newsletter | 31 Jan 14:15 2016

CfP: SASO 2016 - IEEE International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems, September 12-16, Augsburg, Germany

*************************************************************************
CALL FOR PAPERS 

Tenth IEEE International Conference on Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing Systems 
(SASO 2016) 

Augsburg, Germany; 12-16 September 2016 
http://uni-augsburg.de/saso2016
 <at> SASO2016Conf
************************************************************************* 

Part of FAS* - Foundation and Applications of Self* Computing Conferences 
Co-located with: 
The International Conference on Cloud and Autonomic Computing (ICCAC 2016)
http://iccac2016.se.rit.edu

------------------- 
Aims and Scope 
------------------- 

The aim of the Self-Adaptive and Self-Organizing systems conference series (SASO) is to provide a forum
for the foundations of a principled approach to engineering systems, networks, and services based on
self-adaptation and self-organization. The complexity of current and emerging networks, software,
and services, especially when dealing with dynamics in the environment and problem domain, has led the
software engineering, distributed systems, and management communities to look for inspiration in
diverse fields (e.g., complex systems, control theory, artificial intelligence, sociology, and
biology) to find new ways of designing and managing such computing systems. In this endeavor,
self-organization and self-adaptation have emerged as two promising interrelated approaches. They
form the basis for many other self-* properties, such as self-configuration, self-healing, or
self-optimization. Systems exhibiting such properties are often referred to as self-* systems. 
(Continue reading)

dan | 23 Jan 02:43 2016

LANGSEC Workshop #3 deadline approaching

http://spw16.langsec.org/

The Third Workshop on Language-Theoretic Security (LangSec) at the
IEEE CS Security & Privacy Workshops solicits contributions related
to the growing area of language-theoretic security.

LangSec's goal is to provide the strongest defense for connected
software and hardware, expressed as a practical design methodology
for handling hostile inputs. LangSec offers a coherent computer
science explanation for the current "epidemic of insecurity" and
imposes an easy-to-understand structure on the seemingly ad hoc
collection of software mistakes or design flaws. This explanation
is predicated on the connection between fundamental computability
principles and the continued recurrence of software flaws despite
numerous and diverse secure programming initiatives.

LangSec posits that the only path to trustworthy software that
safely handles untrusted inputs is treating all valid or expected
inputs as a formal language and treating the respective input-handling
routines as a recognizer for that language.

However, far from being an "Ivory Tower" theory, the LangSec approach
to systems design is primarily concerned with achieving practical
assurance: development that is rooted in fundamentally sound theory,
but is expressed in efficient and practical tools for building
software. One major objective of the workshop is to develop and
share this viewpoint with attendees and the broader systems security
community, to help establish a foundation for research based on
LangSec principles.

(Continue reading)

Jonathan Edwards | 20 Jan 22:45 2016
Picon
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Gravatar

The future of the Future Programming Workshop

Hi,

We're thinking of making FPW a standalone event this year instead of colocating with other conferences. We're also inviting suggestions about refocusing the event to be of most use to the community of researchers and explorers. I've made a mailing list for future announcements about FPW.

Cheers,
Jonathan
<div><div dir="ltr">Hi,<div><br></div>
<div>We're thinking of making <a href="http://www.future-programming.org/">FPW</a> a standalone event this year instead of colocating with other conferences. We're also inviting suggestions about refocusing the event to be of most use to the community of researchers and explorers. I've made a <a href="http://tinyletter.com/futureprogramming">mailing list</a> for future announcements about FPW.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Cheers,</div>
<div>Jonathan</div>
</div></div>
José María Conejero | 4 Jan 22:39 2016
Picon

Modularity'16 - Student Research Competition Deadline Approaching

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
We apologize if you receive multiple copies of this CFP 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

*** MODULARITY '16 ***
15th International Conference on Modularity
University of Málaga, Spain 
14-17 March 2016

Call for Student Research Competition at Modularity 2016

# Quick Facts and Important Dates
Submission: 2016-01-19 (anywhere on earth) 
Notification: 2016-02-09
Camera-ready copy: 2016-02-19 (anywhere on earth)  

# About the Modularity 2016 Student Research Competition
Modularity 2016 will host an [ACM Student Research Competition (SRC)](http://src.acm.org/) The ACM competition — sponsored by Microsoft Research — recognizes and rewards outstanding student research. It wants to enable students to meet with experienced researchers of their field and share their research. The SRC is also intended as an opportunity for students to improve their presentation and communication skills. Students can receive feedback from distinguished judges from industry and academia.

# Prizes
The top three winners in each category (undergraduate and graduate) will be recognized during the conference banquet and will receive prizes of US $500, US $300, and US $200, respectively. The winners of the Modularity 2016 SRC are invited to compete with winners from other conferences in the ACM Student Research Competition Grand Finals.

Accepted research abstracts will be published in the Modularity 2016 companion.

# Participation
The competition requires the submission of abstracts. There are separate categories for undergraduate and graduate research. Undergraduate research may be to the undergraduate category even if the student is a first-year graduate student at the time of the conference.

# Research Abstract
Submit a research abstract of up to 800 words within the topic area of Modularity 2016 describing the research problem, motivation, background, related work, approach and uniqueness, results, and the contributions. It must be original work that is neither in submission nor already published at this or another conference or journal. Do not list supervisors of the work as co-authors, submit a single-authored work only. Please submit a **plain text** abstract to the submission system at [EasyChair https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016](https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016)

The abstracts are reviewed by a panel of experts, and are evaluated based on the quality of work, novelty of the approach, significance of the contributions and the clarity of writing. Note that submissions will be simultaneously considered as poster submissions. Students who are not selected to participate in the SRC will be considered for the poster event.

# First Round: Present a Poster
For each accepted abstract, the author is invited to present a poster. Judges will review the posters and speak to participants about their research. They will evaluate the research (quality, novelty, and significance) and the presentation of their research (poster, discussion) and select students to advance to the second round of the competition.

# Second Round — Give a Presentation
Selected students from the first round will give a short presentation of their research with questions and answers before a panel of judges who evaluate the presenter’s knowledge of their research area, contribution of the research, and the quality of the oral and visual presentation. Three winners will be chosen in each category, undergraduate and graduate, and receive prizes.

# Requirements
Participants must be undergraduate or graduate students pursuing an academic degree at the time of initial submission. To receive the travel stipend support funding, participants must be student members of the ACM, and must provide their ACM member number. Do not list supervisors of the work as co-authors, submit a single-authored work only.

# Student Support
Students selected for the SRC posters session are entitled to a travel expense stipend, up to a maximum of US $500, given they are ACM members at that time.

# Contact
For all further questions feel free to contact the Student Event Co-Chairs:

Tobias Pape and Henrique Rebêlo src-Ney8xQz2X9VICpAzduQ4Hg@public.gmane.org

For more information about the ACM SRC, please visit the [FAQ](src.acm.org/faqs.html).

The ACM Student Research Competition is sponsored by Microsoft Research.

________________________________________________________________

José María Conejero Manzano
Quercus Software Engineering Group.
Assistant Professor, Universidad de Extremadura
Escuela Politécnica, Avda. de la Universidad, s/n. 10071 - Cáceres (Spain)
(  +34 927 257 100 (ext. 57563)
+34 927 257 202
chemacm-k+YKPWu6GLE@public.gmane.org  
________________________________________________________________


