Iliya Georgiev | 19 Sep 11:16 2014
Picon

About the reduce of complexity in educating children to program

Hello,
I am addressing this letter mainly to Mr. Alan Kay and his fellows at VPRI. I have an idea how to reduce complexity in educating children to program. This seems to be a part of a goal of the VPRI "to improve "powerful ideas education" for the world's children".

But in case my idea turns into success, a moral hazard emerges. If the children (6-14 years old) understand things better and can even program, can they become a victim of labor exploitation? Up to know they could be exploited physically. From now on they could be exploited mentally. OK, in the north in so called developed countries they may be protected, but in the south...

On the other side, don't we owe to the tomorrow people the possibility to understand the world we leave to them? Or they will be savages that use tools, but do not know how work. 

So if you want to wear the burden of the moral hazard, I will send the description of my idea to you and help with what I can. You will judge, if it is worth to do it.  It would be easily if people work cooperatively. That is a lesson children should learn too. The software could be made from one person, but there may be more challenges than one think. In case you agree to do it I will want you to publish online the results of the experiment. And if possible to make the program to run in a web browser and to release it freely too, just as you did in some of your recent experiments. 

It is strange that unlike more scientists, I will be equally happy from the success and failure of my idea.

Best regards,

Iliya Georgiev
<div><div dir="ltr">Hello,<div>I am addressing this letter mainly to Mr. Alan Kay and his fellows at VPRI. I have an idea how to reduce&nbsp;complexity in educating children to program. This seems to be a part of a goal of the VPRI "<span>to improve "powerful ideas education" for the world's children".</span>
</div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div><span>But in case my idea turns into success, a moral hazard emerges. If the children (6-14 years old) understand things better and can even program, can they become a victim of&nbsp;labor&nbsp;exploitation? Up to know they could be exploited&nbsp;physically. From now on they could be exploited mentally.&nbsp;OK, in the north in so&nbsp;called developed countries they may be protected, but in the south...</span></div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div><span>On the other side, don't we owe to the&nbsp;tomorrow&nbsp;people&nbsp;the possibility to understand the world we leave to them? Or they will be savages that use tools, but do not know how work.&nbsp;</span></div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div>
<span>So if you want to wear the burden of the moral hazard, I will send the description of my idea to you and help with what I can. You will judge, if it is worth to do it. &nbsp;</span><span>It would be&nbsp;easily</span><span>&nbsp;if people work&nbsp;cooperatively. That is a lesson children should learn too.&nbsp;</span><span>The software could be made from one person, but there may be more&nbsp;challenges&nbsp;than one think.&nbsp;In case you agree to do it I will want you to publish online the results of the experiment. And if possible to make the program to run in a web browser and to&nbsp;release&nbsp;it freely too, just&nbsp;as you did in some of your recent experiments.</span><span>&nbsp;</span>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>
<span>It is strange that unlike more scientists, I will be equally happy from the success and failure of my idea.</span><br>
</div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div><span>Best regards,</span></div>
<div><span><br></span></div>
<div><span>Iliya Georgiev</span></div>
</div></div>
Dan Amelang | 19 Sep 07:33 2014
Picon

Re: Morphic 3 defensive disclosure

Hi Juan,

Thanks for the screenshots, that helps a lot! Now, it would be ideal to have a visual like this to for the comparison: http://typekit.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/jensonw-900.png. But, I know that you've got limited time to work on this, and such a thing wouldn't be very high priority. Maybe down the road.

Also, comparing your renderer+stroke font to the recently open sourced Adobe font rasterizer would be interesting, too (http://blog.typekit.com/2013/05/01/adobe-contributes-cff-rasterizer-to-freetype/). As far as I can tell, Adobe's rasterizer is pretty much the the state-of-the-art rasterizer for outline font rasterization. If you're making the case that outline fonts are intrinsically unable to match the quality of your stroke font, this comparison would be a convincing way to do so.

Going back to the topic of Morphic 3 rendering TrueType fonts,  I'm attaching a few unfiltered zooms from your M3-TTF.png (your more recent M3-TTF-5.png looks the same in these areas). Notice the saturated colors in the middle of the black text. You mentioned that you have color fringing problems with <9 point sizes, but this font is about 12pt and the problem doesn't look like color fringing (i.e., the coloring isn't light nor just on the fringes, see http://typekit.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/gdi-cleartype.png for what I understand color fringing to look like). Maybe something else is going on here?

Back to your comments...I also like the idea of having a single rasterizer for text and general graphics. At least one that can be just parametrized or extended to handle text nicely as needed.

Yes, there is no question that one can improve on the visual output of the popular rasterizers (cairo, skia, antigrain, qt, etc.). The question has always been at what cost to software complexity and at what cost to performance.

I wasn't able to mentally separate your rasterization code from the rest of the Morphic 3 code (I'm not a big Smalltalker, so maybe it's just me), so I couldn't evaluate the complexity cost. It also looked like there were several optimizations mixed in that could have thrown off my understanding.

Would you be interested in creating a clean, totally not optimized (and thus slow), stand alone version of the rasterizer just for exposition purposes? Something for people like me to learn from? Again, I know you have very limited time. No rush.

Dan

On Thu, Sep 18, 2014 at 6:38 AM, J. Vuletich (mail lists) <juanlists-rnaRz0I4XnYdYYaOPf09RA@public.gmane.org> wrote:
 Hi Dan,

Quoting Dan Amelang <daniel.amelang-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org>:

Hi Juan,
 
Glad that you're making progress! One question: how hard would it be to
use a TrueType font (or any fill-based font) with your rasterizer?

It is some work, as the TrueType font needs to be imported. I already did this for DejaVu, printing a text sample to pdf, then converting that to svg with Inkscape, and then loading the svg in Cuis / Morphic 3 and using a "CodeGeneratingCanvas" to write the Smalltalk code for me. The attach is a sample image using just that font.

