Kim Rose | 1 Dec 17:54 2011

Fwd: [CIBSE 2012] Call for Submissions - Doctoral Symposium


DOCTORAL SYMPOSIUM CIBSE 2012 (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

The Organizing Committee of the XIVIbero-American Conference on Software Engineering (CIbSE 2012) are pleased to invite PhD students in the Software Engineering and related areas to participate actively in the Doctoral Symposium CIbSE 2012 by submitting papers describing their doctoral work.

The CIbSE 2012 Doctoral Symposium is an international forum for PhD students to discuss their research goals, methodology, and early results, in a critical but supportive and constructive environment. It will be performed in a one-day session. Selected students will present their work and receive constructive feedback both from a panel of experts and from other Doctoral Symposium students. The students will also have the opportunity to seek advice on various aspects of completing a Ph.D. and performing research in Software Engineering. 

Format of the Submissions
====================
The PhD students interested in participating in the Doctoral Symposium should take into account the following items to submit their works.
Provide a clear description of the research problem being addressed. 
Motivate the proposed research (i.e. state why the research work is being conducted, and what benefits the research will bring). 
Outline the current knowledge of the problem domain, briefly describe what existing work the research builds upon (citing key papers), and also briefly describe any existing solutions that have been developed or are currently being developed (citing key papers). 
Clearly present preliminary results from the research work, and propose a plan of research for completing the PhD. 
Point out the contributions of the applicant to the solution of the problem, and state in what aspects the suggested solution is different, new or better as compared to existing approaches to the problem. 

Submitted papers must not exceed 6 pages in Springer LNCS format (http://www.springer.de/comp/lncs/authors.html). Papers may be written in English, Spanish or Portuguese. 

What and how to Submit 
==================
Papers must be sent in PDF format to Gabriela Arévalo (gabriela.b.arevalo-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org) by December 20th, 2011. In addition, you must also attach an “expectation and benefits” statement (1 page maximum, in PDF format) describing the kind of advice you would like to receive and how this would help you in your research. You should seek your supervisor’s guidance when preparing this statement. So, each submission must consist of the following files: 
Attached PDF with your research paper submission (maximum 6 pages) 
Attached PDF with your expectation and benefits statement (maximum 1 page) 

Please state [CIbSE 2012] Doctoral Symposium- Submission <Last name of the PhD student> as the subject of the e-mail. The body of the email should also contain: Title, abstract (200 words), keywords, and student and advisor (name, e-mail address, affiliation and postal address). 

Evaluation of Submissions
====================
Submitted papers will be subject to a review process by an international Program Committee. The selected submissions will be published as part of the proceedings of the CIbSE 2012 Conference. 

Chair
====
Gabriela Arévalo (Universidad Nacional de Quilmes)