<div><div dir="ltr">
<div>
<div>-------------------------------------------------------------------------</div>
<div>We apologize if you receive multiple copies of this CFP&nbsp;</div>
<div>-------------------------------------------------------------------------</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>
<div>*** MODULARITY '16 ***</div>
<div>
<span>15th International Conference on Modularity</span><br>
</div>
<div>
<span>University of M&aacute;laga, Spain&nbsp;</span><br>
</div>
<div>14-17 March 2016</div>
<div>
<span><a href="http://2016.modularity.info/track/src">http://2016.modularity.info/track/src</a></span><br>
</div>
<div><br></div>
</div>
<div>
<span>Call for Student Research Competition at Modularity 2016</span><br>
</div>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># Quick Facts and Important Dates</div>
<div>Submission: 2016-01-19 (anywhere on earth)&nbsp;</div>
<div>Notification: 2016-02-09</div>
<div>Camera-ready copy: 2016-02-19 (anywhere on earth) &nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># About the Modularity 2016 Student Research Competition</div>
<div>Modularity 2016 will host an [ACM Student Research Competition (SRC)](<a href="http://src.acm.org/" target="_blank">http://src.acm.org/</a>) The ACM competition &mdash; sponsored by Microsoft Research &mdash; recognizes and rewards outstanding student research. It wants to enable students to meet with experienced researchers of their field and share their research. The SRC is also intended as an opportunity for students to improve their presentation and communication skills. Students can receive feedback from distinguished judges from industry and academia.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># Prizes</div>
<div>The top three winners in each category (undergraduate and graduate) will be recognized during the conference banquet and will receive prizes of US $500, US $300, and US $200, respectively. The winners of the Modularity 2016 SRC are invited to compete with winners from other conferences in the ACM Student Research Competition Grand Finals.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Accepted research abstracts will be published in the Modularity 2016 companion.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># Participation</div>
<div>The competition requires the submission of abstracts. There are separate categories for undergraduate and graduate research. Undergraduate research may be to the undergraduate category even if the student is a first-year graduate student at the time of the conference.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># Research Abstract</div>
<div>Submit a research abstract of up to 800 words within the topic area of Modularity 2016 describing the research problem, motivation, background, related work, approach and uniqueness, results, and the contributions. It must be original work that is neither in submission nor already published at this or another conference or journal. Do not list supervisors of the work as co-authors, submit a single-authored work only. Please submit a **plain text** abstract to the submission system at [EasyChair&nbsp;<a href="https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016%5D(https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016)" target="_blank">https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016](https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016)</a>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>The abstracts are reviewed by a panel of experts, and are evaluated based on the quality of work, novelty of the approach, significance of the contributions and the clarity of writing. Note that submissions will be simultaneously considered as poster submissions. Students who are not selected to participate in the SRC will be considered for the poster event.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># First Round: Present a Poster</div>
<div>For each accepted abstract, the author is invited to present a poster. Judges will review the posters and speak to participants about their research. They will evaluate the research (quality, novelty, and significance) and the presentation of their research (poster, discussion) and select students to advance to the second round of the competition.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># Second Round &mdash; Give a Presentation</div>
<div>Selected students from the first round will give a short presentation of their research with questions and answers before a panel of judges who evaluate the presenter&rsquo;s knowledge of their research area, contribution of the research, and the quality of the oral and visual presentation. Three winners will be chosen in each category, undergraduate and graduate, and receive prizes.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># Requirements</div>
<div>Participants must be undergraduate or graduate students pursuing an academic degree at the time of initial submission. To receive the travel stipend support funding, participants must be student members of the ACM, and must provide their ACM member number. Do not list supervisors of the work as co-authors, submit a single-authored work only.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># Student Support</div>
<div>Students selected for the SRC posters session are entitled to a travel expense stipend, up to a maximum of US $500, given they are ACM members at that time.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div># Contact</div>
<div>For all further questions feel free to contact the Student Event Co-Chairs:</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Tobias Pape and Henrique Rebe&#770;lo&nbsp;<a href="mailto:src@..." target="_blank">src@...</a>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>For more information about the ACM SRC, please visit the [FAQ](<a href="http://src.acm.org/faqs.html" target="_blank">src.acm.org/faqs.html</a>).</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>The ACM Student Research Competition is sponsored by Microsoft Research.</div>
<div><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr">
<div><p><span>________________________________________________________________</span><br></p></div>Jos&eacute; Mar&iacute;a Conejero Manzano<br>Quercus Software Engineering Group.<br>Assistant Professor, Universidad de Extremadura<br>Escuela Polit&eacute;cnica, Avda. de la Universidad, s/n.&nbsp;10071 - C&aacute;ceres (Spain)<br><span>(</span>&nbsp; +34 927 257 100 (ext. 57563)<br><div>
<span>7&nbsp;</span>+34 927 257 202<br><span>*&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:chemacm@..." target="_blank">chemacm@...</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;</div>
<div>
<a href="http://about.me/chemacm" target="_blank"></a>&nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="http://about.me/chemacm" target="_blank">http://about.me/chemacm</a>
</div>
<div><div>________________________________________________________________<br><br>
</div></div>
<div><br></div>
</div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
<div dir="ltr"></div>
</div></div>
Oleg Sivokon | 21 Dec 00:42 2015
Picon

Compiling Jolt on 64-bit Linux

Hello list!

I thought that the ideas and the initiative of the project are very
interesting.  In particular, I wanted to have a closer look at OMeta,
JOHN and IS programs.  I've found this repository:
http://piumarta.com/svn2/idst/trunk and tried to build the sources, but
am not able to due to:

[...]
rm -f CodeGenerator-local.st
cp -p CodeGenerator-x86_64.st CodeGenerator-local.st
cp: cannot stat ‘CodeGenerator-x86_64.st’: No such file or directory
Makefile:51: recipe for target 'CodeGenerator-local.st' failed
make[2]: *** [CodeGenerator-local.st] Error 1
make[2]: Leaving directory
'/home/wvxvw/Projects/idst/function/jolt-burg'
[...]

My understanding is that *.st are source files, but they are generated
during the build by the recipe jolt.a:

jolt.a : $(FILES) ../objects/objects.a
	ar rcs $ <at> .new $(FILES) ../objects/*.o
	mv $ <at> .new $ <at> 

due to $FILES matching the recipe %$(OBJEXT_O):

%$(OBJEXT_O) : %.st
	$(IDC) $(IDFLAGS) -c $< -o $ <at> 

Though I don't quite undersand why would it generate all but
CodeGenerator-x86_64.st (or why does it generate other architectures,
just not the x86_64)?  Can it generate one?  Also, it looks like the
last commit to the project was made nine years ago.  Is this indeed the
latest version?  If so, was there any reason to stop working on it?

Best.

Oleg

_______________________________________________
Fonc mailing list
Fonc <at> mailman.vpri.org
http://mailman.vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc_mailman.vpri.org
José María Conejero | 20 Nov 16:40 2015
Picon

Modularity'16 - Call for Demonstrations and Posters

-------------------------------------------------
Call for Demonstrations and Posters
-------------------------------------------------

*** MODULARITY '16 ***
15th International Conference on Modularity
March 14-17, 2016
Málaga, Spain

Important dates
---------------------
Submission: January 11, 2016 
Notification: February 1, 2016  

Demonstrations
----------------------
Modularity’16 solicits high-quality proposals for its demonstration track. Demonstrations may present work in progress systems, commercial or in-house applications, proofs of concept, results of academic or industrial research, or any other innovative software tools or systems.

The Demonstrations track is an excellent vehicle for sharing your latest work with a knowledgeable and experienced audience. Demo session is a rare opportunity to showcase your most recent work, explain its relevance, and get feedback on the technical aspects of the running applications in a highly interactive setting. Presenters receive a multi-faceted feedback from the audience, while the audience learns about the relevant emerging technologies and engages with its developers. This is also an opportunity to increase the visibility and impact of your work.

Selection Process:
Demonstrations will be selected on the basis of technical merit, novelty, relevance to the modularity and composition community, and feasibility of presentation. The presentation has to focus on technical content and is to be given by technical members of the development team.

Each accepted demo will be allocated 30 minutes. We recommend to use this time for presentation (5-10 min.) of the research ideas on which the tools are based; actual demonstration (15 min.); and allow at least 5-to-10 minutes for questions and discussion.

Authors of research and workshop papers are also welcome to submit an accompanying demonstration.

Demonstration Topics:
The demonstration track welcomes any submission within the scope of the topics of interest of the main conference, including (though are not limited to):
 - applications of mechanisms to support modularity and composition throughout the software development life-cycle;
 - new technologies for software modularization and composition;
 - linguistic mechanism to support modularity and composition;
 - modularity in domain specific languages design, implementation and application;
 - composable and reusable libraries of programming entities.

Demonstration Proposal Must Include:
 - Title
 - Name, email, address, and phone number of the intended presenters
 - Abstract (up to 200 words) for advertising the demonstration on the conference web site
 - A description of the demonstration that highlights the problems addressed, innovations (e.g., uniqueness of design and implementation), impact, and relation of this work to other industrial or research efforts

The demo submission must not exceed 4 pages (in the ACM sigplanconf 10pt format, similar to main conference submissions). If the demo is accepted, this paper will be included in the conference companion proceedings.

Additionally, we strongly encourage submission of a short summative youtube movie for the demo (3-5 min. long) with the link included into the demo paper. If the movie is not submitted, 3-5 screenshots should be submitted to accompany the submission (but not to be included into proceedings). The screenshots are not part of the demo paper and are in addition to the 4-pages of the paper

Demonstrations should be submitted in pdf and must not exceed four pages (excluding screenshots).

Any special requirements for the demonstration (e.g., non-standard equipment, or a wired network connection, etc.) must also be communicated at submission time.

Posters
----------
Poster event provides an excellent forum for authors to present their recent or ongoing work in an interactive setting, and receive feedback from the community. The goal of the poster session is to encourage and facilitate a one-to-one and small group discussions on a technical topic. It is used to showcase the very new work, clarify problem statements, vet solutions, identify evaluation methods and, (for students) to practice presentation of own work to peers.

Poster Submission Guidelines:
A poster submission should include the following two files in PDF format:

A poster preview (ISO A1 Portrait printout)
A 2 pages extended abstract (in the ACM sigplanconf 10pt format), containing:
 - the poster title;
 - names and affiliations of the authors (one of whom should be named as a contact person);
 - motivation and the addressed problem, proposed solution, its’ the novel contributions of the given proposal and the context of its related work.

Posters shall be evaluated both on their contributions and on how effectively they communicate those contributions.