And, I would be interested in comparing the visual results of rendering
1) a TrueType font via FreeType, 2) a TrueType font via your Morphic 3
rasterizer, 3) your stroke font via the Morphic 3 rasterizer.

Taking a look at the attach, and the original attach in the mail linked below, and comparing with FreeType samples (for example, the regular Cuis fonts), I think that (sorted by visual quality):

a) For pointSize <=14
  1) Morphic 3 / StrokeFont with autohinting
  2) Feetype / TrueType with autohinting
  3) Morphic 3 / TrueType (no autohinting possible yet)
Note 1: For M3/TTF I could take the autohinting algorithm from Freetype, and quality would be at least on par with it, for point sizes >= 9
Note 2: For point sizes < 9 (fills less than one pixel), M3/TTF produces color fringes. I think this can be enhanced with some work.
I didn't spend much time on these issues, as I focused on StrokeFonts, that give best results, at least for a programming environment. Applications might need TTF, and there are possible enhancements to be done.

b) Rotated text. Here the difference in quality is rather small.
  1) Morphic 3 / StrokeFont (autohinting off)
  2) Feetype / TrueType
  3) Morphic 3 / TrueType

c) Point sizes > 14. Here I think the three alternatives look really good, no autohinting is needed, and there is no clear winner. (Same would go for most point sizes on a Retina or other hi dpi display, such as phones.)

    I know option 3) produces the best quality, I'm just interested in
the visual details. Such a comparison might also be helpful to showcase
and explain your work to others.

It is also worth noting that the usual Cairo + Freetype (or Cairo + Pango + Freetype) combo uses different algorithms for text and graphics, as Freetype can do much better than Cairo, but can not do general vector graphics. But Morphic 3 gives the same top quality for vector graphics too, as text is done simply by calling the svg like graphics primitives. Where Morphic 3 really stands out is when comparing against Cairo for drawing vector graphics!

I hope this helps.

Cheers,
Juan Vuletich


Dan

   On Wed, Sep 17, 2014 at 6:25 AM, J. Vuletich (mail lists)
<juanlists <at> jvuletich.org> wrote:

Hi Dan, Folks,

I finally published the Morphic 3 code in its current state. It is
still unfinished, and in need of cleanup. I hope you are still
interested in this stuff.

See
http://jvuletich.org/pipermail/cuis_jvuletich.org/2014-September/001692.html
I attached there a demo image with some SVG drawings, and some text at
rather small sizes, and some rotated text too. This took me a lot of time,
because for maximum text quality I had to design a new font, based on pen
strokes (and not fills!). I based it on the technical lettering I learned
at high school.

I think I'm now close to the limit of what is possible on regular LCDs
when trying to optimize crispness, absence of pixellation and absence
of color fringes. What I need to do now is to fill in some details,
then optimization and a VM plugin. Then it could become the default
graphics engine for Cuis ( www.cuis-smalltalk.org[1] ).


Cheers,
Juan Vuletich

Quoting Dan Amelang <daniel.amelang-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org>:
 

Hi Juan,

I think it's great that you are sharing your rasterization approach.
So far it sounds pretty interesting. FWIW, after you've released the
code, I would be interested in using this approach to create a higher
quality, drop-in replacement for the current "Rasterize" stage in the
Gezira rendering pipeline.

Best,

Dan

On Tue, Dec 3, 2013 at 6:24 PM, J. Vuletich (mail lists)
<juanlists <at> jvuletich.org> wrote:

Hi Folks,

The first defensive disclosure about Morphic 3 has been accepted and
published at

http://www.defensivepublications.org/publications/prefiltering-antialiasing-for-general-vector-graphics
and http://ip.com/IPCOM/000232657 ..

Morphic 3 is described at
http://www.jvuletich.org/Morphic3/Morphic3-201006.html

This paves the way for releasing all the code, as no one will be able
to
patent it.

Cheers,
Juan Vuletich

_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc

_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc

 



