Dale Schumacher | 7 Dec 01:21 2010
Picon

Evaluating Expressions, part 7 – Transactions and Exceptions

I just posted the final piece of the meta-circular Humus evaluator.
"Evaluating Expressions, part 7 – Transactions and Exceptions"
(http://bit.ly/fl6Z3O)

Throughout the series, I've had the opportunity to present a wide
variety of powerful language constructs.  Of course, concurrent
evaluation/execution has been an ongoing theme.  Pattern matching as
part of the resolution of equations is one of my favorites.
Single-assignment data-flow variables played an important role in
automatic resolution of data dependencies.  The lambda-abstraction
mechanism is applied universally to support parameterization of not
only expressions, but statement blocks too.  I hope this series can
serve as an interesting and informative reference.

============================================================
FRIAM Applied Complexity Group listserv
Meets Fridays 9a-11:30 at cafe at St. John's College
lectures, archives, unsubscribe, maps at http://www.friam.org

Kim Rose | 9 Dec 02:16 2010

Join Us at C5-2011 in Kyoto, Japan

Dear friends & colleagues -

Registration for C5-11 - January 18-20, 2011 in Kyoto Japan is now open!

Please join us for 3 days of excellent programs including keynote  
talks from Dr. Ken Perlin,  New York University & Mr. Junkyo Fujieda,  
ReGIS, Inc.

See http://www.cm.is.ritsumei.ac.jp/c5-11/ for program details and  
registration info.

Please share this announcement with colleagues and friends.  We hope  
to see you in Kyoto in January!

Kim Rose
Viewpoints Research Institute

Casey Ransberger | 14 Dec 05:08 2010
Picon

Reg. Frank

I finally got around to checking the writings page again. I know October was a bit ago, but I just saw the STEPS report. Looks like there's been a lot of progress! Any chance we'll see Frank walking around? Or maybe on YouTube? I have extra torches if anyone needs them:)


--
Casey Ransberger
<div>
<p>I finally got around to checking the writings page again. I know October was a bit ago, but I just saw the STEPS report. Looks like there's been a lot of progress!&nbsp;Any chance we'll see Frank walking around? Or maybe on YouTube? I have extra torches if anyone needs them:)</p>
<div>
<br>-- <br>Casey Ransberger<br>
</div>
</div>
Alan Kay | 14 Dec 05:29 2010
Picon

Re: Reg. Frank

Hi Casey,

We still have a lot of work to do before we have a kernel of stuff that we'll be happy to answer questions about. Frank is still in intensive care, but we are working to get him off his respirator and heart machine!

Cheers,

Alan

From: Casey Ransberger <casey.obrien.r-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org>
To: Fu ndamentals of New Computing <fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Mon, December 13, 2010 8:08:05 PM
Subject: [fonc] Reg. Frank

I finally got around to checking the writings page again. I know October was a bit ago, but I just saw the STEPS report. Looks like there's been a lot of progress! Any chance we'll see Frank walking around? Or maybe on YouTube? I have extra torches if anyone needs them:)

--
Casey Ransberger

<div>
<div>
<div>Hi Casey,<br><br>We still have a lot of work to do before we have a kernel of stuff that we'll be happy to answer questions about. Frank is still in intensive care, but we are working to get him off his respirator and heart machine!<br><br>Cheers,<br><br>Alan<br>
</div>
<div>
<br><div>
<span>From:</span> Casey Ransberger &lt;casey.obrien.r@...&gt;<br><span>To:</span> Fu
 ndamentals of New Computing &lt;fonc@...&gt;<br><span>Sent:</span> Mon, December 13, 2010 8:08:05 PM<br><span>Subject:</span> [fonc] Reg. Frank<br><br>
I finally got around to checking the writings page again. I know October was a bit ago, but I just saw the STEPS report. Looks like there's been a lot of progress!&nbsp;Any chance we'll see Frank walking around? Or maybe on YouTube? I have extra torches if anyone needs them:)<div>
<br>-- <br>Casey Ransberger<br>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<br>
</div>
Carl Gundel | 15 Dec 23:07 2010

RE: Reg. Frank

Vive le monstre!