If accepted, this paper will be included in the conference companion proceedings.

Poster author(s) are required to attend the scheduled poster session, staying with their poster so that they can discuss their work with conference attendees. Each poster will have an associated sign-up sheet where poster authors will note their availability for additional one-to-one discussions, which will allow interested viewers to obtain further information. Additionally, each poster-board will have a message area, on which viewers can post comments, ideas, and questions and on which poster authors will be able to post responses.

How to submit:
Demonstration and posters are to be submitted electronically to EasyChair ( https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=modularity2016-demos ).

Demonstration and Poster Chair:
Ruzanna Chitchyan, University of Leicester, UK

Selection Committee:
Walter Cazzola, University of Milano, IT
Franck Fleurey, SINTEF, Norway
Iris Groher: Johannes Kepler University, Austria
Reiko Heckel, University of Leicester, UK
Raffi Khachadourian, New York City College of Technology, City University of New York, USA
Gunter Mussbacher, McGill University, Canada
Claudio Sant’Anna, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil

For More Information:
For additional information, clarification, or answers to questions please contact the Demonstration and Poster Chair, Ruzanna Chitchyan, at demos-Ney8xQz2X9VICpAzduQ4Hg@public.gmane.org

________________________________________________________________

José María Conejero Manzano
Quercus Software Engineering Group.
Assistant Professor, Universidad de Extremadura
Escuela Politécnica, Avda. de la Universidad, s/n. 10071 - Cáceres (Spain)
(  +34 927 257 100 (ext. 57563)
+34 927 257 202
chemacm-k+YKPWu6GLE@public.gmane.org  
________________________________________________________________


<div><div dir="ltr">
<div>-------------------------------------------------</div>
<div>Call for Demonstrations and Posters</div>
<div>-------------------------------------------------</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>*** MODULARITY '16 ***</div>
<div>15th International Conference on Modularity</div>
<div>March 14-17, 2016</div>
<div>M&aacute;laga, Spain</div>
<div>
<a href="http://2016.modularity.info/track/modularity-2016-demos">http://2016.modularity.info/track/modularity-2016-demos</a> &nbsp;&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Important dates</div>
<div>---------------------</div>
<div>Submission: January 11, 2016&nbsp;</div>
<div>Notification: February 1, 2016 &nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Demonstrations</div>
<div>----------------------</div>
<div>Modularity&rsquo;16 solicits high-quality proposals for its demonstration track. Demonstrations may present work in progress systems, commercial or in-house applications, proofs of concept, results of academic or industrial research, or any other innovative software tools or systems.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>The Demonstrations track is an excellent vehicle for sharing your latest work with a knowledgeable and experienced audience. Demo session is a rare opportunity to showcase your most recent work, explain its relevance, and get feedback on the technical aspects of the running applications in a highly interactive setting. Presenters receive a multi-faceted feedback from the audience, while the audience learns about the relevant emerging technologies and engages with its developers. This is also an opportunity to increase the visibility and impact of your work.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Selection Process:</div>
<div>Demonstrations will be selected on the basis of technical merit, novelty, relevance to the modularity and composition community, and feasibility of presentation. The presentation has to focus on technical content and is to be given by technical members of the development team.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Each accepted demo will be allocated 30 minutes. We recommend to use this time for presentation (5-10 min.) of the research ideas on which the tools are based; actual demonstration (15 min.); and allow at least 5-to-10 minutes for questions and discussion.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Authors of research and workshop papers are also welcome to submit an accompanying demonstration.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Demonstration Topics:</div>
<div>The demonstration track welcomes any submission within the scope of the topics of interest of the main conference, including (though are not limited to):</div>
<div>&nbsp;- applications of mechanisms to support modularity and composition throughout the software development life-cycle;</div>
<div>&nbsp;- new technologies for software modularization and composition;</div>
<div>&nbsp;- linguistic mechanism to support modularity and composition;</div>
<div>&nbsp;- modularity in domain specific languages design, implementation and application;</div>
<div>&nbsp;- composable and reusable libraries of programming entities.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Demonstration Proposal Must Include:</div>
<div>&nbsp;- Title</div>
<div>&nbsp;- Name, email, address, and phone number of the intended presenters</div>
<div>&nbsp;- Abstract (up to 200 words) for advertising the demonstration on the conference web site</div>
<div>&nbsp;- A description of the demonstration that highlights the problems addressed, innovations (e.g., uniqueness of design and implementation), impact, and relation of this work to other industrial or research efforts</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>The demo submission must not exceed 4 pages (in the ACM sigplanconf 10pt format, similar to main conference submissions). If the demo is accepted, this paper will be included in the conference companion proceedings.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Additionally, we strongly encourage submission of a short summative youtube movie for the demo (3-5 min. long) with the link included into the demo paper. If the movie is not submitted, 3-5 screenshots should be submitted to accompany the submission (but not to be included into proceedings). The screenshots are not part of the demo paper and are in addition to the 4-pages of the paper</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Demonstrations should be submitted in pdf and must not exceed four pages (excluding screenshots).</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Any special requirements for the demonstration (e.g., non-standard equipment, or a wired network connection, etc.) must also be communicated at submission time.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Posters</div>
<div>----------</div>
<div>Poster event provides an excellent forum for authors to present their recent or ongoing work in an interactive setting, and receive feedback from the community. The goal of the poster session is to encourage and facilitate a one-to-one and small group discussions on a technical topic. It is used to showcase the very new work, clarify problem statements, vet solutions, identify evaluation methods and, (for students) to practice presentation of own work to peers.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Poster Submission Guidelines:</div>
<div>A poster submission should include the following two files in PDF format:</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>A poster preview (ISO A1 Portrait printout)</div>
<div>A 2 pages extended abstract (in the ACM sigplanconf 10pt format), containing:</div>
<div>&nbsp;- the poster title;</div>
<div>&nbsp;- names and affiliations of the authors (one of whom should be named as a contact person);</div>
<div>&nbsp;- motivation and the addressed problem, proposed solution, its&rsquo; the novel contributions of the given proposal and the context of its related work.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Posters shall be evaluated both on their contributions and on how effectively they communicate those contributions.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>If accepted, this paper will be included in the conference companion proceedings.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Poster author(s) are required to attend the scheduled poster session, staying with their poster so that they can discuss their work with conference attendees. Each poster will have an associated sign-up sheet where poster authors will note their availability for additional one-to-one discussions, which will allow interested viewers to obtain further information. Additionally, each poster-board will have a message area, on which viewers can post comments, ideas, and questions and on which poster authors will be able to post responses.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>How to submit:</div>
<div>Demonstration and posters are to be submitted electronically to EasyChair ( <a href="https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=modularity2016-demos">https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=modularity2016-demos</a> ).</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Demonstration and Poster Chair:</div>
<div>Ruzanna Chitchyan, University of Leicester, UK</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Selection Committee:</div>
<div>Walter Cazzola, University of Milano, IT</div>
<div>Franck Fleurey, SINTEF, Norway</div>
<div>Iris Groher: Johannes Kepler University, Austria</div>
<div>Reiko Heckel, University of Leicester, UK</div>
<div>Raffi Khachadourian, New York City College of Technology, City University of New York, USA</div>
<div>Gunter Mussbacher, McGill University, Canada</div>
<div>Claudio Sant&rsquo;Anna, Federal University of Bahia, Brazil</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>For More Information:</div>
<div>For additional information, clarification, or answers to questions please contact the Demonstration and Poster Chair, Ruzanna Chitchyan, at <a href="mailto:demos@...">demos@...</a>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr">
<div><p><span>________________________________________________________________</span><br></p></div>Jos&eacute; Mar&iacute;a Conejero Manzano<br>Quercus Software Engineering Group.<br>Assistant Professor, Universidad de Extremadura<br>Escuela Polit&eacute;cnica, Avda. de la Universidad, s/n.&nbsp;10071 - C&aacute;ceres (Spain)<br><span>(</span>&nbsp; +34 927 257 100 (ext. 57563)<br><div>
<span>7&nbsp;</span>+34 927 257 202<br><span>*&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:chemacm@..." target="_blank">chemacm@...</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;</div>
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<div><div>________________________________________________________________<br><br>
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<div><br></div>
</div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
</div></div>
José María Conejero | 18 Nov 19:34 2015
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Call for Student Research Competition at Modularity 2016

-------------------------------------------------------------------------
We apologize if you receive multiple copies of this CFP 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Call for Student Research Competition at Modularity 2016

# Quick Facts and Important Dates
Submission: 2016-01-19 (anywhere on earth) 
Notification: 2016-02-09
Camera-ready copy: 2016-02-19 (anywhere on earth)  

# About the Modularity 2016 Student Research Competition
Modularity 2016 will host an [ACM Student Research Competition (SRC)](http://src.acm.org/) The ACM competition — sponsored by Microsoft Research — recognizes and rewards outstanding student research. It wants to enable students to meet with experienced researchers of their field and share their research. The SRC is also intended as an opportunity for students to improve their presentation and communication skills. Students can receive feedback from distinguished judges from industry and academia.