Links:
------
[1] http://www.cuis-smalltalk.org

<div><div dir="ltr">
<div>
<div>
<div>
<div>Hi Juan,<br><br>
</div>Thanks for the screenshots, that helps a lot! Now, it would be ideal to have a visual like this to for the comparison: <a href="http://typekit.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/jensonw-900.png" target="_blank">http://typekit.files.wordpress.com/2013/05/jensonw-900.png</a>. But, I know that you've got limited time to work on this, and such a thing wouldn't be very high priority. Maybe down the road.<br><br>
</div>Also, comparing your renderer+stroke font to the recently open sourced Adobe font rasterizer would be interesting, too (<a href="http://blog.typekit.com/2013/05/01/adobe-contributes-cff-rasterizer-to-freetype/" target="_blank">http://blog.typekit.com/2013/05/01/adobe-contributes-cff-rasterizer-to-freetype/</a>). As far as I can tell, Adobe's rasterizer is pretty much the the state-of-the-art rasterizer for outline font rasterization. If you're making the case that outline fonts are intrinsically unable to match the quality of your stroke font, this comparison would be a convincing way to do so.<br><br>
</div>
<div>Going back to the topic of Morphic 3 rendering TrueType fonts,&nbsp; I'm attaching a few unfiltered zooms from your M3-TTF.png (your more recent M3-TTF-5.png looks the same in these areas). Notice the saturated colors in the middle of the black text. You mentioned that you have color fringing problems with &lt;9 point sizes, but this font is about 12pt and the problem doesn't look like color fringing (i.e., the coloring isn't light nor just on the fringes, see <a href="http://typekit.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/gdi-cleartype.png">http://typekit.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/gdi-cleartype.png</a> for what I understand color fringing to look like). Maybe something else is going on here?<br><br>
</div>
<div>Back to your comments...I also like the idea of having a single rasterizer for text and general graphics. At least one that can be just parametrized or extended to handle text nicely as needed.<br>
</div>
<br>
</div>
<div>Yes, there is no question that one can improve on the visual output of the popular rasterizers (cairo, skia, antigrain, qt, etc.). The question has always been at what cost to software complexity and at what cost to performance.<br><br>I wasn't able to mentally separate your rasterization code from the rest of the Morphic 3 code (I'm not a big Smalltalker, so maybe it's just me), so I couldn't evaluate the complexity cost. It also looked like there were several optimizations mixed in that could have thrown off my understanding.<br><br>Would you be interested in creating a clean, totally not optimized (and thus slow), stand alone version of the rasterizer just for exposition purposes? Something for people like me to learn from? Again, I know you have very limited time. No rush.<br>
</div>
<div><br></div>Dan<br><div class="gmail_extra">
<br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Sep 18, 2014 at 6:38 AM, J. Vuletich (mail lists) <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:juanlists@..." target="_blank">juanlists@...</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">&nbsp;Hi Dan,<br><br>
Quoting Dan Amelang &lt;<a href="mailto:daniel.amelang@..." target="_blank">daniel.amelang@...</a>&gt;:<br><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
Hi Juan,<br>
&nbsp;<span><br>
Glad that you're making progress! One question: how hard would it be to<br>
use a TrueType font (or any fill-based font) with your rasterizer?<br></span>
</blockquote>
<br>
It is some work, as the TrueType font needs to be imported. I already did this for DejaVu, printing a text sample to pdf, then converting that to svg with Inkscape, and then loading the svg in Cuis / Morphic 3 and using a "CodeGeneratingCanvas" to write the Smalltalk code for me. The attach is a sample image using just that font.<span><br><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
And, I would be interested in comparing the visual results of rendering<br>
1) a TrueType font via FreeType, 2) a TrueType font via your Morphic 3<br>
rasterizer, 3) your stroke font via the Morphic 3 rasterizer.<br>
</blockquote>
<br></span>
Taking a look at the attach, and the original attach in the mail linked below, and comparing with FreeType samples (for example, the regular Cuis fonts), I think that (sorted by visual quality):<br><br>
a) For pointSize &lt;=14<br>
&nbsp; 1) Morphic 3 / StrokeFont with autohinting<br>
&nbsp; 2) Feetype / TrueType with autohinting<br>
&nbsp; 3) Morphic 3 / TrueType (no autohinting possible yet)<br>
Note 1: For M3/TTF I could take the autohinting algorithm from Freetype, and quality would be at least on par with it, for point sizes &gt;= 9<br>
Note 2: For point sizes &lt; 9 (fills less than one pixel), M3/TTF produces color fringes. I think this can be enhanced with some work.<br>
I didn't spend much time on these issues, as I focused on StrokeFonts, that give best results, at least for a programming environment. Applications might need TTF, and there are possible enhancements to be done.<br><br>
b) Rotated text. Here the difference in quality is rather small.<br>
&nbsp; 1) Morphic 3 / StrokeFont (autohinting off)<br>
&nbsp; 2) Feetype / TrueType<br>
&nbsp; 3) Morphic 3 / TrueType<br><br>
c) Point sizes &gt; 14. Here I think the three alternatives look really good, no autohinting is needed, and there is no clear winner. (Same would go for most point sizes on a Retina or other hi dpi display, such as phones.)<span><br><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
&nbsp; &nbsp; I know option 3) produces the best quality, I'm just interested in<br>
the visual details. Such a comparison might also be helpful to showcase<br>
and explain your work to others.<br>
</blockquote>
<br></span>
It is also worth noting that the usual Cairo + Freetype (or Cairo + Pango + Freetype) combo uses different algorithms for text and graphics, as Freetype can do much better than Cairo, but can not do general vector graphics. But Morphic 3 gives the same top quality for vector graphics too, as text is done simply by calling the svg like graphics primitives. Where Morphic 3 really stands out is when comparing against Cairo for drawing vector graphics!<span><br><br>
I hope this helps.<br><br>
Cheers,<br>
Juan Vuletich<br><br></span><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
<br><span>
Dan<br><br>
&nbsp; &nbsp;On Wed, Sep 17, 2014 at 6:25 AM, J. Vuletich (mail lists)<br>
&lt;<a href="mailto:juanlists@..." target="_blank">juanlists <at> jvuletich.org</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br></span><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
<span>
Hi Dan, Folks,<br><br>
I finally published the Morphic 3 code in its current state. It is<br>
still unfinished, and in need of cleanup. I hope you are still<br>
interested in this stuff.<br><br>
See<br><a href="http://jvuletich.org/pipermail/cuis_jvuletich.org/2014-September/001692.html" target="_blank">http://jvuletich.org/pipermail/cuis_jvuletich.org/2014-September/001692.html</a><br>
I attached there a demo image with some SVG drawings, and some text at<br>
rather small sizes, and some rotated text too. This took me a lot of time,<br>
because for maximum text quality I had to design a new font, based on pen<br>
strokes (and not fills!). I based it on the technical lettering I learned<br>
at high school.<br><br>
I think I'm now close to the limit of what is possible on regular LCDs<br>
when trying to optimize crispness, absence of pixellation and absence<br>
of color fringes. What I need to do now is to fill in some details,<br>
then optimization and a VM plugin. Then it could become the default<br></span>
graphics engine for Cuis ( <a href="http://www.cuis-smalltalk.org" target="_blank">www.cuis-smalltalk.org</a>[1] ).<div><div>
<br><br>
Cheers,<br>
Juan Vuletich<br><br>
Quoting Dan Amelang &lt;<a href="mailto:daniel.amelang@..." target="_blank">daniel.amelang@...</a>&gt;:<br>
&nbsp;<br><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
Hi Juan,<br><br>
I think it's great that you are sharing your rasterization approach.<br>
So far it sounds pretty interesting. FWIW, after you've released the<br>
code, I would be interested in using this approach to create a higher<br>
quality, drop-in replacement for the current "Rasterize" stage in the<br>
Gezira rendering pipeline.<br><br>
Best,<br><br>
Dan<br><br>
On Tue, Dec 3, 2013 at 6:24 PM, J. Vuletich (mail lists)<br>
&lt;<a href="mailto:juanlists@..." target="_blank">juanlists <at> jvuletich.org</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
Hi Folks,<br><br>
The first defensive disclosure about Morphic 3 has been accepted and<br>
published at<br><br>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
</div></div>
</blockquote>
</blockquote>
<div><div>
<a href="http://www.defensivepublications.org/publications/prefiltering-antialiasing-for-general-vector-graphics" target="_blank">http://www.defensivepublications.org/publications/prefiltering-antialiasing-for-general-vector-graphics</a><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote">
<blockquote class="gmail_quote">
and <a href="http://ip.com/IPCOM/000232657" target="_blank">http://ip.com/IPCOM/000232657</a> ..<br><br>
Morphic 3 is described at<br><a href="http://www.jvuletich.org/Morphic3/Morphic3-201006.html" target="_blank">http://www.jvuletich.org/Morphic3/Morphic3-201006.html</a><br><br>
This paves the way for releasing all the code, as no one will be able<br>
to<br>
patent it.<br><br>
Cheers,<br>
Juan Vuletich<br><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
fonc mailing list<br><a href="mailto:fonc@..." target="_blank">fonc@...</a><br><a href="http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc" target="_blank">http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc</a><br>
</blockquote>
<br>
_______________________________________________<br>
fonc mailing list<br><a href="mailto:fonc@..." target="_blank">fonc@...</a><br><a href="http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc" target="_blank">http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc</a><br>
</blockquote>
<br>
&nbsp;<br>
</blockquote></blockquote>
<br><br><br>
</div></div>
Links:<br>
------<br>
[1] <a href="http://www.cuis-smalltalk.org" target="_blank">http://www.cuis-smalltalk.org</a><br>
</blockquote>
</div>
<br>
</div>
</div></div>
Loup Vaillant-David | 18 Sep 23:11 2014
Picon

