Sebastian Erdweg | 27 Apr 11:23 2015
Picon

Final CFP: Workshop on Generic Programming 2015 - Deadline May 15

======================================================================
                       CALL FOR PAPERS

                           WGP 2015

        11th ACM SIGPLAN Workshop on Generic Programming
                      Vancouver, Canada
                    Sunday, August 30, 2015

                http://www.wgp-sigplan.org/2015

                      Co-located with the
International Conference on Functional Programming (ICFP 2015)
======================================================================

Goals of the workshop
---------------------

Generic programming is about making programs more adaptable by making
them more general. Generic programs often embody non-traditional kinds
of polymorphism; ordinary programs are obtained from them by suitably
instantiating their parameters. In contrast with normal programs, the
parameters of a generic program are often quite rich in structure; for
example they may be other programs, types or type constructors, class
hierarchies, or even programming paradigms.

Generic programming techniques have always been of interest, both to
practitioners and to theoreticians, and, for at least 20 years,
generic programming techniques have been a specific focus of research
in the functional and object-oriented programming communities. Generic
(Continue reading)

Lucas Satabin | 30 Apr 08:47 2015

Diffson 1.0.0 released

Hi all,

I am glad to announce the new release of the Diffson library.

Diffson is a Scala library to create and apply diffs and patches on json 
document.
It is an implementation of RFCs 6901 [0] and 6902 [1].

This new major version includes several changes:

  - switch to spray-json [2] as underlying json library instead of 
lift-json [3],
  - fallback to another LCS algorithm when patience algorithm is not 
able to produce good diffs
  - test against the compliance tests [4].

Diffson 1.0.0 is released for scala 2.10 and 2.11 and jars have been 
uploaded on sonatype maven repository. They should be available on 
central repository within a few hours.

You can find the project on its website: https://github.com/gnieh/diffson

Comments and feedback are welcome!

Lucas

[0]: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6901
[1]: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6902
[2]: https://github.com/spray/spray-json
[3]: https://github.com/lift/framework/tree/master/core/json
(Continue reading)

David Barri | 15 Apr 09:03 2015
Picon

ScalaCSS 0.2.0 released!

ScalaCSS v0.2.0 has been released with lots of yummy changes.

Changelog:

Project page:


ScalaCSS is a standalone library for Scala and Scala.JS, that aims to bring type-safety and clarity to:
  • creating CSS
  • using CSS
  • maintaining CSS
  • correctness of CSS
You can create standalone stylesheets like SCSS/LESS, and you can create inline styles to be applied to directly to HTML. It currently has modules for integration with scalajs-react and Scalatags.

Happy Coding!

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Jon Pretty | 3 Apr 15:41 2015

Rapture I18N: Simple, Typesafe Internationalized Strings

Dear all,

I've just released a first version of Rapture I18N which provides a very simple API for working with internationalized strings, i.e. a single value which represents strings in a number of different languages, for example:

val greeting = en"Hello" | fr"Bonjour" | de"Guten Tag"

Types are used to enforce all required languages are present, so missing language strings always manifest themselves as type errors at compile time. Full details and instructions for use are on the Rapture I18N Github page:

   https://github.com/propensive/rapture-i18n/

A few simple tests are available in the rapture-i18n-test project:

   https://github.com/propensive/rapture-i18n-test/

Rapture I18N is available for Scala 2.10 and 2.11 on Maven Central, and can be included in an SBT project by including the line:

   libraryDependencies ++= Seq("com.propensive" %% "rapture-i18n" % "1.2.0")

Many thanks to Christopher Vogt for the inspiration for the idea.

Cheers,
Jon
<at> propensive

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Vladimir Kostyukov | 31 Mar 04:44 2015
Picon

Announcing Finch, a library for build REST APIs with Finagle

Hi All!