# Prizes
The top three winners in each category (undergraduate and graduate) will be recognized during the conference banquet and will receive prizes of US $500, US $300, and US $200, respectively. The winners of the Modularity 2016 SRC are invited to compete with winners from other conferences in the ACM Student Research Competition Grand Finals.

Accepted research abstracts will be published in the Modularity 2016 companion.

# Participation
The competition requires the submission of abstracts. There are separate categories for undergraduate and graduate research. Undergraduate research may be to the undergraduate category even if the student is a first-year graduate student at the time of the conference.

# Research Abstract
Submit a research abstract of up to 800 words within the topic area of Modularity 2016 describing the research problem, motivation, background, related work, approach and uniqueness, results, and the contributions. It must be original work that is neither in submission nor already published at this or another conference or journal. Do not list supervisors of the work as co-authors, submit a single-authored work only. Please submit a **plain text** abstract to the submission system at [EasyChair https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016](https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016)

The abstracts are reviewed by a panel of experts, and are evaluated based on the quality of work, novelty of the approach, significance of the contributions and the clarity of writing. Note that submissions will be simultaneously considered as poster submissions. Students who are not selected to participate in the SRC will be considered for the poster event.

# First Round: Present a Poster
For each accepted abstract, the author is invited to present a poster. Judges will review the posters and speak to participants about their research. They will evaluate the research (quality, novelty, and significance) and the presentation of their research (poster, discussion) and select students to advance to the second round of the competition.

# Second Round — Give a Presentation
Selected students from the first round will give a short presentation of their research with questions and answers before a panel of judges who evaluate the presenter’s knowledge of their research area, contribution of the research, and the quality of the oral and visual presentation. Three winners will be chosen in each category, undergraduate and graduate, and receive prizes.

# Requirements
Participants must be undergraduate or graduate students pursuing an academic degree at the time of initial submission. To receive the travel stipend support funding, participants must be student members of the ACM, and must provide their ACM member number. Do not list supervisors of the work as co-authors, submit a single-authored work only.

# Student Support
Students selected for the SRC posters session are entitled to a travel expense stipend, up to a maximum of US $500, given they are ACM members at that time.

# Contact
For all further questions feel free to contact the Student Event Co-Chairs:

Tobias Pape and Henrique Rebêlo  

For more information about the ACM SRC, please visit the [FAQ](src.acm.org/faqs.html).

The ACM Student Research Competition is sponsored by Microsoft Research.

________________________________________________________________

José María Conejero Manzano
Quercus Software Engineering Group.
Assistant Professor, Universidad de Extremadura
Escuela Politécnica, Avda. de la Universidad, s/n. 10071 - Cáceres (Spain)
(  +34 927 257 100 (ext. 57563)
+34 927 257 202
chemacm-k+YKPWu6GLE@public.gmane.org  
________________________________________________________________


<div><div dir="ltr">
<div class="gmail_signature">
<div>-------------------------------------------------------------------------</div>
<div>We apologize if you receive multiple copies of this CFP&nbsp;</div>
<div>-------------------------------------------------------------------------</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>
<span>Call for Student Research Competition at Modularity 2016</span><br>
</div>
</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># Quick Facts and Important Dates</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Submission: 2016-01-19 (anywhere on earth)&nbsp;</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Notification: 2016-02-09</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Camera-ready copy: 2016-02-19 (anywhere on earth) &nbsp;</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># About the Modularity 2016 Student Research Competition</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Modularity 2016 will host an [ACM Student Research Competition (SRC)](<a href="http://src.acm.org/">http://src.acm.org/</a>) The ACM competition &mdash; sponsored by Microsoft Research &mdash; recognizes and rewards outstanding student research. It wants to enable students to meet with experienced researchers of their field and share their research. The SRC is also intended as an opportunity for students to improve their presentation and communication skills. Students can receive feedback from distinguished judges from industry and academia.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># Prizes</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">The top three winners in each category (undergraduate and graduate) will be recognized during the conference banquet and will receive prizes of US $500, US $300, and US $200, respectively. The winners of the Modularity 2016 SRC are invited to compete with winners from other conferences in the ACM Student Research Competition Grand Finals.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Accepted research abstracts will be published in the Modularity 2016 companion.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># Participation</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">The competition requires the submission of abstracts. There are separate categories for undergraduate and graduate research. Undergraduate research may be to the undergraduate category even if the student is a first-year graduate student at the time of the conference.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># Research Abstract</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Submit a research abstract of up to 800 words within the topic area of Modularity 2016 describing the research problem, motivation, background, related work, approach and uniqueness, results, and the contributions. It must be original work that is neither in submission nor already published at this or another conference or journal. Do not list supervisors of the work as co-authors, submit a single-authored work only. Please submit a **plain text** abstract to the submission system at [EasyChair <a href="https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016%5D(https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016)">https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016](https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=srcmodularity2016)</a>
</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature">The abstracts are reviewed by a panel of experts, and are evaluated based on the quality of work, novelty of the approach, significance of the contributions and the clarity of writing. Note that submissions will be simultaneously considered as poster submissions. Students who are not selected to participate in the SRC will be considered for the poster event.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># First Round: Present a Poster</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">For each accepted abstract, the author is invited to present a poster. Judges will review the posters and speak to participants about their research. They will evaluate the research (quality, novelty, and significance) and the presentation of their research (poster, discussion) and select students to advance to the second round of the competition.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># Second Round &mdash; Give a Presentation</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Selected students from the first round will give a short presentation of their research with questions and answers before a panel of judges who evaluate the presenter&rsquo;s knowledge of their research area, contribution of the research, and the quality of the oral and visual presentation. Three winners will be chosen in each category, undergraduate and graduate, and receive prizes.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># Requirements</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Participants must be undergraduate or graduate students pursuing an academic degree at the time of initial submission. To receive the travel stipend support funding, participants must be student members of the ACM, and must provide their ACM member number. Do not list supervisors of the work as co-authors, submit a single-authored work only.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># Student Support</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Students selected for the SRC posters session are entitled to a travel expense stipend, up to a maximum of US $500, given they are ACM members at that time.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"># Contact</div>
<div class="gmail_signature">For all further questions feel free to contact the Student Event Co-Chairs:</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature">Tobias Pape and Henrique Rebe&#770;lo &nbsp;</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><a href="mailto:src@...">src@...</a></div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature">For more information about the ACM SRC, please visit the [FAQ](<a href="http://src.acm.org/faqs.html">src.acm.org/faqs.html</a>).</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div class="gmail_signature">The ACM Student Research Competition is sponsored by Microsoft Research.</div>
<div class="gmail_signature"><br></div>
<div><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr">
<div><p><span>________________________________________________________________</span><br></p></div>Jos&eacute; Mar&iacute;a Conejero Manzano<br>Quercus Software Engineering Group.<br>Assistant Professor, Universidad de Extremadura<br>Escuela Polit&eacute;cnica, Avda. de la Universidad, s/n.&nbsp;10071 - C&aacute;ceres (Spain)<br><span>(</span>&nbsp; +34 927 257 100 (ext. 57563)<br><div>
<span>7&nbsp;</span>+34 927 257 202<br><span>*&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:chemacm <at> unex.es" target="_blank">chemacm@...</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;</div>
<div>
<a href="http://about.me/chemacm" target="_blank"></a>&nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="http://about.me/chemacm" target="_blank">http://about.me/chemacm</a>
</div>
<div><div>________________________________________________________________<br><br>
</div></div>
<div><br></div>
</div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
</div></div>
John Carlson | 6 Nov 21:30 2015
Picon

Re: Syntax by example, polynomial time or NP-complete?

I think my problem now boils down to generating a JSON schema from several Java classes.  I was able to generate Java classes (I think) from concatenating all my JSON files together and running them through jsonschema2pojo.  There were some “duplicate” classes, but it looks manageable. 30 classes were generated and 13 were duplicates, so there are a total of 17 classes (this number seems small).  I will have to sort through the classes before generating the schema.  I am still looking for a tool that will generate the schema, but it looks like I can add multiple classes to the schema generating tools, but I haven't tried or seen it done yet.
 
On Nov 5, 2015, at 3:01 PM, Anthony Di Franco <di.franco-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org> wrote:

It's not yet clear to me from the discussion what exactly your problem is. In general, identifying recursive structure from data is a hard problem, and an underdetermined one. It's something I think I've got an approach to in the general case, but nothing you'd want to try if you are actually solving a simpler problem.
 If you want to do this in a practical setting, you will probably need to bring as much a priori constraint as you know of into the technique you develop.
Can you give a bit more background on the problem you're trying to solve so we can try to see a correspondence to some formal class of problems and its solution techniques? You mention regular expressions are involved somehow. Can you say what the context of this is?