 

From: fonc-bounces-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org [mailto:fonc-bounces-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org] On Behalf Of Alan Kay
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 11:29 PM
To: Fundamentals of New Computing
Subject: Re: [fonc] Reg. Frank

 

Hi Casey,

We still have a lot of work to do before we have a kernel of stuff that we'll be happy to answer questions about. Frank is still in intensive care, but we are working to get him off his respirator and heart machine!

Cheers,

Alan

 

From: Casey Ransberger <casey.obrien.r-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org>
To: Fundamentals of New Computing <fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Mon, December 13, 2010 8:08:05 PM
Subject: [fonc] Reg. Frank

I finally got around to checking the writings page again. I know October was a bit ago, but I just saw the STEPS report. Looks like there's been a lot of progress! Any chance we'll see Frank walking around? Or maybe on YouTube? I have extra torches if anyone needs them:)


--
Casey Ransberger

 

<div><div class="WordSection1">
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>Vive le monstre!<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<div><div><p class="MsoNormal"><span>From:</span><span> fonc-bounces@... [mailto:fonc-bounces@...] On Behalf Of Alan Kay<br>Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 11:29 PM<br>To: Fundamentals of New Computing<br>Subject: Re: [fonc] Reg. Frank<p></p></span></p></div></div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><p>&nbsp;</p></p>
<div>
<div><p class="MsoNormal">Hi Casey,<br><br>We still have a lot of work to do before we have a kernel of stuff that we'll be happy to answer questions about. Frank is still in intensive care, but we are working to get him off his respirator and heart machine!<br><br>Cheers,<br><br>Alan<p></p></p></div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><p>&nbsp;</p></p>
<div>
<div class="MsoNormal" align="center"><span></span></div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>From:</span><span> Casey Ransberger &lt;casey.obrien.r@...&gt;<br>To: Fundamentals of New Computing &lt;fonc@...&gt;<br>Sent: Mon, December 13, 2010 8:08:05 PM<br>Subject: [fonc] Reg. Frank<br></span><br>I finally got around to checking the writings page again. I know October was a bit ago, but I just saw the STEPS report. Looks like there's been a lot of progress!&nbsp;Any chance we'll see Frank walking around? Or maybe on YouTube? I have extra torches if anyone needs them:)<p></p></p>
<div><p class="MsoNormal"><br>-- <br>Casey Ransberger<p></p></p></div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><p>&nbsp;</p></p>
</div></div>
Cornelius Toole | 16 Dec 07:56 2010
Picon

Re: Reg. Frank

I was happy to see the report too. I look forward to checking Frank out. I won't be able resist attempting my best Igor impersonation the first times it builds and runs on my machine.


-Cornelius

On Wed, Dec 15, 2010 at 4:07 PM, Carl Gundel <carlg <at> psychesystems.com> wrote:

Vive le monstre!

 

From: fonc-bounces-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org [mailto:fonc-bounces-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org] On Behalf Of Alan Kay
Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 11:29 PM


To: Fundamentals of New Computing
Subject: Re: [fonc] Reg. Frank

 

Hi Casey,

We still have a lot of work to do before we have a kernel of stuff that we'll be happy to answer questions about. Frank is still in intensive care, but we are working to get him off his respirator and heart machine!

Cheers,

Alan

 

From: Casey Ransberger <casey.obrien.r-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org>
To: Fundamentals of New Computing <fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org>
Sent: Mon, December 13, 2010 8:08:05 PM
Subject: [fonc] Reg. Frank

I finally got around to checking the writings page again. I know October was a bit ago, but I just saw the STEPS report. Looks like there's been a lot of progress! Any chance we'll see Frank walking around? Or maybe on YouTube? I have extra torches if anyone needs them:)


--
Casey Ransberger

 


_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc




--
cornelius toole, jr. | ctoole1-2Kj9MtL5PLMeF4Ui59n7hQ@public.gmane.org | mobile: 601.212.3045
<div>
<p>I was happy to see the report too. I look forward to checking Frank out. I won't be able resist attempting my best Igor impersonation the first times it builds and runs on my machine.</p>
<div><br></div>
<div>-Cornelius<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Dec 15, 2010 at 4:07 PM, Carl Gundel <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:carlg@...">carlg <at> psychesystems.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">