Program Committee
===============

<div>
<div><span class="Apple-style-span"><div class="im">
<div><br></div>
<div>DOCTORAL SYMPOSIUM CIBSE 2012&nbsp;(Buenos Aires, Argentina)</div>
<div><a href="http://cibse2012.unlam.edu.ar/program/d_symp.php" target="_blank">http://cibse2012.unlam.edu.ar/program/d_symp.php</a></div>
<div><br></div>
<div>CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>The Organizing Committee of the XIVIbero-American Conference on Software Engineering (CIbSE 2012) are pleased to invite PhD students in the Software Engineering and related areas to participate actively in the Doctoral Symposium CIbSE 2012 by submitting papers describing their doctoral work.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>The CIbSE 2012 Doctoral Symposium is an international forum for PhD students to discuss their research goals, methodology, and early results, in a critical but supportive and constructive environment. It&nbsp;will be performed in a one-day session. Selected students will present their work and receive constructive feedback both from a panel of experts and from other Doctoral Symposium students. The students will also have the opportunity to seek advice on various aspects of completing a Ph.D. and performing research in Software Engineering.&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Format of the Submissions</div>
<div>====================</div>
<div>The PhD students interested in participating in the Doctoral Symposium should take into account the following items to submit their works.</div>
<div>&bull;<span>	</span>Provide a clear description of the research problem being addressed.&nbsp;</div>
<div>&bull;<span>	</span>Motivate the proposed research (i.e. state why the research work is being conducted, and what benefits the research will bring).&nbsp;</div>
<div>&bull;<span>	</span>Outline the current knowledge of the problem domain, briefly describe what existing work the research builds upon (citing key papers), and also briefly describe any existing solutions that have been developed or are currently being developed (citing key papers).&nbsp;</div>
<div>&bull;<span>	</span>Clearly present preliminary results from the research work, and propose a plan of research for completing the PhD.&nbsp;</div>
<div>&bull;<span>	</span>Point out the contributions of the applicant to the solution of the problem, and state in what aspects the suggested solution is different, new or better as compared to existing approaches to the problem.&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Submitted papers must not exceed 6 pages in Springer LNCS format (<a href="http://www.springer.de/comp/lncs/authors.html" target="_blank">http://www.springer.de/comp/lncs/authors.html</a>). Papers may be written in English, Spanish or Portuguese.&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>What and how to Submit&nbsp;</div>
<div>==================</div>
<div>Papers must be sent in PDF format to Gabriela Ar&eacute;valo (<a href="mailto:gabriela.b.arevalo@..." target="_blank">gabriela.b.arevalo@...</a>) by December 20th, 2011. In addition, you must also attach an &ldquo;expectation and benefits&rdquo; statement (1 page maximum, in PDF format) describing the kind of advice you would like to receive and how this would help you in your research. You should seek your supervisor&rsquo;s guidance when preparing this statement. So, each submission must consist of the following files:&nbsp;</div>
<div>&bull;<span>	</span>Attached PDF with your research paper submission (maximum 6 pages)&nbsp;</div>
<div>&bull;<span>	</span>Attached PDF with your expectation and benefits statement (maximum 1 page)&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Please state [CIbSE 2012] Doctoral Symposium- Submission &lt;Last name of the PhD student&gt; as the subject of the e-mail. The body of the email should also contain: Title, abstract (200 words), keywords, and student and advisor (name, e-mail address, affiliation and postal address).&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Evaluation of Submissions</div>
<div>====================</div>
<div>Submitted papers will be subject to a review process by an international Program Committee.&nbsp;The selected submissions will be published as part of the proceedings of the CIbSE 2012 Conference.&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
</div>
<div>Chair</div>
<div>====</div>
<div>Gabriela Ar&eacute;valo (Universidad Nacional de Quilmes)</div>
<div>Contact:&nbsp;<a href="mailto:gabriela.b.arevalo@..." target="_blank">gabriela.b.arevalo@...</a>
</div>
<div class="im">
<div><br></div>
<div>Program Committee</div>
<div>===============</div>
</div></span></div>
<br>
</div>
Yoshiki Ohshima | 1 Dec 20:11 2011

Re: VPRI Presentations (e.g. C5 2012)

At Mon, 28 Nov 2011 11:16:50 -0500,
DeNigris Sean wrote:
> 
> Will you notify the list when VPRI presentations are scheduled? For example, is anyone planning on
presenting at C5 2012?
> 
> It would effect my conference selection through the year because STEPS seems like the most important work
in software right now.

  As Kim said, none of VPRI people ended up submitting a paper.  But
many of us will be there and happy to show whatever we've got (by that
time, hehe).

-- Yoshiki

DeNigris Sean | 4 Dec 04:40 2011

Re: VPRI Presentations (e.g. C5 2012)

On Dec 1, 2011, at 2:11 PM, Yoshiki Ohshima wrote:
> many of us will be there and happy to show whatever we've got (by that
> time, hehe).

Fantastic! I look forward to it.

David Girle | 5 Dec 19:45 2011
Picon

Update to Maru?

Was there any update to Maru that would allow the FFT code out of the
Appendix II of tr2011004_steps.pdf to run?
Using Maru from the main repository or embedded in Nile, both failed for me.