On Wed, Nov 4, 2015 at 6:03 PM John Carlson <yottzumm-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org> wrote:
I am familiar with Grammex, but I want wondering if there’s been any more effort to create syntax by incremental example, given that validation tools are present (online, either getting feedback from a compiler, or ideally from an IDE with incremental compiling and code completion).  I think from reading about reverse engineering protocols that this might be polynomial time, whereas, without a validator (offline), it’s NP-complete?  Or is that only for regular grammars?  What about “syntax-free” languages, like machine code? Is this where the idea that it’s NP-complete came from? I’m actually interested in creating JSON schemas from thousands of example JSON files.  I want something more detailed than the JSON specification, with domain validation.
John
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<div>I think my problem now boils down to generating a JSON schema from several Java classes. &nbsp;I was able to generate Java classes (I think) from concatenating all my JSON files together and running them through&nbsp;<span class="">jsonschema2pojo. &nbsp;There were some&nbsp;&ldquo;duplicate&rdquo; classes, but it looks manageable. 30 classes were generated and 13 were duplicates, so there are a total of 17 classes&nbsp;(this number seems small). &nbsp;I will&nbsp;have to sort through the classes before generating the schema. &nbsp;I am still looking for a tool that will generate the schema, but it looks&nbsp;like I can add multiple classes to the schema generating tools, but I haven't tried or seen it done yet.</span><div class="">&nbsp;</div>
<div class="">On Nov 5, 2015, at 3:01 PM, Anthony Di Franco &lt;<a href="mailto:di.franco@..." class="">di.franco@...</a>&gt; wrote:<div><blockquote type="cite" class="">
<br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class="">
<div dir="ltr" class="">It's not yet clear to me from the discussion what exactly your problem is. In general, identifying recursive structure from data is a hard problem, and an underdetermined one.&nbsp;It's something I think I've got an approach to in the general case, but nothing you'd want to try if you are actually solving a simpler problem.<div class="">&nbsp;If you want to do this in a practical&nbsp;setting, you will probably need to bring as much a priori constraint as you know of into the technique you develop.<div class="">Can you give a bit more background on the problem you're trying to solve so we can try to see a correspondence to some formal class of problems and its solution techniques? You mention regular expressions are involved somehow. Can you say what the context of this is?<br class=""><br class=""><div class="gmail_quote">
<div dir="ltr" class="">On Wed, Nov 4, 2015 at 6:03 PM John Carlson &lt;<a href="mailto:yottzumm@..." class="">yottzumm@...</a>&gt; wrote:<br class="">
</div>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote">I am familiar with Grammex, but I want wondering if there&rsquo;s been any more effort to create syntax by incremental example, given that validation tools are present (online, either getting feedback from a compiler, or ideally from an IDE with incremental compiling and code completion).&nbsp; I think from reading about reverse engineering protocols that this might be polynomial time, whereas, without a validator (offline), it&rsquo;s NP-complete?&nbsp; Or is that only for regular grammars?&nbsp; What about &ldquo;syntax-free&rdquo; languages, like machine code? Is this where the idea that it&rsquo;s NP-complete came from? I&rsquo;m actually interested in creating JSON schemas from thousands of example JSON files.&nbsp; I want something more detailed than the JSON specification, with domain validation.<br class="">
John<br class="">
_______________________________________________<br class="">
Fonc mailing list<br class=""><a href="mailto:Fonc@..." target="_blank" class="">Fonc@...</a><br class=""><a href="http://mailman.vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc_mailman.vpri.org" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank" class="">http://mailman.vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc_mailman.vpri.org</a><br class="">
</blockquote>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</blockquote></div>
<br class="">
</div>
</div>
John Carlson | 5 Nov 22:51 2015
Picon

Re: Syntax by example, polynomial time or NP-complete?

Okay, I didn’t realize that people were that interested.   We are translating VRML/X3D examples to JSON which contain nested transforms and we don’t have ways of validating the JSON beyond jslint, json parse, and jsonlint or converting to back to XML.  I would like to add higher level validation like what exists for XML, Schemas and Schematron (rules).  JSON schema seems like the next step among many.  Ultimately, we want to validate JSON which did not come from XML, but is translatable to XML, we hope.  Right now, the regular expressions (number patterns, enums) found in XML Schema are not being converted to JSON schema (and the regular expression languages may be different) with the Jsonix schema compiler.  The Jsonix schema compiler (JAXB and Jackson I think) so far seems to be the best way to create JSON schema, but we haven’t tried to verify our JSON standard examples against it.  Our JSON, generated with XSLT, contains special prefixes  ( <at> ,#,-) for identifying attributes, comments and arrays.  We have converted our XML to JSON with Jsonix and validated that. We’re also looking into converting XML Schema -> OWL -> JSON schema. Since we have prefixes not in the original schemas, an instances to schema approach seems appropriate, or we will have to hand modify the JSON Schema produced by some tool based on XML to add prefixes.  So we are looking for a good incremental or batch tool that works on JSON and JSON schema.

For the recursive part, I believe that Group elements and Transform elements can be co-nested in any combination.  Then there are elements below that and above that.  There are likely other areas of the spec that are like that, but those are the main two that would handle a lot of cases.

I am extending this problem out more generally, such as automated or incremental schema/ontology/model/database development to see if there’s some correspondence I can leverage.  I am talking to the Model Transformation By Demonstration folks about their process and if it can handle recursion, or somehow make their process recursive or stack driven.


I’d like to see a JSON version of all three of these. JSON documents in a zip: https://github.com/coderextreme/x3djson/blob/master/X3DJSON.zip?raw=true

We cannot use any software you develop unless it is royalty-free.  Pointer to papers are welcome, but I have trouble reading PDFs.  Email/Conversation is better for me.  If you like, I cat set up a Google Hangout or Skype session to discuss.

John
On Nov 5, 2015, at 3:01 PM, Anthony Di Franco <di.franco-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org> wrote:

It's not yet clear to me from the discussion what exactly your problem is. In general, identifying recursive structure from data is a hard problem, and an underdetermined one. It's something I think I've got an approach to in the general case, but nothing you'd want to try if you are actually solving a simpler problem.
 If you want to do this in a practical setting, you will probably need to bring as much a priori constraint as you know of into the technique you develop.
Can you give a bit more background on the problem you're trying to solve so we can try to see a correspondence to some formal class of problems and its solution techniques? You mention regular expressions are involved somehow. Can you say what the context of this is?

On Wed, Nov 4, 2015 at 6:03 PM John Carlson <yottzumm-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org> wrote:
I am familiar with Grammex, but I want wondering if there’s been any more effort to create syntax by incremental example, given that validation tools are present (online, either getting feedback from a compiler, or ideally from an IDE with incremental compiling and code completion).  I think from reading about reverse engineering protocols that this might be polynomial time, whereas, without a validator (offline), it’s NP-complete?  Or is that only for regular grammars?  What about “syntax-free” languages, like machine code? Is this where the idea that it’s NP-complete came from? I’m actually interested in creating JSON schemas from thousands of example JSON files.  I want something more detailed than the JSON specification, with domain validation.
John
_______________________________________________
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Fonc-xGejAJT2w6y5VyjuQBxIBA@public.gmane.org
http://mailman.vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc_mailman.vpri.org

