formal review for Hana (Submissions closed)

Dear Boost community,

The period for Hana review submissions has ended. The result will be
announced on the list during this week.

I would like to thank everyone on this list for your submission of a review:
- Edouard Alligand
- John P. Fletcher
- Niall Douglas
- Krzysztof Jusiak
- Roland Bock
- Vicente J. Botet Escriba
- David Sankel
- Zach Laine
- Kohei Takahashi
- Charley Bay
- Bruno Dutra
- Christophe Henry
- David Stone
- Lorenzo Caminiti
- John Bytheway
- Manuel Sánchez

As well as the following people for your discussion during the review period:
- Phil Endecott
- Larry Evans
- Abel SInkovics
- Gavin Lambert
- Jeremy Maitin-Shepard
- Joel de Guzman
- Edward Diener
- Paul A. Bristow
- Peter Dimov
- Bjorn Reese
- Paul Fultz II
- Lee Clagett

Once again, thank you to Louis for all your work on Hana and
submitting it for Boost inclusion.

Glen
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Glen Fernandes | 10 Jun 11:19 2015
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[Boost] [Hana] Formal review for Hana

Dear Boost community,

The formal review of Louis Dionne's Hana library begins today,10th June
and ends on 24th June.

Hana is a header-only library for C++ metaprogramming that provides
facilities for computations on both types and values. It provides a
superset of the functionality provided by Boost.MPL and Boost.Fusion
but with more expressiveness, faster compilation times, and faster (or
equal) run times.

To dive right in to examples, please see the Quick start section of the
library's documentation:
http://ldionne.com/hana/index.html#tutorial-quickstart

Hana makes use of C++14 language features and thus requires a C++14
conforming compiler. It is recommended you evaluate it with clang 3.5 or
higher.

Hana's source code is available on Github:
https://github.com/ldionne/hana

Full documentation is also viewable on Github:
http://ldionne.github.io/hana

To read the documentation offline:
git clone http://github.com/ldionne/hana --branch=gh-pages doc/gh-pages

For a gentle introduction to Hana, please see:
1. C++Now 2015:
   http://ldionne.github.io/hana-cppnow-2015 (slides)
2. C++Con 2014:
   https://youtu.be/L2SktfaJPuU (video)
   http://ldionne.github.io/hana-cppcon-2014 (slides)

We encourage your participation in this review. At a minimum, kindly
state:
- Whether you believe the library should be accepted into Boost
  * Conditions for acceptance
- Your name
- Your knowledge of the problem domain.

You are strongly encouraged to also provide additional information:
- What is your evaluation of the library's:
  * Design
  * Implementation
  * Documentation
  * Tests
  * Usefulness
- Did you attempt to use the library? If so:
  * Which compiler(s)
  * What was the experience? Any problems?
- How much effort did you put into your evaluation of the review?

We await your feedback!

Best,
Glen

Gmane