It's been a while since I started working on the Finch library: the first public release happened 8 month ago. While it's still "experimental", there are already several adopters who is using Finch in production. A couple of days ago I released the 0.6.0 version that introduces an experimental API with code name "Your REST API as a Monad".

Finch is made for people who both love functional programming and using Finagle for serving HTTP services.

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Philipp Haller | 28 Mar 18:22 2015
Picon

CFP: Scala Symposium 2015 [EXTENDED DEADLINE]

*** NOTE DEADLINES EXTENDED ***

Abstract submission: April 4, 2015
Paper/talk submission: April 11, 2015

========================================================================
                         Scala Symposium 2015

                      co-located with PLDI 2015
                        Portland, Oregon, USA
                           June 13-14, 2015

                           CALL FOR PAPERS

                 http://lamp.epfl.ch/~hmiller/scala2015
========================================================================

Scala is a general-purpose programming language designed to express common
programming patterns in a concise, elegant, and type-safe way. It smoothly
integrates features of object-oriented and functional languages.

This symposium is a forum for researchers and practitioners to share new ideas
and results of interest to the Scala community.


Important Dates
===============

* Abstract submission:   April 4, 2015
* Paper/talk submission: April 11, 2015
* Author notification:   May 4, 2015
* Final papers due:      May 14, 2015

All deadlines are at 23:59 Baker Island, USA (UTC-12).


Scope
=====

We seek papers on topics related to Scala, including (but not limited to):

- Language design and implementation -- language extensions, optimization, and
  performance evaluation.
- Library design and implementation patterns for extending Scala -- embedded
  domain-specific languages, combining language features, generic and meta-programming.
- Formal techniques for Scala-like programs -- formalizations of the language,
  type system, and semantics, formalizing proposed language extensions and
  variants, dependent object types, type and effect systems.
- Concurrent and distributed programming -- libraries, frameworks, language
  extensions, programming paradigms: (actors, STM, ...), performance
  evaluation, experimental results.
- Safety and reliability -- pluggable type systems, contracts, static analysis
  and verification, runtime monitoring.
- Tools -- development environments, debuggers, refactoring tools, testing
  frameworks.
- Case studies, experience reports, and pearls.

Submitted papers should describe new ideas, experimental results, or projects
related to Scala. In order to encourage lively discussion, submitted papers
may describe work in progress. All papers will be judged on a combination of
correctness, significance, novelty, clarity, and interest to the community.

In general, papers should explain their original contributions,
identifying what has been accomplished, explaining why it is
significant, and relating it to previous work (also for other
languages where appropriate). Papers in the last category of the list
above need not necessarily report original research results; they may
instead, for example, report practical experience that will be useful
to others, new Scala idioms, or programming pearls. In all cases, such
a paper must make a contribution which is of interest to the Scala
community, or from which other members of the Scala community can
benefit.

KEYWORDS: Library Design and Implementation, Language Design and
Implementation, Applications, Formal Techniques, Parallelism and
Concurrency, Distributed Programming, Tools, Experience Reports,
Empirical Studies


Academic Student Talks
======================

In addition to regular papers and tool demos, we also solicit short student
talks by bachelor/master/PhD students. A student talk is not accompanied by a
paper (it is sufficient to submit a short abstract of the talk in plain text).
Student talks are about 5-10 minutes long, presenting ongoing or completed
research related to Scala. In previous years, each student with an accepted
student talk received a grant (donated by our sponsors) covering registration
and/or travel costs.


Open Source Talks
=================

We will also accept a limited number of short talks about open-source projects
using Scala presented by contributors. An open-source talk is not accompanied
by a paper (it is sufficient to submit a short abstract of the talk in plain
text). Open-source talks are about 10 minutes long, presenting or announcing
an open-source project that is of interest to the Scala community.


Proceedings
===========

It is planned to publish accepted papers in the ACM Digital Library. Authors
must transfer copyright to ACM upon acceptance (for government work,
to the extent transferable), but retain various rights (see ACM Copyright
Policy). Authors are encouraged to publish auxiliary material with their paper
(source code, test data, etc.); they retain copyright of auxiliary material.