<div>Okay, I didn&rsquo;t realize that people were that interested. &nbsp; We are translating VRML/X3D examples to JSON which contain nested transforms and we don&rsquo;t have ways of validating the JSON beyond jslint, json parse, and jsonlint or converting to back to XML. &nbsp;I would like to add higher level validation like what exists for XML, Schemas and Schematron (rules). &nbsp;JSON schema seems like the next step among many. &nbsp;Ultimately, we want to validate JSON which did not come from XML, but is translatable to XML, we hope. &nbsp;Right now, the regular expressions (number patterns, enums) found in XML Schema are not being converted to JSON schema (and the regular expression languages may be different) with the Jsonix schema compiler. &nbsp;The Jsonix schema compiler (JAXB and Jackson I think) so far seems to be the best way to create JSON schema, but we haven&rsquo;t tried to verify our JSON standard examples against it. &nbsp;Our JSON, generated with XSLT, contains special prefixes&nbsp;&nbsp;( <at> ,#,-) for identifying attributes, comments and arrays. &nbsp;We have converted our XML to JSON with Jsonix and validated that. We&rsquo;re also looking into converting XML Schema -&gt; OWL -&gt; JSON schema. Since we have prefixes not in the original schemas, an instances to schema approach seems appropriate, or we will have to hand modify the JSON Schema produced by some tool based on XML to add prefixes. &nbsp;So we are looking for a good incremental or batch tool that works on JSON and JSON schema.<div class=""><br class=""></div>
<div class="">For the recursive part, I believe that Group elements and Transform elements can be co-nested in any combination. &nbsp;Then there are elements below that and above that. &nbsp;There are likely other areas of the spec that are like that, but those are the main two that would handle a lot of cases.</div>
<div class=""><br class=""></div>
<div class="">I am extending this problem out more generally, such as automated or incremental schema/ontology/model/database development to see if there&rsquo;s some correspondence I can leverage. &nbsp;I am talking to the Model Transformation By Demonstration folks about their process and if it can handle recursion, or somehow make their process recursive or stack driven.</div>
<div class=""><br class=""></div>
<div class="">XML Schema is here: &nbsp;<span class=""><a href="http://www.web3d.org/specifications/x3d-3.4.xsd" class="">http://www.web3d.org/specifications/x3d-3.4.xsd</a> XML Schematron is here:&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.web3d.org/x3d/tools/schematron/X3dSchematronValidityChecks.sch" class="">http://www.web3d.org/x3d/tools/schematron/X3dSchematronValidityChecks.sch</a>&nbsp;and here:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.web3d.org/x3d/tools/schematron/X3dSchematronValidityChecks2.sch" class="">http://www.web3d.org/x3d/tools/schematron/X3dSchematronValidityChecks2.sch</a>
</div>
<div class=""><br class=""></div>
<div class="">I&rsquo;d like to see a JSON version of all three of these. JSON documents in a zip:&nbsp;<a href="https://github.com/coderextreme/x3djson/blob/master/X3DJSON.zip?raw=true" class="">https://github.com/coderextreme/x3djson/blob/master/X3DJSON.zip?raw=true</a>
</div>
<div class=""><br class=""></div>
<div class="">We cannot use any software you develop unless it is royalty-free. &nbsp;Pointer to papers are welcome, but I have trouble reading PDFs. &nbsp;Email/Conversation is better for me. &nbsp;If you like, I cat set up a Google Hangout or Skype session to discuss.</div>
<div class=""><br class=""></div>
<div class="">John<div class="">
<div><blockquote type="cite" class="">
<div class="">On Nov 5, 2015, at 3:01 PM, Anthony Di Franco &lt;<a href="mailto:di.franco@..." class="">di.franco@...</a>&gt; wrote:</div>
<br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><div class="">
<div dir="ltr" class="">It's not yet clear to me from the discussion what exactly your problem is. In general, identifying recursive structure from data is a hard problem, and an underdetermined one.&nbsp;It's something I think I've got an approach to in the general case, but nothing you'd want to try if you are actually solving a simpler problem.<div class="">&nbsp;If you want to do this in a practical&nbsp;setting, you will probably need to bring as much a priori constraint as you know of into the technique you develop.<div class="">Can you give a bit more background on the problem you're trying to solve so we can try to see a correspondence to some formal class of problems and its solution techniques? You mention regular expressions are involved somehow. Can you say what the context of this is?<br class=""><br class=""><div class="gmail_quote">
<div dir="ltr" class="">On Wed, Nov 4, 2015 at 6:03 PM John Carlson &lt;<a href="mailto:yottzumm@..." class="">yottzumm@...</a>&gt; wrote:<br class="">
</div>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote">I am familiar with Grammex, but I want wondering if there&rsquo;s been any more effort to create syntax by incremental example, given that validation tools are present (online, either getting feedback from a compiler, or ideally from an IDE with incremental compiling and code completion).&nbsp; I think from reading about reverse engineering protocols that this might be polynomial time, whereas, without a validator (offline), it&rsquo;s NP-complete?&nbsp; Or is that only for regular grammars?&nbsp; What about &ldquo;syntax-free&rdquo; languages, like machine code? Is this where the idea that it&rsquo;s NP-complete came from? I&rsquo;m actually interested in creating JSON schemas from thousands of example JSON files.&nbsp; I want something more detailed than the JSON specification, with domain validation.<br class="">
John<br class="">
_______________________________________________<br class="">
Fonc mailing list<br class=""><a href="mailto:Fonc@..." target="_blank" class="">Fonc@...</a><br class=""><a href="http://mailman.vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc_mailman.vpri.org" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank" class="">http://mailman.vpri.org/mailman/listinfo/fonc_mailman.vpri.org</a><br class="">
</blockquote>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</div>
</blockquote></div>
<br class="">
</div>
</div>
</div>
Anthony Di Franco | 25 Oct 02:25 2015
Picon

Talk Monday 26th, San Francisco

Hi all,
 Sorry about the late notice, but it very recently occurred to me that this would be a good group to invite feedback from on a talk I'm giving this coming Monday on approximate search techniques for problems in programming languages. It's my attempt to describe for the programming language community the broader agenda from this talk I gave last month, which covered, I suppose I could say, the intersection of nondeterminism and computation in a very broad interdisciplinary way. To help me with this shift in perspective, I could use some feedback on whether this makes sense and how I might improve the focus, either before the talk or after. What I'm trying to move towards is, in one sense, a generalization of constraint solving to arbitrary recursive relationships potentially involving uncertainty, so there's a lot of overlap in the applications with VPRI-like work and goals, such as declarative UI, better, easier parsing, and Hesam Samimi's PlanB, for example.

Hope to see some of you there or otherwise hear your thoughts. Here's the info: http://www.meetup.com/SF-Types-Theorems-and-Programming-Languages/events/226067416/

Finally Fifth? Searching for answers in an uncertain world.
Monday, October 26, 2015, 7:00 PM
Mixrank, 164 Townsend St. #4, San Francisco, CA

Most of us are probably familiar with the trajectory software projects take: quick early progress with few people working on them, which transitions, as the scope grows, continuously but sharply to a regime where large numbers of people and large amounts of effort, at the scale of some of the largest corporations in history, are insufficient even to keep up with already known problems. Typically, motivated by the prevailing formal logic background in programming language theory, people turn to software methodologies with stronger a priori guarantees to mitigate this problem, such as functional programming with types, but I will propose a different, though not mutually exclusive, approach, drawing on a control theory and systems theory background. Motivated by Robert Kowalski's perspective developed in his "Algorithm = Logic + Control" (1979) I claim that the real problem is the combinatorial explosion in the number of algorithms required to enforce a desired set of relationships as that set of relationships grows in size. The solution is to finally come to grips with nondeterminism, and the solution to that, in turn, is to use approximate search techniques that can take advantage of uncertain information, information feedback, and compression of the search space. This motivates the design of the "Fifth" software system I'm currently working on. We'll conclude with a description of work in progress on the Fifth system.
<div><div dir="ltr">Hi all,<div>&nbsp;Sorry about the late notice, but it very recently occurred to me that this would be a good group to invite feedback from on a talk I'm giving this coming Monday on approximate search techniques for problems in programming languages. It's my attempt to describe for the programming language community the broader agenda from <a href="http://www.meetup.com/Bay-Area-entrepreneur-in-statistics/events/224830306/">this</a> <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZKlOrkfEPn8">talk</a> I gave last month, which covered, I suppose I could say, the intersection of nondeterminism and computation in a very broad interdisciplinary way. To help me with this shift in perspective, I could use some feedback on whether this makes sense and how I might improve the focus, either before the talk or after. What I'm trying to move towards is, in one sense, a generalization of constraint solving to arbitrary recursive relationships potentially involving uncertainty, so there's a lot of overlap in the applications with VPRI-like work and goals, such as declarative UI, better, easier parsing, and Hesam Samimi's PlanB, for example.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Hope to see some of you there or otherwise hear your thoughts. Here's the info:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.meetup.com/SF-Types-Theorems-and-Programming-Languages/events/226067416/">http://www.meetup.com/SF-Types-Theorems-and-Programming-Languages/events/226067416/</a><br>
</div>
<div><br></div>Finally Fifth? Searching for answers in an uncertain world.<div>Monday, October 26, 2015,&nbsp;7:00 PM<br><a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&amp;hl=en&amp;q=164+Townsend+St.+%234%2C+San+Francisco%2C+CA%2C+94107%2C+us">Mixrank</a>,&nbsp;164 Townsend St. #4, San Francisco, CA<div><br></div>Most of us are probably familiar with the trajectory software projects take: quick early progress with few people working on them, which transitions, as the scope grows, continuously but sharply to a regime where large numbers of people and large amounts of effort, at the scale of some of the largest corporations in history, are insufficient even to keep up with already known problems. Typically, motivated by the prevailing formal logic background in programming language theory, people turn to software methodologies with stronger a priori guarantees to mitigate this problem, such as functional programming with types, but I will propose a different, though not mutually exclusive, approach, drawing on a control theory and systems theory background. Motivated by Robert Kowalski's perspective developed in his "Algorithm = Logic + Control" (1979) I claim that the real problem is the combinatorial explosion in the number of algorithms required to enforce a desired set of relationships as that set of relationships grows in size. The solution is to finally come to grips with nondeterminism, and the solution to that, in turn, is to use approximate search techniques that can take advantage of uncertain information, information feedback, and compression of the search space. This motivates the design of the "Fifth" software system I'm currently working on. We'll conclude with a description of work in progress on the Fifth system.</div>
</div></div>
José María Conejero | 20 Oct 21:26 2015
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Modularity '16 - Deadline Approaching

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We apologize if you receive multiple copies of this CFP 
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*** MODULARITY '16 ***

15th International Conference on Modularity
March 14-17, 2016
Málaga, Spain


*** FINAL CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS ***

* Research Results and Modularity Visions tracks
  October 30, 2015 - Abstract submission (recommended)
  November 6, 2015- Paper submission

ABOUT MODULARITY

Modularity shapes the quality of information systems, software, and system production processes. Modularity influences system diversity, dependability, performance, evolution, the structure and the dynamics of the organizations that produce systems, human understanding and management of systems, and ultimately system value.