Earley Parsing Explained (incomplete first draft)

Hi,

After spending months banging my head over Earley Parsing, I have
decided to write a tutorial.  Ian once said Earley parsing is simple
and easy to implement.  I agree with "simple", but not with "easy".
The required background knowledge is not trivial.

This tutorial is an attempt to gather this knowledge in one place.
Nothing fancy, no deep math, no proof of correctness.  Just a
(hopefully) intuitive explanation of the concepts, needed to implement
Earley parsing.  The goal is to help competent programmers who know
little about parsing to write their own Earley parsing framework.

So far, I have done most of the recogniser.  The following pages are
"done", and up for review:

http://loup-vaillant.fr/tutorials/earley-parsing/
http://loup-vaillant.fr/tutorials/earley-parsing/what-and-why
http://loup-vaillant.fr/tutorials/earley-parsing/chart-parsing
http://loup-vaillant.fr/tutorials/earley-parsing/recogniser

Questions and criticisms are most welcome.  I'd like to know about any
factual inaccuracy, poor wording, confusing explanation… please don't
hesitate to question anything, even the structure of this tutorial.

Enjoy, and thanks,
Loup.
_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc <at> vpri.org
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc
Tony Savarimuthu | 31 Jul 00:18 2014
Picon

SASO 2014 - Call for participation (8-12 September, Imperial College, London)

************************************************************************************************************

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

 

The Eight IEEE International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems

(SASO 2014)

 

Imperial College, London (UK); 8-12 September 2014

http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/

************************************************************************************************************

 

--------------------

   Registration

--------------------

The Early registration is August 22, 2014

Interested people can register at:

http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/registration.php

 

A single registration fee includes access to the main conference, tutorials, and workshops. Moreover, it includes a conference kit with electronic proceedings, all coffee breaks, lunches, free entrance to the Welcome Reception and Conference Dinner.

 

Registration to SASO provides access to all sessions of the co-located events:

- CAC (Cloud and Autonomic Computing), www.autonomic-conference.org/

- P2P (Peer-to-Peer Computing), www.p2p-conference.org/p2p14/

- OGF (Open Grid Forum), www.ogf.org/

 

 

--------------------

   Program

--------------------

The program of scientific papers and posters is available at:

http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/program.php

 

SASO 2014 features also:

- workshops http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/workshops.php

- tutorials http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/tutorials.php

- demos http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/demos.php

 

 

--------------------

   Social event

--------------------

- Reception at London's renowned science museum, http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/

- Banquet at the Kia Oval http://www.kiaoval.com/ (leave with an increased knowledge of science, technology AND cricket)

 

Moreover, you can enjoy London’s museums, art galleries, restaurants, monuments, shops, night spots, sports arenas, and lots of events

 

--------------------

   Venue and accommodation

--------------------

The conference will take place at Imperial College London.

 

Hotels near the venue may be found at the Imperial College Accommodation site: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/conferenceandevents/accommodation/hotelaccommodation

 

 

---------------------

   Contact Details

---------------------

 

Please send any inquiries to:

 

mailto:saso2014-bC77Qfv0vuxrovVCs/uTlw@public.gmane.org

 

 

 