<div lang="EN-US" link="blue" vlink="purple"><div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>Vive le monstre!</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>&nbsp;</span></p>

<div><div>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>From:</span><span> <a href="mailto:fonc-bounces@..." target="_blank">fonc-bounces@...</a> [mailto:<a href="mailto:fonc-bounces@..." target="_blank">fonc-bounces@...</a>] On Behalf Of Alan Kay<br>Sent: Monday, December 13, 2010 11:29 PM</span></p>
<div class="im">
<br>To: Fundamentals of New Computing<br>
</div>Subject: Re: [fonc] Reg. Frank<p></p>
</div></div>
<div>
<div></div>
<div class="h5">
<p class="MsoNormal">

&nbsp;</p>
<div>
<div><p class="MsoNormal">Hi Casey,<br><br>We still have a lot of work to do before we have a kernel of stuff that we'll be happy to answer questions about. Frank is still in intensive care, but we are working to get him off his respirator and heart machine!<br><br>Cheers,<br><br>Alan</p></div>
<div>
<p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p>
<div>
<div class="MsoNormal" align="center"><span></span></div>
<p class="MsoNormal">

<span>From:</span><span> Casey Ransberger &lt;<a href="mailto:casey.obrien.r@..." target="_blank">casey.obrien.r@...</a>&gt;<br>To: Fundamentals of New Computing &lt;<a href="mailto:fonc@..." target="_blank">fonc@...</a>&gt;<br>Sent: Mon, December 13, 2010 8:08:05 PM<br>Subject: [fonc] Reg. Frank<br></span><br>I finally got around to checking the writings page again. I know October was a bit ago, but I just saw the STEPS report. Looks like there's been a lot of progress!&nbsp;Any chance we'll see Frank walking around? Or maybe on YouTube? I have extra torches if anyone needs them:)</p>

<div><p class="MsoNormal"><br>-- <br>Casey Ransberger</p></div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
<p class="MsoNormal">&nbsp;</p>
</div>
</div>
</div></div>
<br>_______________________________________________<br>
fonc mailing list<br><a href="mailto:fonc@...">fonc@...</a><br><a href="http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc" target="_blank">http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc</a><br><br>
</blockquote>
</div>
<br><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>cornelius toole, jr. | <a href="mailto:ctoole1@...">ctoole1@...</a> | mobile: 601.212.3045 <br>
</div>
</div>
Reuben Thomas | 17 Dec 13:45 2010

Show Us The Code!

I started reading with interest the October 2010 STEPS Progress
Report, then as soon as I got to the first screenshot, was overcome by
a familiar feeling of depression: I strongly suspected, and quickly
confirmed, that there was no code I could try.

We've been over this ground in the past, and have seen two related
arguments for not following the dictum "release early, release often":

1. "It's not ready".

2. "We don't have time to support people trying to build non-production code."

To which the answers are, respectively:

i. You don't understand "release early, release often".

ii. You don't understand "release early, release often".

Subscribers to this list do not, on the whole, care if code coming out
of VPRI is buggy, non-portable, pre-alpha, or will only run correctly
at a certain phase of the moon. We will quite happily help each other
build and play with it. We understand that you have better things to
do than support it, and also that in a few months time you may have
thrown it all away and started again.

I, personally, often don't even try building such code; I just want to
know that other people can!

You still seem to be stuck in the mentality of wanting to produce a
finished product. But in computing we all know there is no such thing.
Releasing unfinished, half-baked code will NOT turn people off. In
fact, the effect is exactly the opposite: a huge marketing WIN!

If you still doubt me, just look at the number of questions about
building Ian Piumarta's idst repo, which has only seen one, trivial,
commit this year.

Releasing a technical report on software without code is like
publishing a review of a new piece of music but not the score: it's
tantalizing, but essentially useless. By waiting until you think you
have something worth releasing, you are losing years—YEARS!—of free
marketing and buzz. And you need it! Competitors doing merely
evolutionarily cool stuff will consign your entire project to the
dustbin of history, if you don't get people excited about what you're
doing, and if we're lucky, someone else will pick up the ideas in a
few decades when they have dwindled to a mere stepwise advance, just
before they become actually redundant.