Yet the nature of and possibilities for modularity remain poorly understood, such things as the limits to modularity, the mechanisms needed to achieve it in given forms, and its costs and benefits. Significant advances in modularity are possible and promise to yield breakthroughs in our ability to conceive, design, develop, validate, integrate, deploy, operate, and evolve modern information systems and their underlying software artifacts.

Modularity at the semantic as well as the syntactic level is a key enabler for the expression of high quality software systems. One of the most important techniques for complexity management during the creation of software is abstraction. Novel concepts and abstraction mechanisms are a focus point for improvements in the support for modularity. The scope of this conference covers all perspectives on software systems in all their life-cycle phases, such as the following:
- domain analysis
- case studies on modularity or the lack thereof
- programming language constructs
- runtime environments and library support
- formal proofs of system properties
- program state visualization in debuggers
- performance improvements in compiler algorithms

The 2016 edition of the Modularity conference (formerly AOSD) sets out to advance our understanding of these issues and the expressive power of new and known techniques.

RESEARCH RESULTS AND MODULARITY VISIONS:

Modularity 2016 invites papers for its Research Results and Modularity Visions tracks presenting compelling insights into modularity in information systems, including its nature, forms, mechanisms, consequences, limits, costs, and benefits.

Pproceedings will appear in a volume of ICPS (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series) and in the ACM digital library.

All submissions are peer reviewed in accordance with the highest established standards of scientific rigor. Reviewers assess works in terms of research problem formulations, novelty and sophistication of proposed solutions, clarity and significance of contributions, and correct characterization of work in relation to existing knowledge.

Papers submitted to the Research Results track should present research results supported by proper design and execution of experimental or analytical assessments and sound interpretation of data.

Papers submitted to the Modularity Visions track are examined as scientific research proposals discussing compelling preliminary results or worked-out prototypes or proposals for sound future experimental or analytical assessments and interpretation of data. The scope of Modularity Visions is broad and open to submissions from all areas of computer science.

SUBMISSIONS, SELECTION PROCESS AND PROCEEDINGS 

Submissions should not have been published previously nor under review at other events. Research papers should describe work that advances the current state of the art. Experience papers should be of broad interest and should describe insights gained from substantive practical applications. The program committee will evaluate each contributed paper based on its relevance, significance, clarity, length, and originality.

Papers are to be submitted electronically at http://cyberchairpro.borbala.net/modularitypapers/submit/ for Research Results andhttp://cyberchairpro.borbala.net/modularityvisionspapers/submit/ for Modularity Visions in PDF format. Submissions must be in the ACM format (see http://www.sigplan.org/Resources/Author/, 10 point font) and not exceed 12 pages for regular papers and 4 pages for short papers. Short papers need to be labelled as such.

Note: In previous years, the conference had two rounds of submissions and reviews. Starting this year, Modularity 2016 will run a single-round two-phase reviewing process to help authors make their final papers the best that they can be. After the first phase, papers will be rejected, conditionally accepted, or unconditionally accepted. Conditionally accepted papers will be given a list of issues raised by reviewers. Authors must then submit a revised version of the paper with a cover letter explaining how they have or why they have not addressed these issues. The program committee will then consider the cover letter and revised paper, and recommend final acceptance or rejection. The second phase will only be used to elevate promising papers to the conference standard, not to require additional work of papers already deemed up to standard. All papers will remain under submission until the authors receive notification of acceptance or rejection.

All submitted papers are peer reviewed. Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library.

TOPICS OF INTEREST 

Modularity welcomes papers on topics that include, but are not limited to the following:
- new modularity mechanisms in programming, modeling, and domain-specific languages
- evaluation of modularity mechanisms in case studies
- understanding modularity in the context of development processes, collaboration, and organizational aspects
- role of modularity in the evolution of software systems
- measuring modularity
- modular re-engineering of legacy code
- domain analysis
- mathematics of modular paradigms for (automated) software construction
- module (feature) interactions
- novel module verification and testing techniques
- mining software repositories to develop theories related to modularity
- cost-benefit models of modularity mechanisms and techniques
- usability of interfaces and modularity mechanisms
- modularity supported by tools, such as view extraction, visualization, recommendation, and refactoring tools

IMPORTANT DATES

Abstracts (recommended) 
October 30, 2015 (Fri)

Papers (Research Results and Modularity Visions)
November 6, 2015 (Fri)

Primary notification
December 11, 2015 (Fri)

Revised papers due
January 8, 2016 (Fri)

Final notifications
January 22, 2016 (Fri)

Camera ready versions due
February 5, 2016 (Fri)

PROGRAM COMMITTEE CHAIRS

Research Results
- Don Batory, The University of Texas at Austin, USA (batory-NZpS4cJIG2HvQtjrzfazuQ@public.gmane.org)

Modularity Visions
- Krzysztof Czarnecki, University of Waterloo, Canada (kczarnec-K2/wOtV3zUiyWyQxGK9kgA@public.gmane.org)

PROGRAM COMMITTEES 

Research Results

- Mehmet Akşit, University of Twente, The Netherlands
- Jo Atlee, University of Waterloo, Canada
- Walter Cazzola, Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy
- Shigeru Chiba, The University of Tokyo, Japan
- Oscar Díaz, University of the Basque Country, Spain
- Gregor Engels, University of Paderborn, Germany
- Ismael Figueroa, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaiso, Chile
- Pascal Fradet, Inria Rhône-Alpes, France
- Jesús J. García Molina, Universidad de Murcia, Spain
- Jeff Gray, University of Alabama, USA
- George Heineman, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA
- Ralf Lämmel, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany
- Peter D Mosses, Swansea University, UK
- James Noble, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
- Jacques Noyé, École des Mines de Nantes, France
- Bruno C. d. S. Oliveira, The University of Hong Kong
- Hridesh Rajan, Iowa State University, USA
- Awais Rashid, Lancaster University, UK
- Julia Rubin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
- Guido Salvaneschi, Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany
- Norbert Siegmund, University of Passau, Germany
- Yannis Smaragdakis, University of Athens, Greece
- Eli Tilevich, Virginia Tech, USA
- Salva Trujillo, IK4-IKERLAN, Spain
- Steffen Zschaler, King’s College London, UK

Modularity Visions

- Thorsten Berger, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden
- Claus Brabrand, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark
- Richard P. Gabriel, IBM Research Almaden, USA
- Christian Kaestner, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
- Gail Murphy, University of British Columbia, Canada
- Sarah Nadi, Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany
- Yoshiki Ohshima, SAP Labs & Viewpoints Research Institute, USA
- Klaus Ostermann, University of Tuebingen, Germany
- Richard Paige, University of York, UK
- Andrzej Wasowski, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark

For additional information, clarification, or answers to questions please contact the Program Committee Chairs.

________________________________________________________________

José María Conejero Manzano
Quercus Software Engineering Group.
Assistant Professor, Universidad de Extremadura
Escuela Politécnica, Avda. de la Universidad, s/n. 10071 - Cáceres (Spain)
(  +34 927 257 100 (ext. 57563)
+34 927 257 202
chemacm-k+YKPWu6GLE@public.gmane.org  
________________________________________________________________