Thanks,

David

Mónica Pinto | 9 Dec 15:12 2011
Picon

AOSD 2012 Student Volunteer program


*** AOSD 2012 ***

March 25-30, 2012
Hasso-Plattner-Institut Potsdam, Germany
http://aosd.net/2012/

Call for STUDENT VOLUNTEER PROGRAM at "MODULARITY: AOSD 2012" 

The Student Volunteer program is a great opportunity for students interested
in topics of advanced modularity and Aspect-Oriented Software Development
(AOSD) to stay tuned on the cutting edge scientific and technical advances
in this area. This is also an opportunity for the interested grad and
undergrad students to engage with their peers: both students and senior
researchers and practitioners. As ever, the AOSD 2012 Student Volunteer
program will strive to provide an active and interactive environment for the
students to benefit from the research program of the conference, as well as
to develop their professional network and enjoy the social events.

Special Call for Students From European Universities
* The AOSD 2012 Student Volunteer program will provide 10 dedicated spots
for graduate students from European universities
* The applications will be prioritized based on the relevance of the student
work to AOSD, the potential extension of the AOSD community via integration
of related work from new/underrepresented research groups, and the
circumstances of individual students.

The student volunteers will receive:
* Free student registration for the conference.
* Free participation in all social events including one banquet ticket.
* Excellent networking opportunities: both working as a team with other
volunteers, and interacting with other conference participants.
* The program chairs will strive to (as much as possible) ensure that the
volunteers are assigned to the tutorials, workshops, demonstrations or other
events of their interest.
* When not on duty, volunteers will have free admission to all conference
events, provided space is available.

The student volunteers will provide 15-20 hours of work on conference
support tasks throughout the duration of the conference, including:
* Technical assistance for the main conference sessions, workshops,
tutorials, demonstrations, or evening events.
* Help at conference bag packing and signposting.
* Help at the registration desk.
* Help in arranging, rearranging and disassembling conference  facilities.
* Technical assistance to speakers and conference participants.

The applicants for student volunteer positions must be:
* Enrolled as a full-time student during the 2011-2012 academic year.
* Willing to be friendly (no natural outgoing personality required, just a
strong desire to do a good job).
* Proficient in English.
* Proficiency in other languages is an advantage.

How to Apply
Please send your application in English by email to the Student Volunteers
Chairs at [student-volunteers at aosd.net]. The Student Volunteers Chairs
will confirm receipt of the submission. An application should include:
* A short motivation Letter;
* A CV
* Contact name, phone number, and email address of a faculty member at your
institution who will recommend you as a student volunteer (Supervisors might
be contacted to confirm the appropriateness of the
candidates.)
* The dates and times of your arrival and departure

In the event that one’s student volunteer application is not accepted, you
may still register using the early registration rate. Please contact
registration at aosd.net.
If you have further questions please contact the Student Volunteers Chairs
(Ruzanna Chitchyan or Jens Lincke) at volunteers at aosd.net.

Mónica Pinto | 9 Dec 15:52 2011
Picon

Last Call for Demonstrations at AOSD 2012

---------------------------------------------------
Last Call for Demonstrations at AOSD 2012
---------------------------------------------------

MODULARITY: aosd.2012, March 25-30, 2012
Hasso-Plattner-Institut Potsdam, Germany
http://aosd.net/2012/

Important Dates
---------------
Demonstration proposals due: Monday, January 9th, 2012
Notification: Monday, January 30th, 2012

Overview
--------
Demonstrations serve to disseminate advances embodied in
research-oriented tools and systems that use or support AOSD.
Attendees learn about emerging technologies and have opportunities to
interact with their developers. Presenters gain excellent
opportunities to increase the visibility and impact of their work.
AOSD.12 solicits high quality proposals for its demonstration track.
Demonstrations can range across commercial, academic, and corporate
research systems.

Demonstrations will be selected on the basis of technical merit,
novelty, relevance to the AOSD community, and feasibility of
presentation. The presentation should be focused on technical content
and given by the technical members of the team.

There are two types of demonstrations: Forum demos and Tabletop demos.
The intent is to split demos into those that can be shown without a
formal presentation and those that require one.

In Tabletop demos, the presenter is seated at a table, and is
surrounded by a number of chairs for attendants. There is no
conceptual introduction, instead the demonstration starts with showing
the tool itself. This form of demonstration is especially suited for
extensions to tools which are well known, as no introduction is
needed, or for demos where more interaction with the audience is
expected, as the setting is more intimate. Tabletop demos are
allocated 30 minutes, with 20 minutes for the demonstration and 10
minutes for questions and discussion. Authors of regular research
papers are also welcome to submit accompanying demonstrations.