<div>
<div class="WordSection1">
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>************************************************************************************************************<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>CALL FOR PARTICIPATION<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>The Eight IEEE International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>(SASO 2014)<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>Imperial College, London (UK); 8-12 September 2014
<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>************************************************************************************************************<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>--------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>&nbsp;&nbsp; Registration<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>--------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>The Early registration is August 22, 2014<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>Interested people can register at:<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/registration.php<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>A single registration fee includes access to the main conference, tutorials, and workshops. Moreover, it includes a conference kit with electronic
 proceedings, all coffee breaks, lunches, free entrance to the Welcome Reception and Conference Dinner.<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>Registration to SASO provides access to all sessions of the co-located events:<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>- CAC (Cloud and Autonomic Computing), www.autonomic-conference.org/<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>- P2P (Peer-to-Peer Computing), www.p2p-conference.org/p2p14/<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>- OGF (Open Grid Forum), www.ogf.org/<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>--------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>&nbsp;&nbsp; Program<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>--------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>The program of scientific papers and posters is available at:<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/program.php<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>SASO 2014 features also:<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>- workshops http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/workshops.php<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>- tutorials http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/tutorials.php<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>- demos http://www.iis.ee.imperial.ac.uk/saso2014/demos.php<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>--------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>&nbsp;&nbsp; Social event<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>--------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>- Reception at London's renowned science museum, http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>- Banquet at the Kia Oval http://www.kiaoval.com/ (leave with an increased knowledge of science, technology AND cricket)<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>Moreover, you can enjoy London&rsquo;s museums, art galleries, restaurants, monuments, shops, night spots, sports arenas, and lots of events<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>--------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>&nbsp;&nbsp; Venue and accommodation<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>--------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>The conference will take place at Imperial College London.<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>Hotels near the venue may be found at the Imperial College Accommodation site: http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/conferenceandevents/accommodation/hotelaccommodation<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>---------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>&nbsp;&nbsp; Contact Details<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>---------------------<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>Please send any inquiries to:<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>mailto:saso2014@...<p></p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span><p>&nbsp;</p></span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><p>&nbsp;</p></p>
</div>
</div>
aotani | 22 Jul 07:35 2014
Picon

Extended deadline: [CFP] AOAsia/Pacific 2014 co-located with FSE 2014

[Apologies if you received this more than once]
==============================================================================
			   Call for Papers:
			  AOAsia/Pacific'14
A one day workshop co-located with FSE 2014 in Hong Kong, November 21, 2014
	     http://prg.is.titech.ac.jp/events/aoasia14/
==============================================================================

* Overview
Separation of concerns is one of the main tenets of software
engineering; it allows developers to reason about a problem in
sensible portions, regardless which phase of the life cycle theyre
working in. Many researchers in software engineering are actually in
the field of advanced software modularization techniques such as
aspect-orientation without realizing it.

A growing number of advanced modularization techniques, including
aspect-oriented programming (AOP) and context-oriented programming
(COP), are investigated to support separation of concerns in software
development. Those techniques need dedicated support for analysis of
artifacts at the various stages of software development. Developers
need to be able to understand, visualize, specify, verify and test,
with existence of those advanced modularization techniques,
requirements, architectures, designs and programs to make it an
industrially viable technology. Tool support is further needed for the
identification of latent (non-modularized) crosscutting concerns in
legacy software and for their subsequent refactoring into modules.

AOAsia/Pacific is a series of international workshops on advanced
modularization techniques not specific to AOP nor COP initially
organized by Asia/Pacific-related researchers in cooperation with many
researchers all over the world. One of the aims for this workshop is
to bring together researchers, who are tackling the problems of
advanced separation of concerns, but who are not yet connected to this
growing, thriving community. The workshop also intends to provide a
forum for discussion of new ideas, new directions, and new
applications.

Though the workshop title contains the term “Asia/Pacific”, it is
open to everyone all over the world who are interested in advanced
modularization techniques. We welcome your involvement!

* Topics of Interest
We invite novel contributions on any topics in advanced software
modularization techniques including (but not limited to)
- Applications and tools
- Software architectures and product lines
- Aspect interference and composition
- Contracts, components and aspects
- Model Driven Architecture and UML
- Software development methods and patterns
- Reverse engineering and refactoring
- Reflection and meta programming
- Semantics and type systems
- Verification, validation and testing
- Distributed systems and middleware
- Evolution and adaptability
- Evaluation and metrics

* Workshop Format
The planned workshop format is poster presentation and a short
lightning talk. One or two supervisors are assigned for each
presentation and lead discussions.

* Submissions
Two separate paper submission deadlines and review stages are
offered. Papers accepted in the first round will be published in ACM
DL and our workshop proceedings and presented at the workshop. Papers
accepted in the secound round will be published in only our workshop
proceedings and presented at the workshop and will not be published in
ACM DL.  

Short papers must be formatted according to ACM SIG format and can be
submitted via [EasyChair] as a PDF file of at most 3 pages. Paper
submission deadlines for the first and secound rounds are July 18,
2014 and October 1, 2014, respectively. Authors in the first and
secound round will be notified of the acceptance or rejection of their
submissions by August 4, 2014 and October 15, 2014.

[EasyChair]: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=aoasia2014

* Important Dates
|                  | First round (ACM DL) | Second round  (Not ACM DL) |
| Paper submission | August 1, 2014       | October 1, 2014            |
| Notification     | August 8, 2014       | October 15, 2014           |
| Camera-ready     | August 18, 2014      | November 1, 2014           |

* Program Committee
- Tomoyuki Aotani:  Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
- Kung Chen: National Chengchi University, Taiwan
- Takashi Ishio: Osaka University, Japan
- Jianjun Zhao: Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

* Organizers
- Tomoyuki Aotani:  Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
- Kung Chen: National Chengchi University, Taiwan
- Shigeru Chiba: University of Tokyo, Japan
- Takashi Ishio: Osaka University, Japan
- Hidehiko Masuhara: Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
- Hongyu Zhang: Tsinghua University, China
- Jianjun Zhao: Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
[Apologies if you received this more than once]
==============================================================================
			   Call for Papers:
			  AOAsia/Pacific'14
A one day workshop co-located with FSE 2014 in Hong Kong, November 21, 2014
	     http://prg.is.titech.ac.jp/events/aoasia14/
==============================================================================

* Overview
Separation of concerns is one of the main tenets of software
engineering; it allows developers to reason about a problem in
sensible portions, regardless which phase of the life cycle theyre
working in. Many researchers in software engineering are actually in
the field of advanced software modularization techniques such as
aspect-orientation without realizing it.