Submission Details
==================

Submitted papers should be in portable document format (PDF), formatted using
the standard ACM SIGPLAN two-column conference style (10pt format). Regular
research papers must not exceed 10 pages, tool demonstration papers and short
papers must not exceed 4 pages. "Tool Demos" and "Short Papers" should be
marked as such with those words in the title at time of submission.
Each paper submission must adhere to ACM SIGPLAN's republication policy, as
explained on the web.

Note: "Short Papers" differ from "Tool Demos" in that "Short Papers" are
approached as short research papers. "Short Papers" are expected to carry some
new insights or contribution, and to compare with related work, as with any
normal research paper. They are simply shorter versions of full research
papers. "Tool Demos" on the other hand are about showcasing a well-developed,
well-documented tool, live, before the symposium. Papers corresponding to "Tool Demos"
are meant to contain an overview of the tool and methodology for the
tool's use. Tool demo papers are less concerned about providing new research
insights, or thoroughly comparing with related work. The Scala Symposium PC
will approach tool demos in the same way as the PEPM'14 Workshop PC, detailed in
PEPM's Tool Paper Evaluation Criteria
(see http://www.program-transformation.org/PEPM14/ToolPaperAdvice).

Student talks and open-source talks are not accompanied by papers. Therefore,
it is sufficient to only submit a plain-text abstract. Both "Student Talks"
and "Open Source Talks" should be marked as such with those words in the title
at time of submission.

Submission see: http://lampwww.epfl.ch/~hmiller/scala2015


Program Committee
=================

* Oscar Boykin, Twitter
* Dave Clarke, Uppsala University
* Doug Lea, State University of New York (SUNY) Oswego
* Ondrej Lhotak, University of Waterloo
* Matt Might, University of Utah
* Adriaan Moors, Typesafe
* Nate Nystrom, University of Lugano
* Bruno Oliveira, University of Hong Kong
* Martin Odersky, EPFL
* Tiark Rompf, Purdue University
* Guido Salvaneschi, TU Darmstadt
* Daniel Spiewak, RichRelevance
* Lex Spoon, Semmle
* Jan Vitek, Northeastern University
* Damien Zufferey, MIT

Organizers
==========

* Philipp Haller, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Co-chair)
* Heather Miller, EPFL (Co-chair)
* Martin Odersky, EPFL and Typesafe


Links
=====

* The Scala Symposium 2015 website: http://lampwww.epfl.ch/~hmiller/scala2015
* The PLDI 2015 website: http://conf.researchr.org/home/pldi2015

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Daniel Armak | 26 Mar 15:00 2015
Picon

safepickle - another small but powerful pickling library

Hello,

In a complete coincidence, I’d like to announce another new serialization library, safepickle.

It provides a combination of features that are not available in other pickling libraries:

  1. Pluggable backends for JSON, BSON and other similar formats.
  2. Pickled classes correspond directly to the pickled form (at least for JSON and BSON), making it easy to write classes to represent data whose main schema definition is written in terms of the pickled format. As a matter of policy, safepickle does not automatically serialize types that don’t look ‘natural’ in JSON.
  3. Certain changes to the definitions of pickled types are guaranteed to be backward and forward compatible, so different versions of the program can communicate, and pickled data can be used for long term storage.
  4. Backward incompatible changes can be managed explicitly, with version numbers and conversion code, allowing new code to read data written by old code, and old code to fail on encountering data written by new code.

As a matter of design, it focuses on security and performance at the expense of some features other libraries have:

  • Security: pickled input can be generated by untrusted sources. Unpickling must not instantiate unexpected classes, take unpredictable amounts of space or time, or produce values not of the expected type. The set of pickleable types, and the code that serializes them, is determined at compile time, and runtime reflection is never used.