Forum demos start with a conceptual introduction of about 10 minutes
before the tool itself is demonstrated. This form of demos is suited
for tools which are not well-known or new, or have been significantly
extended in recent times. A Forum demo is allocated 45 minutes, with
10 minutes for a presentation, 25 minutes for the demonstration and 10
minutes for questions and discussion. Every demonstration will be
scheduled twice for presentation. Also, demonstration presenters will
have the opportunity to give a 1-minute overview of their
demonstration during a conference plenary session.

There will also be space set aside where any conference attendee can
give an informal demonstration. Demonstrations included in the program
are also allowed and encouraged to be presented informally.

Topics of Interest
------------------
Topics of interest include (though are not limited to):
* support for application of the aspect-oriented paradigm throughout
the development life-cycle,
* new technologies for aspect weaving/compilation,
* reverse engineering of aspects from existing software artifacts,
* reusable library aspects,
* interesting applications of AOSD

Submission Guidelines
---------------------
The following information is required for a demonstration/exhibition
submission:

* Demonstration title
* Type of demonstration (Forum or Tabletop)
* Name, email, address, and phone number of the contact person
* Names and affiliations of the other presenters
* A short bio of all presenters
* Description including:
 - Problems addressed
 - Relevance to AOSD
 - Uniqueness of design and implementation
 - Underlying implementation techniques and technologies used
 - Relation to other industrial or research efforts
 - A description with screenshots (or optionally a movie) of what
the audience will see
A 200 word abstract for advertising the demonstration/exhibition on
the conference web site
Hardware and presentation requirements

Proposals for demonstrations/exhibitions should not exceed four pages
(excluding the screenshots) in either ASCII (plain or HTML) or Adobe
Portable Document Format (PDF).

How to Submit
-------------
Proposals should be submitted by email to the Demonstrations Chairs
(Carl Friedrich Bolz and Damien Cassou,) at demos at aosd.net. The
Demonstration Chairs will confirm receipt of the submission.

Kim Rose | 9 Dec 21:22 2011

Fwd: C5-12: invitation for panel, workshop, and tutorial proposals


The organizing committee of C5 2012 welcomes proposals for panel,  
workshop and
tutorial sessions relevant to the topics of the conference.

Workshops facilitate an active and constructive exchange on a topic of  
interest.
The organizer should be prepared to motivate and lead the session while
encouraging discussion and interaction between all participants.

A panel brings together several experts or notable members of the  
community to
make short presentations or position statements for the participants.   
The
organizer should be prepared to enlist panelists in advance, moderate  
the
session, facilitate lively discussion between the panelists, and lead  
a Q&A
and/or general discussion period at the end of the session.

A tutorial should cover a single topic in detail.  The tutorial can  
address
research work of general interest and accessibility, or a pragmatic  
subject that
is likely to be useful to many of the participants but familiar to few.

Proposals should include:

* The title, goals and duration of the proposed session (90 minutes  
would be
typical);
* The specific topics that will be addressed;
* For panel proposals only: a preliminary list of prospective  
panelists and a
few reasons why you believe the topic will generate interest and  
discussion for
C5 attendees.

Being a relatively small conference, organizers of these sessions  
should assume
that all attendees of the conference will be present at their session.

Please submit proposals by e-mail to c512@... before January  
4, 2012.

Kim Rose | 13 Dec 21:02 2011

History of computing talks at SJSU

For those of you looking to hear more from Alan Kay -- you'll find a  
talk from him and several other "big names in computer science" here  
-- thanks to San Jose State University.

  http://www.sjsu.edu/atn/services/webcasting/archives/fall_2011/hist/computing.html

  -- Kim

Casey Ransberger | 14 Dec 08:17 2011
Picon

Debugging PEGs and Packrats

I know this has come up before. Hopefully I'm not about to repeat a lot. 

Debugging this stuff just seems really hard. And significantly harder than what I've experienced working
with e.g. Yacc. 

Hypothesis: Yacc had a lot of time to bake before I ever found it. PEGs are new, so there's been less overall
experience with debugging them. 