A growing number of advanced modularization techniques, including
aspect-oriented programming (AOP) and context-oriented programming
(COP), are investigated to support separation of concerns in software
development. Those techniques need dedicated support for analysis of
artifacts at the various stages of software development. Developers
need to be able to understand, visualize, specify, verify and test,
with existence of those advanced modularization techniques,
requirements, architectures, designs and programs to make it an
industrially viable technology. Tool support is further needed for the
identification of latent (non-modularized) crosscutting concerns in
legacy software and for their subsequent refactoring into modules.

AOAsia/Pacific is a series of international workshops on advanced
modularization techniques not specific to AOP nor COP initially
organized by Asia/Pacific-related researchers in cooperation with many
researchers all over the world. One of the aims for this workshop is
to bring together researchers, who are tackling the problems of
advanced separation of concerns, but who are not yet connected to this
growing, thriving community. The workshop also intends to provide a
forum for discussion of new ideas, new directions, and new
applications.

Though the workshop title contains the term “Asia/Pacific”, it is
open to everyone all over the world who are interested in advanced
modularization techniques. We welcome your involvement!

* Topics of Interest
We invite novel contributions on any topics in advanced software
modularization techniques including (but not limited to)
- Applications and tools
- Software architectures and product lines
- Aspect interference and composition
- Contracts, components and aspects
- Model Driven Architecture and UML
- Software development methods and patterns
- Reverse engineering and refactoring
- Reflection and meta programming
- Semantics and type systems
- Verification, validation and testing
- Distributed systems and middleware
- Evolution and adaptability
- Evaluation and metrics

* Workshop Format
The planned workshop format is poster presentation and a short
lightning talk. One or two supervisors are assigned for each
presentation and lead discussions.

* Submissions
Two separate paper submission deadlines and review stages are
offered. Papers accepted in the first round will be published in ACM
DL and our workshop proceedings and presented at the workshop. Papers
accepted in the secound round will be published in only our workshop
proceedings and presented at the workshop and will not be published in
ACM DL.  

Short papers must be formatted according to ACM SIG format and can be
submitted via [EasyChair] as a PDF file of at most 3 pages. Paper
submission deadlines for the first and secound rounds are July 18,
2014 and October 1, 2014, respectively. Authors in the first and
secound round will be notified of the acceptance or rejection of their
submissions by August 4, 2014 and October 15, 2014.

[EasyChair]: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=aoasia2014

* Important Dates
|                  | First round (ACM DL) | Second round  (Not ACM DL) |
| Paper submission | August 1, 2014       | October 1, 2014            |
| Notification     | August 8, 2014       | October 15, 2014           |
| Camera-ready     | August 18, 2014      | November 1, 2014           |

* Program Committee
- Tomoyuki Aotani:  Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
- Kung Chen: National Chengchi University, Taiwan
- Takashi Ishio: Osaka University, Japan
- Jianjun Zhao: Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

* Organizers
- Tomoyuki Aotani:  Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
- Kung Chen: National Chengchi University, Taiwan
- Shigeru Chiba: University of Tokyo, Japan
- Takashi Ishio: Osaka University, Japan
- Hidehiko Masuhara: Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan
- Hongyu Zhang: Tsinghua University, China
- Jianjun Zhao: Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
Loup Vaillant-David | 23 Jun 03:27 2014
Picon

Left-most derivation with Earley Parsing

Hello,

I am currently trying to implement Earley Parsing.  My ultimate goal
is to combine all the advantages of OMeta and Earley parsing:

- OMeta can handle some context-sensitive grammars.
- OMeta's prioritised choice have obvious semantics.
- Earley work on left-recursive grammars out of the box.
- Earley doesn't require explicit look-ahead.

One crucial aspect of this is the handling of ambiguity.  Basically, I
want to chose a parse tree automatically, in an obvious way, while
letting the user have some control.  For this, OMeta's prioritised
choice is beautiful.

And this is where I am stuck.  I don't know how to turn my heap of
Earley states into a parse tree that makes sense.  I could chose an
arbitrary parse tree of course, but that wouldn't be acceptable.  I
want a *predictable* choice.

I *believe* I want to find the left-most derivations that is based on
prioritised choice.  But I don't know how to get it.

---

Here is an example, so you can have a feel of my progress so far.
First, One sweet ambiguous grammar:

  A -> A A
  A -> 'b'

Second, an input: "bbb"

The derivation I want with this grammar is this one:

A => AA => AAA => bAA => bbA => bbb

Which yields the following parse tree:

      A
     / \
    A   A
   / \  |
  A   A b
  |   |
  b   b

Note that there is another leftmost derivation:

A => AA => bA => bAA => bbA => bbb

Which yields a different parse tree:

    A
   / \
  A   A
  |  / \
  b A   A
    |   |
    b   b

The difference between the two is how I derived the symbol 'A' in the
third step: I can chose 'AA', or I can chose 'b'.  If I want to
respect prioritised choice, the first parse tree is the correct one.

Alas, I don't have direct access to those derivations, or to the
resulting parse trees.  Instead, I have these Earley states:

=== 1 ===
1  (1)  A -> • A A
2  (1)  A -> • 'b'

=== 2 ===
1  (1)  A -> 'b' •   (1,2| b )
2  (1)  A -> A • A   (1,1|2,1)
3  (2)  A -> • A A
4  (2)  A -> • 'b'

=== 3 ===
1  (2)  A -> 'b' •   (2,4| b )
2  (1)  A -> A A •   (2,2|3,1)
3  (2)  A -> A • A   (2,3|3,1)
4  (1)  A -> A • A   (1,1|3,2)
5  (3)  A -> • A A
6  (3)  A -> • 'b'

=== 4 ===
1  (3)  A -> 'b' •   (3,6| b )
2  (2)  A -> A A •   (3,3|4,1)
3  (1)  A -> A A •   (3,4|4,1) (2,2|4,2)
4  (3)  A -> A • A   (3,5|4,1)
5  (2)  A -> A • A   (2,3|4,2)
6  (1)  A -> A • A   (1,1|4,3)
7  (4)  A -> • A A
8  (4)  A -> • 'b'

- The 1st column is just an index.
- The 2nd column is the starting point of the state.
- The 3rd column is the grammar rule (the dot indicates where we are).
- The 4th column is a list of back pointers the states that could have
  triggered the creation of the current one (If there is more than
  one set of pointers, this means ambiguity.)