  • Performance: the picklers are thin layers on top of the backend implementations and should not contribute to pickling overhead in any scenario.

It’s available on maven-central; the latest version is currently 0.7.1.

P.S. I was obviously unaware of picopickle when I started writing this. The feature set is not identical, but close enough that it’s not impossible that one of us might one day decide to join efforts and migrate the missing features to the other project.

Daniel Armak

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Vladimir Matveev | 25 Mar 11:24 2015
Picon

picopickle - a small but powerful shapeless-based serialization library

Hello,

I'd like to announce a new serialization library, picopickle. I've just pushed v0.1.0 to Maven central. It highly resembles other serialization libraries (mostly upickle, play-json, json4s and a couple of others) but it provides some features which I couldn't find in all of them - the largest one being a support for different serialization formats.

What is currently available:
  • serialization and deserialization of all basic Scala types: primitives, strings, symbols, options, eithers, etc;
  • serialization and deserialization of almost all Scala collections;
  • serialization and deserialization of almost arbitrary sealed trait hierarchies, i.e. case classes and case objects, possibly implementing a sealed trait, powered by shapeless;
  • case class serialization supports renaming the fields and classes, default values and optional fields, as well as circular type dependencies;
  • customizable nulls handling;
  • two backends - JSON and collections, allowing serialization and deserialization to and from JSON and collections, respectively;
  • a converters library which provides a DSL for writing custom serializers in a declarative way.
You can find more in the readme, including examples on how to use the library.

Unfortunately, the API documentation is currently somewhat lacking (especially on converters), but this is going to improve in the future.


Regards,

Vladimir

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Philipp Haller | 6 Mar 17:43 2015
Picon

2nd CFP Scala Symposium 2015

The submission deadline for the 2015 Scala Symposium (formerly, Scala Workshop) is approaching. Please consider submitting research papers, experience reports, tool demos, or academic student talks. The symposium is co-located with PLDI on June 13-14 in Portland, Oregon:
http://lampwww.epfl.ch/~hmiller/scala2015/

We also seek sponsors to support the attendance of talented students. In the past, the Scala Workshop was sponsored by companies such as SoundCloud, Goldman Sachs, Typesafe, innoQ, and Oracle. In case of interest, please get in touch!

Cheers,
Philipp


========================================================================
                         Scala Symposium 2015

                      co-located with PLDI 2015
                        Portland, Oregon, USA
                           June 13-14, 2015

                        SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS

                 http://lamp.epfl.ch/~hmiller/scala2015
========================================================================

Scala is a general-purpose programming language designed to express common
programming patterns in a concise, elegant, and type-safe way. It smoothly
integrates features of object-oriented and functional languages.

This symposium is a forum for researchers and practitioners to share new ideas
and results of interest to the Scala community.


Important Dates
===============

* Abstract submission:   March 26, 2015
* Paper/talk submission: April 2, 2015
* Author notification:   April 27, 2015
* Final papers due:      May 7, 2015

All deadlines are at 23:59 Baker Island, USA (UTC-12).


Scope
=====

We seek papers on topics related to Scala, including (but not limited to):

- Language design and implementation -- language extensions, optimization, and
  performance evaluation.
- Library design and implementation patterns for extending Scala -- embedded
  domain-specific languages, combining language features, generic and meta-programming.
- Formal techniques for Scala-like programs -- formalizations of the language,
  type system, and semantics, formalizing proposed language extensions and
  variants, dependent object types, type and effect systems.
- Concurrent and distributed programming -- libraries, frameworks, language
  extensions, programming paradigms: (actors, STM, ...), performance
  evaluation, experimental results.
- Safety and reliability -- pluggable type systems, contracts, static analysis
  and verification, runtime monitoring.
- Tools -- development environments, debuggers, refactoring tools, testing
  frameworks.
- Case studies, experience reports, and pearls.