The history of computing is littered with just such lost
opportunities; please don't become yet another.

--

-- 
http://rrt.sc3d.org

Oleksandr Nikitin | 17 Dec 14:13 2010
Picon

Re: Show Us The Code!

?Can't agree more with Thomas.

For most of the programmers out there, the best way to 'get in touch' with 
the project is to see the actual guts;
leave the shiny presentations for sponsors and marketing people ;-)

For example, the OMeta release was hugely successful - I find more and more 
applications of it, in completely
different projects from different areas of computing, while other parts of 
FoNC remain only barely known, if at all,
to people outside of this mailing list.

-- Oleksandr Nikitin

-----Original Message----- 
From: Reuben Thomas
Sent: Friday, December 17, 2010 2:45 PM
To: Fundamentals of New Computing
Subject: [fonc] Show Us The Code!

I started reading with interest the October 2010 STEPS Progress
Report, then as soon as I got to the first screenshot, was overcome by
a familiar feeling of depression: I strongly suspected, and quickly
confirmed, that there was no code I could try.

We've been over this ground in the past, and have seen two related
arguments for not following the dictum "release early, release often":

1. "It's not ready".

2. "We don't have time to support people trying to build non-production 
code."

To which the answers are, respectively:

i. You don't understand "release early, release often".

ii. You don't understand "release early, release often".

Subscribers to this list do not, on the whole, care if code coming out
of VPRI is buggy, non-portable, pre-alpha, or will only run correctly
at a certain phase of the moon. We will quite happily help each other
build and play with it. We understand that you have better things to
do than support it, and also that in a few months time you may have
thrown it all away and started again.

I, personally, often don't even try building such code; I just want to
know that other people can!

You still seem to be stuck in the mentality of wanting to produce a
finished product. But in computing we all know there is no such thing.
Releasing unfinished, half-baked code will NOT turn people off. In
fact, the effect is exactly the opposite: a huge marketing WIN!

If you still doubt me, just look at the number of questions about
building Ian Piumarta's idst repo, which has only seen one, trivial,
commit this year.

Releasing a technical report on software without code is like
publishing a review of a new piece of music but not the score: it's
tantalizing, but essentially useless. By waiting until you think you
have something worth releasing, you are losing years—YEARS!—of free
marketing and buzz. And you need it! Competitors doing merely
evolutionarily cool stuff will consign your entire project to the
dustbin of history, if you don't get people excited about what you're
doing, and if we're lucky, someone else will pick up the ideas in a
few decades when they have dwindled to a mere stepwise advance, just
before they become actually redundant.

The history of computing is littered with just such lost
opportunities; please don't become yet another.

--

-- 
http://rrt.sc3d.org

_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc@...
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc 

Ken Ritchie | 17 Dec 17:53 2010
Picon

Re: Show Us The Code!

http://www.20thingsilearned.com/open-source/1

Cheers,
--Ken Ritchie (Atlanta)
;-)

On Fri, Dec 17, 2010 at 8:13 AM, Oleksandr Nikitin <wizzard0-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org> wrote:
?Can't agree more with Thomas.

For most of the programmers out there, the best way to 'get in touch' with the project is to see the actual guts;
leave the shiny presentations for sponsors and marketing people ;-)

For example, the OMeta release was hugely successful - I find more and more applications of it, in completely
different projects from different areas of computing, while other parts of FoNC remain only barely known, if at all,
to people outside of this mailing list.

-- Oleksandr Nikitin

-----Original Message----- From: Reuben Thomas
Sent: Friday, December 17, 2010 2:45 PM
To: Fundamentals of New Computing
Subject: [fonc] Show Us The Code!


I started reading with interest the October 2010 STEPS Progress
Report, then as soon as I got to the first screenshot, was overcome by
a familiar feeling of depression: I strongly suspected, and quickly
confirmed, that there was no code I could try.

We've been over this ground in the past, and have seen two related
arguments for not following the dictum "release early, release often":

1. "It's not ready".