I *think* I understand the tree structure behind those back pointers.
But I can't find the left-most derivation I want from there.  I
basically have two problems:

  - These are *back* pointers.  Any ambiguity is revealed from the
    *right* side of the rule.  I don't want a rightmost derivation, I
    want a leftmost.
  - Some ambiguities are not readily solvable through prioritised
    choice:  sometimes, the Earley sets mentioned by the child
    pointers don't differ by rule, only by how much input they
    consumed.

I tried not working with the back pointers directly.  It is possible
for instance to construct a forward chain from the backward one.  Here
is what I got:

=== 1 ===
1  (1)  A -> • A A   (2,2|2,1) (3,4|3,2)
2  (1)  A -> • 'b'   (2,1| b )

=== 2 ===
1  (1)  A -> 'b' •
2  (1)  A -> A • A   (3,2|3,1) (4,3|4,2)
3  (2)  A -> • A A   (3,3|3,1)
4  (2)  A -> • 'b'   (3,1| b )

=== 3 ===
1  (2)  A -> 'b' •
2  (1)  A -> A A •
3  (2)  A -> A • A   (4,2|4,1)
4  (1)  A -> A • A   (4,3|4,1)
5  (3)  A -> • A A
6  (3)  A -> • 'b'   (4,1| b )

=== 4 ===
1  (3)  A -> 'b' •
2  (2)  A -> A A •
3  (1)  A -> A A •
4  (3)  A -> A • A
5  (2)  A -> A • A
6  (1)  A -> A • A
7  (4)  A -> • A A
8  (4)  A -> • 'b'

It doesn't make much sense.  The child pointers point to end states,
not to start states.  And there is also one too many ambiguity here.
So, I figured I may need something more like the SPPF format described
by Elizabeth Scott (2008).  I don't fully understand this format
however, and the algorithms she described to generate it are still
impenetrable to me.  Anyway, that wouldn't be enough for my leftmost
derivation.

Ian promised us something easy to implement in his "To Trap a Better
Mouse" talk¹, but the rabbit hole seems to be a bit deeper than that.

[1]: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGeN2IC7N0Q&t=42m0s

---

Hence my question: how do we find a leftmost derivation with Earley
parsing?  Is there a paper, or a tutorial somewhere?

Thanks,
Loup.
_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc <at> vpri.org
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc
Casey Ransberger | 5 Jun 15:23 2014
Picon

Xanadu has a heartbeat!

Thought I'd let folks know that the Xanadu project has made some very good progress. They now have a mostly-finished implementation in Javascript.


--Casey
<div><div dir="ltr">Thought I'd let folks know that the Xanadu project has made some very good progress. They now have a mostly-finished implementation in Javascript.<div><br></div>
<div>
<a href="http://xanadu.com">http://xanadu.com</a><br>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>--Casey</div>
</div></div>
shawnmorel | 25 May 21:28 2014

Mill CPU architecture specification

I don’t think anything about the mill has been posted here before.

Here Ivan covers the way entire architecture families are generated from specifications. Including programmatically defining ASM code in a high level language (C++ in this case) but there’s conceptual overlap in how Maru allows defining ASM formats via a function call.


shawn
<div>I don&rsquo;t think anything about the mill has been posted here before.<div><br></div>
<div>Here Ivan covers the way entire architecture families are generated from specifications. Including programmatically defining ASM code in a high level language (C++ in this case) but there&rsquo;s conceptual overlap in how Maru allows defining ASM formats via a function call.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div><a href="http://millcomputing.com/docs/specification/">http://millcomputing.com/docs/specification/</a></div>
<div><br></div>
<div>shawn</div>
</div>
Ryan Mitchley | 10 Apr 22:17 2014
Picon

The 10k problem

So, it seems that we have some ideas regarding the 20k LOC problem...
Maybe the list (being somewhat quiet) has some fresh suggestions for the C10k problem?



<div><div dir="ltr">
<div class="">So, it seems that we have some ideas regarding the 20k LOC problem...<div class="">
</div>
</div>
<div class="">Maybe the list (being somewhat quiet) has some fresh suggestions for the C10k problem?</div>
<div class="">
<span><a href="http://www.kegel.com/c10k.html">http://www.kegel.com/c10k.html</a></span><br>
</div>
<div class=""><span><br></span></div>
<div class="">
<span><br></span>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div class="">
</div>
</div></div>
Edd Barrett | 10 Apr 12:40 2014
Picon

Dynamic Languages Symposium: Call for Papers

===========================================================================
                      Dynamic Languages Symposium 2014
                              October 21, 2014

               Co-located with SPLASH 2014, Portland, OR, USA

             http://www.dynamic-languages-symposium.org/dls-14/
===========================================================================

The 10th Dynamic Languages Symposium (DLS) at SPLASH 2014 is the premier
forum for researchers and practitioners to share knowledge and research on
dynamic languages, their implementation, and applications. The influence of
dynamic languages -- from Lisp to Smalltalk to Python to Javascript -- on
real-world practice, and research, continues to grow.

DLS 2014 invites high quality papers reporting original research, innovative
contributions, or experience related to dynamic languages, their
implementation, and applications. Accepted papers will be published in the
ACM Digital Library, and freely available for 2 weeks before and after the
event itself. Areas of interest include but are not limited to:

 * Innovative language features and implementation techniques
 * Development and platform support, tools
 * Interesting applications
 * Domain-oriented programming
 * Very late binding, dynamic composition, and run-time adaptation
 * Reflection and meta-programming
 * Software evolution
 * Language symbiosis and multi-paradigm languages
 * Dynamic optimization
 * Hardware support
 * Experience reports and case studies
 * Educational approaches and perspectives
 * Semantics of dynamic languages

  Submissions

Submissions should not have been published previously nor be under review at
other events. Research papers should describe work that advances the current
state of the art. Experience papers should be of broad interest and should
describe insights gained from substantive practical applications. The program
committee will evaluate each contributed paper based on its relevance,
significance, clarity, length, and originality.