Submitted papers should describe new ideas, experimental results, or projects
related to Scala. In order to encourage lively discussion, submitted papers
may describe work in progress. All papers will be judged on a combination of
correctness, significance, novelty, clarity, and interest to the community.

In general, papers should explain their original contributions,
identifying what has been accomplished, explaining why it is
significant, and relating it to previous work (also for other
languages where appropriate). Papers in the last category of the list
above need not necessarily report original research results; they may
instead, for example, report practical experience that will be useful
to others, new Scala idioms, or programming pearls. In all cases, such
a paper must make a contribution which is of interest to the Scala
community, or from which other members of the Scala community can
benefit.

KEYWORDS: Library Design and Implementation, Language Design and
Implementation, Applications, Formal Techniques, Parallelism and
Concurrency, Distributed Programming, Tools, Experience Reports,
Empirical Studies


Academic Student Talks
======================

In addition to regular papers and tool demos, we also solicit short student
talks by bachelor/master/PhD students. A student talk is not accompanied by a
paper (it is sufficient to submit a short abstract of the talk in plain text).
Student talks are about 5-10 minutes long, presenting ongoing or completed
research related to Scala. In previous years, each student with an accepted
student talk received a grant (donated by our sponsors) covering registration
and/or travel costs.


Open Source Talks
=================

We will also accept a limited number of short talks about open-source projects
using Scala presented by contributors. An open-source talk is not accompanied
by a paper (it is sufficient to submit a short abstract of the talk in plain
text). Open-source talks are about 10 minutes long, presenting or announcing
an open-source project that is of interest to the Scala community.


Proceedings
===========

It is planned to publish accepted papers in the ACM Digital Library. Authors
must transfer copyright to ACM upon acceptance (for government work,
to the extent transferable), but retain various rights (see ACM Copyright
Policy). Authors are encouraged to publish auxiliary material with their paper
(source code, test data, etc.); they retain copyright of auxiliary material.


Submission Details
==================

Submitted papers should be in portable document format (PDF), formatted using
the standard ACM SIGPLAN two-column conference style (10pt format). Regular
research papers must not exceed 10 pages, tool demonstration papers and short
papers must not exceed 4 pages. "Tool Demos" and "Short Papers" should be
marked as such with those words in the title at time of submission.
Each paper submission must adhere to ACM SIGPLAN's republication policy, as
explained on the web.

Note: "Short Papers" differ from "Tool Demos" in that "Short Papers" are
approached as short research papers. "Short Papers" are expected to carry some
new insights or contribution, and to compare with related work, as with any
normal research paper. They are simply shorter versions of full research
papers. "Tool Demos" on the other hand are about showcasing a well-developed,
well-documented tool, live, before the symposium. Papers corresponding to "Tool Demos"
are meant to contain an overview of the tool and methodology for the
tool's use. Tool demo papers are less concerned about providing new research
insights, or thoroughly comparing with related work. The Scala Symposium PC
will approach tool demos in the same way as the PEPM'14 Workshop PC, detailed in
PEPM's Tool Paper Evaluation Criteria
(see http://www.program-transformation.org/PEPM14/ToolPaperAdvice).

Student talks and open-source talks are not accompanied by papers. Therefore,
it is sufficient to only submit a plain-text abstract. Both "Student Talks"
and "Open Source Talks" should be marked as such with those words in the title
at time of submission.