2. "We don't have time to support people trying to build non-production code."

To which the answers are, respectively:

i. You don't understand "release early, release often".

ii. You don't understand "release early, release often".

Subscribers to this list do not, on the whole, care if code coming out
of VPRI is buggy, non-portable, pre-alpha, or will only run correctly
at a certain phase of the moon. We will quite happily help each other
build and play with it. We understand that you have better things to
do than support it, and also that in a few months time you may have
thrown it all away and started again.

I, personally, often don't even try building such code; I just want to
know that other people can!

You still seem to be stuck in the mentality of wanting to produce a
finished product. But in computing we all know there is no such thing.
Releasing unfinished, half-baked code will NOT turn people off. In
fact, the effect is exactly the opposite: a huge marketing WIN!

If you still doubt me, just look at the number of questions about
building Ian Piumarta's idst repo, which has only seen one, trivial,
commit this year.

Releasing a technical report on software without code is like
publishing a review of a new piece of music but not the score: it's
tantalizing, but essentially useless. By waiting until you think you
have something worth releasing, you are losing years—YEARS!—of free
marketing and buzz. And you need it! Competitors doing merely
evolutionarily cool stuff will consign your entire project to the
dustbin of history, if you don't get people excited about what you're
doing, and if we're lucky, someone else will pick up the ideas in a
few decades when they have dwindled to a mere stepwise advance, just
before they become actually redundant.

The history of computing is littered with just such lost
opportunities; please don't become yet another.

--
http://rrt.sc3d.org

_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc

_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc

<div>
<a href="http://www.20thingsilearned.com/open-source/1">http://www.20thingsilearned.com/open-source/1</a><br><br>Cheers,<br>--Ken Ritchie (Atlanta)<br>;-) <br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Dec 17, 2010 at 8:13 AM, Oleksandr Nikitin <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:wizzard0@...m">wizzard0@...</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">?Can't agree more with Thomas.<br><br>
For most of the programmers out there, the best way to 'get in touch' with the project is to see the actual guts;<br>
leave the shiny presentations for sponsors and marketing people ;-)<br><br>
For example, the OMeta release was hugely successful - I find more and more applications of it, in completely<br>
different projects from different areas of computing, while other parts of FoNC remain only barely known, if at all,<br>
to people outside of this mailing list.<br><br>
-- Oleksandr Nikitin<br><br>
-----Original Message----- From: Reuben Thomas<br>
Sent: Friday, December 17, 2010 2:45 PM<br>
To: Fundamentals of New Computing<br>
Subject: [fonc] Show Us The Code!<div>
<div></div>
<div class="h5">
<br><br>
I started reading with interest the October 2010 STEPS Progress<br>
Report, then as soon as I got to the first screenshot, was overcome by<br>
a familiar feeling of depression: I strongly suspected, and quickly<br>
confirmed, that there was no code I could try.<br><br>
We've been over this ground in the past, and have seen two related<br>
arguments for not following the dictum "release early, release often":<br><br>
1. "It's not ready".<br><br>
2. "We don't have time to support people trying to build non-production code."<br><br>
To which the answers are, respectively:<br><br>
i. You don't understand "release early, release often".<br><br>
ii. You don't understand "release early, release often".<br><br>
Subscribers to this list do not, on the whole, care if code coming out<br>
of VPRI is buggy, non-portable, pre-alpha, or will only run correctly<br>
at a certain phase of the moon. We will quite happily help each other<br>
build and play with it. We understand that you have better things to<br>
do than support it, and also that in a few months time you may have<br>
thrown it all away and started again.<br><br>
I, personally, often don't even try building such code; I just want to<br>
know that other people can!<br><br>
You still seem to be stuck in the mentality of wanting to produce a<br>
finished product. But in computing we all know there is no such thing.<br>
Releasing unfinished, half-baked code will NOT turn people off. In<br>
fact, the effect is exactly the opposite: a huge marketing WIN!<br><br>
If you still doubt me, just look at the number of questions about<br>
building Ian Piumarta's idst repo, which has only seen one, trivial,<br>
commit this year.<br><br>
Releasing a technical report on software without code is like<br>
publishing a review of a new piece of music but not the score: it's<br>
tantalizing, but essentially useless. By waiting until you think you<br>
have something worth releasing, you are losing years&mdash;YEARS!&mdash;of free<br>
marketing and buzz. And you need it! Competitors doing merely<br>
evolutionarily cool stuff will consign your entire project to the<br>
dustbin of history, if you don't get people excited about what you're<br>
doing, and if we're lucky, someone else will pick up the ideas in a<br>
few decades when they have dwindled to a mere stepwise advance, just<br>
before they become actually redundant.<br><br>
The history of computing is littered with just such lost<br>
opportunities; please don't become yet another.<br><br>
-- <br><a href="http://rrt.sc3d.org" target="_blank">http://rrt.sc3d.org</a><br><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
fonc mailing list<br><a href="mailto:fonc@..." target="_blank">fonc@...</a><br><a href="http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc" target="_blank">http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc</a> <br><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
fonc mailing list<br><a href="mailto:fonc@..." target="_blank">fonc@...</a><br><a href="http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc" target="_blank">http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc</a><br>
</div>
</div>
</blockquote>
</div>
<br>
</div>
Ken Ritchie | 17 Dec 19:14 2010
Picon