I've experimented in what little time I can devote with OMeta, PetitParser, and Treetop. The debugging
experience has been roughly consistent across all three. 

One particular issue which has bugged me: memoization seems to carry a lot of instance-state that's really
hard to comprehend when the grammar isn't working as I expect. It's just really hard to use that ocean of
information to figure out what I've done wrong. 

Given that with these new parsing technologies, we're pretty lucky to see "parse error" as an error
message, I can't help but think that it's worth studying debugging strategies. Heh. :D I'm really not
complaining, I'm just pointing it out. 

Has anyone here found any technique(s) which makes debugging a grammar written for a PEG/packrat less of a
pain in the butt?

I'd be really interested in hearing about it. 

Wesley Smith | 14 Dec 08:26 2011
Picon

Re: Debugging PEGs and Packrats

I use LPEG ( http://www.inf.puc-rio.br/~roberto/lpeg/ ) a lot for
writing grammars.  I'm not familiar with the ones you mention so I
have no idea how similar they are.  I too had a lot of trouble
debugging, so I ended up writing some tools that print out debugging
statements in a human readable form.  The ones I've found most useful
are listing out the matched tokens in order, the tokens attempted, and
a trace of the grammar rules the parser follows.  For reference, this
is a typical log of data I get (this one is for a Lua grammar):

1 1 -> block
1  2 -> chunk
1   3 -> stat
1    4 -> varlist
1     5 -> var
1      6 -> prefix
1     5 <-: prefix
1    4 <-: var
1   3 <-: varlist
1    4 -> functioncall
1     5 -> prefix
1    4 <-: prefix
1   3 <-: functioncall
2    4 -> funcname
2   3 <- funcname 3 MATCH
3    4 -> funcbody
4     5 -> parlist
4      6 -> namelist
8     5 <- namelist 9 MATCH
8    4 <- parlist 9 MATCH
10     5 -> block
10      6 -> chunk
10       7 -> stat
10        8 -> varlist
10         9 -> var
10          10 -> prefix
10         9 <- prefix 10 MATCH
11          10 -> suffix
11           11 -> call
11            12 -> args
11             13 -> tableconstructor
11            12 <-: tableconstructor
11           11 <-: args
11          10 <-: call
11           11 -> index
11          10 <-: index
11         9 <-: suffix
11          10 -> index
11         9 <-: index
10        8 <- var 11 MATCH
10       7 <- varlist 11 MATCH
10        8 -> functioncall
10         9 -> prefix
10        8 <- prefix 11 MATCH
11         9 -> suffix
11          10 -> call
11           11 -> args
11            12 -> tableconstructor
11           11 <-: tableconstructor
11          10 <-: args
11         9 <-: call
11          10 -> index
11         9 <-: index
11        8 <-: suffix
11         9 -> call
11          10 -> args
11           11 -> tableconstructor
11          10 <-: tableconstructor
11         9 <-: args
11        8 <-: call
10       7 <-: functioncall
10      6 <-: stat
10       7 -> laststat
10      6 <-: laststat
9     5 <- chunk 11 MATCH
9    4 <- block 11 MATCH
3   3 <-: funcbody
1  2 <-: stat
1   3 -> laststat
1  2 <-: laststat
0 1 <- chunk 11 MATCH
00 <- block 11 MATCH
********************************
Rule Stack:
{
  idx = 9,
  [1] = "block",
  [2] = "chunk",
  [3] = "stat",
  [4] = "funcbody",
  [5] = "block",
  [6] = "chunk",
  [7] = "stat",
  [8] = "functioncall",
  [9] = "prefix",
}
********************************
Attempted Tokens List:
{
  rules = {
    [1] = "args",
    [2] = "tableconstructor",
    [3] = "args",
    [4] = "call",
    [5] = "index",
    [6] = "index",
    [7] = "varlist",
    [8] = "stat",
  },
  tokens = {
    [1] = "LEFT_PAREN",
    [2] = "LEFT_BRACE",
    [3] = "STRING",
    [4] = "COLON",
    [5] = "LEFT_BRACKET",
    [6] = "DOT",
    [7] = "COMMA",
    [8] = "EQUALS",
  },
}


Gmane