Submission see: http://lampwww.epfl.ch/~hmiller/scala2015


Program Committee
=================

* Oscar Boykin, Twitter
* Dave Clarke, Uppsala University
* Doug Lea, State University of New York (SUNY) Oswego
* Ondrej Lhotak, University of Waterloo
* Matt Might, University of Utah
* Adriaan Moors, Typesafe
* Nate Nystrom, University of Lugano
* Bruno Oliveira, University of Hong Kong
* Martin Odersky, EPFL
* Tiark Rompf, Purdue University and Oracle Labs
* Guido Salvaneschi, TU Darmstadt
* Daniel Spiewak, RichRelevance
* Lex Spoon, Semmle
* Jan Vitek, Northeastern University
* Damien Zufferey, MIT

Organizers
==========

* Philipp Haller, KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Co-chair)
* Heather Miller, EPFL (Co-chair)
* Martin Odersky, EPFL and Typesafe


Links
=====

* The Scala Symposium 2015 website: http://lampwww.epfl.ch/~hmiller/scala2015
* The PLDI 2015 website: http://conf.researchr.org/home/pldi2015

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Sebastian Erdweg | 5 Mar 11:16 2015
Picon

CFP: Workshop on Generic Programming 2015 - Deadline May 15

======================================================================
                          CALL FOR PAPERS

                              WGP 2015

           11th ACM SIGPLAN Workshop on Generic Programming
                         Vancouver, Canada
                       Sunday, August 30, 2015

                   http://www.wgp-sigplan.org/2015

                         Co-located with the
   International Conference on Functional Programming (ICFP 2015)
======================================================================

Goals of the workshop
---------------------

Generic programming is about making programs more adaptable by making
them more general. Generic programs often embody non-traditional kinds
of polymorphism; ordinary programs are obtained from them by suitably
instantiating their parameters. In contrast with normal programs, the
parameters of a generic program are often quite rich in structure; for
example they may be other programs, types or type constructors, class
hierarchies, or even programming paradigms.

Generic programming techniques have always been of interest, both to
practitioners and to theoreticians, and, for at least 20 years,
generic programming techniques have been a specific focus of research
in the functional and object-oriented programming communities. Generic
programming has gradually spread to more and more mainstream
languages, and today is widely used in industry. This workshop brings
together leading researchers and practitioners in generic programming
from around the world, and features papers capturing the state of the
art in this important area.

We welcome contributions on all aspects, theoretical as well as
practical, of

 * generic programming,
 * programming with (C++) concepts,
 * meta-programming,
 * programming with type classes,
 * programming with modules,
 * programming with dependent types,
 * type systems for generic programming,
 * polytypic programming,
 * adaptive object-oriented programming,
 * component-based programming,
 * strategic programming,
 * aspect-oriented programming,
 * family polymorphism,
 * object-oriented generic programming,
 * implementation of generic programming languages,
 * static and dynamic analyses of generic programs,
 * and so on.

Program Committee
-----------------

 * Patrick Bahr (co-chair), University of Copenhagen
 * Sebastian Erdweg (co-chair), Technical University of Darmstadt
 * Edwin Brady, University of St Andrews
 * Edsko de Vries, Well-Typed LLP
 * Mauro Jaskelioff, National University of Rosario
 * Johan Jeuring, Utrecht University
 * Pieter Koopman, Radboud University Nijmegen
 * Bruno C. d. S. Oliveira, University of Hong Kong
 * Nicolas Pouillard, IT University of Copenhagen
 * Sukyoung Ryu, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
 * Sibylle Schupp, Hamburg University of Technology
 * Sam Tobin-Hochstadt, Indiana University

Proceedings and Copyright
-------------------------

We plan to have formal proceedings, published by the ACM. Accepted
papers will be included in the ACM Digital Library. Authors must grant
ACM publication rights upon acceptance
(http://authors.acm.org/main.html), but may retain copyright if they
wish. Authors are encouraged to publish auxiliary material with their
paper (source code, test data, and so forth). The proceedings will be
freely available for download from the ACM Digital Library from one
week before the start of the conference until two weeks after the
conference.