Re: Show Us The Code!

I enjoy *both* the "writings" and the code.  Bring it *all* on!
And the "active essays" are a great way to integrate them.

Why?
[Writings] share vision, intent, possibilities, analysis, and background stories.
[Codings] implement specific realizations and demonstrations of dynamic concepts.
I am interested in both aspects, taken together when possible.
And, one can interact with, and explore an "active essay."

Viz., "active essay."  E.g., http://tinlizzie.org/jstile/#TileScript
Kudos!!!

Cheers,
--Ken Ritchie (Atlanta)


PS, What was I thinking...?

I used to say, "the code is the *ultimate* 'documentation' [of a program]" ;-)
Now, I'm attracted to a more holistic embodiment, including code...and more.

Historically, the world's code bodies have all too often been separated from "the rest of the story" (to borrow a phrase from the late Paul Harvey).

In recent years, the notion of "active essays" and other *integrated* writing and coding systems have been promoted by members of the VPRI community.

I acknowledge that it requires significant effort to craft an active essay, just as it does to form "code" or any other form of "writing."

Please know that I appreciate the static writings, too. 
E.g., VPRI Memo M-2003-002, "Background on How Children Learn" (Alan Kay).

So, y'all keep on PLAYING, SAYING, *and* WRITING!

Thanks again,
--Ken
;-)

<div><p>I enjoy *both* the "writings" and the code.&nbsp; Bring it *all* on!<br>And the "active essays" are a great way to integrate them.<br><br>Why?<br>[Writings] share vision, intent, possibilities, analysis, and background stories.<br>
[Codings] implement specific realizations and demonstrations of dynamic concepts.<br>I am interested in both aspects, taken together when possible. <br>And, one can interact with, and explore an "active essay."<br><br>Viz., "active essay."&nbsp; E.g., <a href="http://tinlizzie.org/jstile/#TileScript">http://tinlizzie.org/jstile/#TileScript</a> <br>Kudos!!!<br><br>Cheers,<br>--Ken Ritchie (Atlanta) <br><br><br>PS, What was I thinking...?<br><br>I used to say, "the code is the *ultimate* 'documentation' [of a program]" ;-) <br>Now, I'm attracted to a more holistic embodiment, including code...and more.<br><br>Historically, the world's code bodies have all too often been separated from "the rest of the story" (to borrow a phrase from the late Paul Harvey).<br><br>In recent years, the notion of "active essays" and other *integrated* writing and coding systems have been promoted by members of the VPRI community.<br><br>I acknowledge that it requires significant effort to craft an active essay, just as it does to form "code" or any other form of "writing."<br><br>Please know that I appreciate the static writings, too.&nbsp; <br>E.g., VPRI Memo M-2003-002, "Background on How Children Learn" (Alan Kay).<br><br>So, y'all keep on PLAYING, SAYING, *and* WRITING! <br><br>Thanks again,<br>
--Ken<br>;-) <br><br></p></div>

Gmane