Papers are to be submitted electronically at
http://www.easychair.org/conferences?conf=dls14 in PDF format. Submissions
must be in the ACM format (see http://www.sigplan.org/authorInformation.htm)
and not exceed 12 pages. Authors are reminded that brevity is a virtue.

DLS 2014 will run a two-phase reviewing process to help authors make their
final papers the best that they can be. After the first round of reviews,
papers will be rejected, conditionally accepted, or unconditionally accepted.
Conditionally accepted papers will be given a list of issues raised by
reviewers. Authors will then submit a revised version of the paper with a
cover letter explaining how they have / why they have not addressed these
issues. The reviewers will then consider the cover letter and revised paper
and recommend final acceptance / rejection.

  Important dates

Submissions: June 8 2014 (FIRM DEADLINE)
First phase notification: July 14 2014
Revisions due: August 4 2014
Final notification: August 11 2014
Camera ready: August 15 2014
DLS: October 21 2014

  Programme chair

Laurence Tratt, King's College London, UK
e-mail: dls14@...

  Publicity chair

Edd Barrett, King's College London, UK

  Programme committee

Gilad Bracha, Google, US
Jonathan Edwards, MIT, US
Robert Hirschfeld, Hasso-Plattner-Institut Potsdam, DE
Roberto Ierusalimschy, PUC-Rio, BR
Sergio Maffeis, Imperial College London, UK
Stefan Marr, INRIA, FR
Oscar Nierstrasz, University of Bern, CH
James Noble, Victoria University of Wellington, NZ
Shriram Krishnamurthi, Brown University, US
Chris Seaton, University of Manchester, UK
Nikolai Tillmann, Microsoft Research, US
Sam Tobin-Hochstadt, Indiana University, US
Jan Vitek, Purdue University, US
Christian Wimmer, Oracle Labs, US
Peng Wu, IBM Research, US
Ed Spittles | 8 Apr 12:02 2014
Picon

Re: Communicating with Aliens Problem

Hmm, quite a test of Unicode!

'FACE WITH ROLLING EYES' not in unicode. Perhaps use
'FACE WITH STUCK-OUT TONGUE AND WINKING EYE' (U+1F61C)
'SPARKLES' (U+2728)
'FEARFUL FACE' (U+1F628)
'PERSON RAISING BOTH HANDS IN CELEBRATION' (U+1F64C)
'FERRIS WHEEL' (U+1F3A1)
'DOLPHIN' (U+1F42C)

In a suitably unicode-capable setup, that should be:
😜✨😨🙌🎡🐬

(And perhaps in a less capable setup, some substitution using the unicode descriptions would be ideal?)

Cheers
Ed


On 8 April 2014 00:03, Alan Moore <kahunamoore-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org> wrote:
     

translated: so long and thanks for all the fish :-)

Smile...

Alan M.



On Sun, Apr 6, 2014 at 7:01 PM, Shawn Vincent <svincent-ZCpjGEDhgI9Wk0Htik3J/w@public.gmane.org> wrote:
Greetings!  Long time lurker, first time poster.

I am very interested in learning more about the state of the art in the "communicating with aliens" problem mentioned here and other places.

What techniques have been developed or considered for this?

One technique I have seen references to are method locators (referenced in the VPRI published papers).  Are there other techniques as well?

Any pointers to information would be most welcome.

Thanks very much!
    -Shawn.



_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc




--
"Whatever you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Begin it now." - Goethe

_______________________________________________
fonc mailing list
fonc-uVco7kAcSAQ@public.gmane.org
http://vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc


<div><div dir="ltr"><div><div><div><div>
<div>Hmm, quite a test of Unicode!<br><br>'FACE WITH ROLLING EYES' not in unicode. Perhaps use <br>'FACE WITH STUCK-OUT TONGUE AND WINKING EYE' (U+1F61C)</div>
<div>'SPARKLES' (U+2728)<br>
'FEARFUL FACE' (U+1F628)<br>'PERSON RAISING BOTH HANDS IN CELEBRATION' (U+1F64C)<br>'FERRIS WHEEL' (U+1F3A1)<br>'DOLPHIN' (U+1F42C)<br><br><div>In a suitably unicode-capable setup, that should be:</div>
<div>&#128540;&#10024;&#128552;&#128588;&#127905;&#128044;<br>
</div>
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<div>(And perhaps in a less capable setup, some substitution using the unicode descriptions would be ideal?)</div>
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<div>Cheers</div>
<div>Ed</div>
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<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On 8 April 2014 00:03, Alan Moore <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:kahunamoore@..." target="_blank">kahunamoore@...</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
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<div>translated: so long and thanks for all the fish :-)</div>
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<div>Smile...</div>
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<div>Alan M.</div>
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<div><div class="h5">On Sun, Apr 6, 2014 at 7:01 PM, Shawn Vincent <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:svincent@..." target="_blank">svincent@...</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
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<div dir="ltr">Greetings! &nbsp;Long time lurker, first time poster.<div><br></div>
<div>I am very interested in learning more about the state of the art in the "communicating with aliens" problem mentioned here and other places.</div>

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<div>What techniques have been developed or considered for this?</div>
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<div>One technique I have seen references to are method locators (referenced in the VPRI published papers). &nbsp;Are there other techniques as well?</div>

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<div>Any pointers to information would be most welcome.</div>
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<div>Thanks very much!<span><br>&nbsp; &nbsp; -Shawn.</span>
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<span class=""><br><br clear="all"><div><br></div>-- <br>"Whatever 
                you can do, or dream you can do, begin it. Boldness has genius, 
                power, and magic in it. Begin it now." - Goethe
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Gmane