Submission details
------------------

 * Submission deadline:  Fri, 15th May 2015
 * Author notification:  Fri, 26th June 2015
 * Final version due:    Sun, 19th July 2015
 * Workshop:             Sun, 30th August 2015

Submitted papers should fall into one of two categories:

 * Regular research papers (12 pages)
 * Short papers: case studies, tool demos, generic pearls (6 pages)

Regular research papers are expected to present novel and interesting
research results. Short papers need not present novel or fully polished
results. Good candidates for short papers are those that report on 
interesting case studies of generic programming in open source or 
industry, present demos of generic programming tools or libraries, 
or discuss elegant and illustrative uses of generic programming ('pearls').

All submissions should be in portable document format (PDF), formatted
using the ACM SIGPLAN style guidelines (two-column, 9pt). Regular 
research papers must not exceed 12 pages. Short papers must not exceed 
6 pages. If applicable, papers should be marked with one of the labels
'case study, 'tool demo' or 'generic pearl' in the title at the time 
of submission.

Papers should be submitted via HotCRP at

 https://icfp-wgp15.hotcrp.com/

Travel Support
--------------

Student attendees with accepted papers can apply for a SIGPLAN PAC grant
to help cover travel expenses. PAC also offers other support, such as
for child-care expenses during the meeting or for travel costs for
companions of SIGPLAN members with physical disabilities, as well as for
travel from locations outside of North America and Europe. For details
on the PAC program, see its web page (http://www.sigplan.org/PAC.htm).

History of the Workshop on Generic Programming
----------------------------------------------

Earlier Workshops on Generic Programming have been held in

 * Gothenburg, Sweden 2014 (affiliated with ICFP),
 * Boston, Massachusetts, US 2013 (affiliated with ICFP),
 * Copenhagen, Denmark 2012 (affiliated with ICFP),
 * Tokyo, Japan 2011 (affiliated with ICFP),
 * Baltimore, Maryland, US 2010 (affiliated with ICFP),
 * Edinburgh, UK 2009 (affiliated with ICFP),
 * Victoria, BC, Canada 2008 (affiliated with ICFP),
 * Portland 2006 (affiliated with ICFP),
 * Ponte de Lima 2000 (affiliated with MPC),
 * Marstrand 1998 (affiliated with MPC).

Furthermore, there were a few informal workshops

 * Utrecht 2005 (informal workshop),
 * Dagstuhl 2002 (IFIP WG2.1 Working Conference),
 * Nottingham 2001 (informal workshop).

There were also (closely related) DGP workshops in Oxford (June
3-4 2004), and a Spring School on DGP in Nottingham (April 24-27
2006, which had a half-day workshop attached).

WGP Steering Committee
----------------------

 * Andres Löh
 * Ronald Garcia
 * Jacques Carette
 * Jeremiah Willcock
 * José Pedro Magalhães
 * Tiark Rompf
 * Tarmo Uustalo
 * Stephanie Weirich
 * Fritz Henglein

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Lloyd C | 5 Mar 04:19 2015
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Zipkin-futures: Zipkin tracing for Scala Futures and non-Futures

Hi,

Zipkin-Futures (https://github.com/lloydmeta/zipkin-futures) is a lib that allows you to easily send Spans to a Zipkin collector that measure how long a Scala operation (async or sync) has taken to execute.

There is an accompanying zipkin-futures-play project that makes it easy to use w/ Play (so that parent Spans describe via HTTP headers are respected)

It is Mavenised and easy to install:

libraryDependencies ++= Seq( "com.beachape" %% "zipkin-futures" % "0.0.9" // OR "com.beachape" %% "zipkin-futures-play" % "0.0.9" // if you are using Play and want to use the filter w/ RequestHeader conversions )

Example usage:

/* A simple new Span that tells us we have no parent here. */ implicit val span = new Span() // Using a simple LoggingSpanCollectorImpl here as an example, but it can be a ZipkinSpanCollector that actually sends spans implicit val zipkinService = new BraveZipkinService("localhost", 9000, "testing", new LoggingSpanCollectorImpl("application")) val myTracedFuture1 = TracedFuture("slowHttpCall") { _ => expensiveOp }

Relevant links:

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