<div><div dir="ltr">
<div>
<div>-------------------------------------------------------------------------</div>
<div>We apologize if you receive multiple copies of this CFP&nbsp;</div>
<div>-------------------------------------------------------------------------</div>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>*** MODULARITY '16 ***</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>15th International Conference on Modularity</div>
<div>March 14-17, 2016</div>
<div>M&aacute;laga, Spain</div>
<div>
<a href="http://2016.modularity.info/" target="_blank">http://2016.modularity.info/</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div><br></div>
<div>***&nbsp;FINAL CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS&nbsp;***</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>* Research Results and Modularity Visions tracks</div>
<div>&nbsp; October 30, 2015 - Abstract submission (recommended)</div>
<div>&nbsp; November 6, 2015- Paper submission</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>ABOUT MODULARITY</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Modularity shapes the quality of information systems, software, and system production processes. Modularity influences system diversity, dependability, performance, evolution, the structure and the dynamics of the organizations that produce systems, human understanding and management of systems, and ultimately system value.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Yet the nature of and possibilities for modularity remain poorly understood, such things as the limits to modularity, the mechanisms needed to achieve it in given forms, and its costs and benefits. Significant advances in modularity are possible and promise to yield breakthroughs in our ability to conceive, design, develop, validate, integrate, deploy, operate, and evolve modern information systems and their underlying software artifacts.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Modularity at the semantic as well as the syntactic level is a key enabler for the expression of high quality software systems. One of the most important techniques for complexity management during the creation of software is abstraction. Novel concepts and abstraction mechanisms are a focus point for improvements in the support for modularity. The scope of this conference covers all perspectives on software systems in all their life-cycle phases, such as the following:</div>
<div>- domain analysis</div>
<div>- case studies on modularity or the lack thereof</div>
<div>- programming language constructs</div>
<div>- runtime environments and library support</div>
<div>- formal proofs of system properties</div>
<div>- program state visualization in debuggers</div>
<div>- performance improvements in compiler algorithms</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>The 2016 edition of the Modularity conference (formerly AOSD) sets out to advance our understanding of these issues and the expressive power of new and known techniques.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>RESEARCH RESULTS AND MODULARITY VISIONS:</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Modularity 2016 invites papers for its Research Results and Modularity Visions tracks presenting compelling insights into modularity in information systems, including its nature, forms, mechanisms, consequences, limits, costs, and benefits.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>P<span>proceedings will appear in a volume of ICPS (ACM International Conference Proceeding Series) and in the ACM digital library.</span>
</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>All submissions are peer reviewed in accordance with the highest established standards of scientific rigor. Reviewers assess works in terms of research problem formulations, novelty and sophistication of proposed solutions, clarity and significance of contributions, and correct characterization of work in relation to existing knowledge.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Papers submitted to the Research Results track should present research results supported by proper design and execution of experimental or analytical assessments and sound interpretation of data.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Papers submitted to the Modularity Visions track are examined as scientific research proposals discussing compelling preliminary results or worked-out prototypes or proposals for sound future experimental or analytical assessments and interpretation of data. The scope of Modularity Visions is broad and open to submissions from all areas of computer science.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>SUBMISSIONS, SELECTION PROCESS AND PROCEEDINGS&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Submissions should not have been published previously nor under review at other events. Research papers should describe work that advances the current state of the art. Experience papers should be of broad interest and should describe insights gained from substantive practical applications. The program committee will evaluate each contributed paper based on its relevance, significance, clarity, length, and originality.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Papers are to be submitted electronically at&nbsp;<a href="http://cyberchairpro.borbala.net/modularitypapers/submit/" target="_blank">http://cyberchairpro.borbala.net/modularitypapers/submit/</a>&nbsp;for Research Results and<a href="http://cyberchairpro.borbala.net/modularityvisionspapers/submit/" target="_blank">http://cyberchairpro.borbala.net/modularityvisionspapers/submit/</a>&nbsp;for Modularity Visions in PDF format. Submissions must be in the ACM format (see&nbsp;<a href="http://www.sigplan.org/Resources/Author/" target="_blank">http://www.sigplan.org/Resources/Author/</a>, 10 point font) and not exceed 12 pages for regular papers and 4 pages for short papers. Short papers need to be labelled as such.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Note: In previous years, the conference had two rounds of submissions and reviews. Starting this year, Modularity 2016 will run a single-round two-phase reviewing process to help authors make their final papers the best that they can be. After the first phase, papers will be rejected, conditionally accepted, or unconditionally accepted. Conditionally accepted papers will be given a list of issues raised by reviewers. Authors must then submit a revised version of the paper with a cover letter explaining how they have or why they have not addressed these issues. The program committee will then consider the cover letter and revised paper, and recommend final acceptance or rejection. The second phase will only be used to elevate promising papers to the conference standard, not to require additional work of papers already deemed up to standard. All papers will remain under submission until the authors receive notification of acceptance or rejection.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>All submitted papers are peer reviewed. Accepted papers will be published in the ACM Digital Library.</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>TOPICS OF INTEREST&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Modularity welcomes papers on topics that include, but are not limited to the following:</div>
<div>- new modularity mechanisms in programming, modeling, and domain-specific languages</div>
<div>- evaluation of modularity mechanisms in case studies</div>
<div>- understanding modularity in the context of development processes, collaboration, and organizational aspects</div>
<div>- role of modularity in the evolution of software systems</div>
<div>- measuring modularity</div>
<div>- modular re-engineering of legacy code</div>
<div>- domain analysis</div>
<div>- mathematics of modular paradigms for (automated) software construction</div>
<div>- module (feature) interactions</div>
<div>- novel module verification and testing techniques</div>
<div>- mining software repositories to develop theories related to modularity</div>
<div>- cost-benefit models of modularity mechanisms and techniques</div>
<div>- usability of interfaces and modularity mechanisms</div>
<div>- modularity supported by tools, such as view extraction, visualization, recommendation, and refactoring tools</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>IMPORTANT DATES</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Abstracts (recommended)&nbsp;</div>
<div>October 30, 2015 (Fri)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Papers (Research Results and Modularity Visions)</div>
<div>November 6, 2015 (Fri)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Primary notification</div>
<div>December 11, 2015 (Fri)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Revised papers due</div>
<div>January 8, 2016 (Fri)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Final notifications</div>
<div>January 22, 2016 (Fri)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Camera ready versions due</div>
<div>February 5, 2016 (Fri)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>PROGRAM COMMITTEE CHAIRS</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Research Results</div>
<div>- Don Batory, The University of Texas at Austin, USA (<a>batory@...</a>)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Modularity Visions</div>
<div>- Krzysztof Czarnecki, University of Waterloo, Canada (<a>kczarnec@...</a>)</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>PROGRAM COMMITTEES&nbsp;</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Research Results</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>- Mehmet Ak&#351;it, University of Twente, The Netherlands</div>
<div>- Jo Atlee, University of Waterloo, Canada</div>
<div>- Walter Cazzola, Universit&agrave; degli Studi di Milano, Italy</div>
<div>- Shigeru Chiba, The University of Tokyo, Japan</div>
<div>- Oscar D&iacute;az, University of the Basque Country, Spain</div>
<div>- Gregor Engels, University of Paderborn, Germany</div>
<div>- Ismael Figueroa, Pontificia Universidad Cat&oacute;lica de Valparaiso, Chile</div>
<div>- Pascal Fradet, Inria Rh&ocirc;ne-Alpes, France</div>
<div>- Jes&uacute;s J. Garc&iacute;a Molina, Universidad de Murcia, Spain</div>
<div>- Jeff Gray, University of Alabama, USA</div>
<div>- George Heineman, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, USA</div>
<div>- Ralf L&auml;mmel, University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany</div>
<div>- Peter D Mosses, Swansea University, UK</div>
<div>- James Noble, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand</div>
<div>- Jacques Noy&eacute;, &Eacute;cole des Mines de Nantes, France</div>
<div>- Bruno C. d. S. Oliveira, The University of Hong Kong</div>
<div>- Hridesh Rajan, Iowa State University, USA</div>
<div>- Awais Rashid, Lancaster University, UK</div>
<div>- Julia Rubin, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA</div>
<div>- Guido Salvaneschi, Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany</div>
<div>- Norbert Siegmund, University of Passau, Germany</div>
<div>- Yannis Smaragdakis, University of Athens, Greece</div>
<div>- Eli Tilevich, Virginia Tech, USA</div>
<div>- Salva Trujillo, IK4-IKERLAN, Spain</div>
<div>- Steffen Zschaler, King&rsquo;s College London, UK</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>Modularity Visions</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>- Thorsten Berger, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden</div>
<div>- Claus Brabrand, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark</div>
<div>- Richard P. Gabriel, IBM Research Almaden, USA</div>
<div>- Christian Kaestner, Carnegie Mellon University, USA</div>
<div>- Gail Murphy, University of British Columbia, Canada</div>
<div>- Sarah Nadi, Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany</div>
<div>- Yoshiki Ohshima, SAP Labs &amp; Viewpoints Research Institute, USA</div>
<div>- Klaus Ostermann, University of Tuebingen, Germany</div>
<div>- Richard Paige, University of York, UK</div>
<div>- Andrzej Wasowski, IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark</div>
<div><br></div>
<div>For additional information, clarification, or answers to questions please contact the Program Committee Chairs.</div>
<div><div class="gmail_signature"><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr"><div><div dir="ltr">
<div><p><span>________________________________________________________________</span><br></p></div>Jos&eacute; Mar&iacute;a Conejero Manzano<br>Quercus Software Engineering Group.<br>Assistant Professor, Universidad de Extremadura<br>Escuela Polit&eacute;cnica, Avda. de la Universidad, s/n.&nbsp;10071 - C&aacute;ceres (Spain)<br><span>(</span>&nbsp; +34 927 257 100 (ext. 57563)<br><div>
<span>7&nbsp;</span>+34 927 257 202<br><span>*&nbsp;</span><a href="mailto:chemacm@..." target="_blank">chemacm@...</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;</div>
<div>
<a href="http://about.me/chemacm" target="_blank"></a>&nbsp; &nbsp;<a href="http://about.me/chemacm" target="_blank">http://about.me/chemacm</a>
</div>
<div><div>________________________________________________________________<br><br>
</div></div>
<div><br></div>
</div></div></div></div></div></div></div>
</div></div>

Gmane