Barrie Stott | 2 Jul 15:38 2010
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Use of .document with RDoc

Suppose I've installed the rdoc (2.5.8) gem without creating any
documentation. It has a top level file, .document, that contains:

	History.txt
	README.txt
	RI.txt
	lib

I move to the directory .../gems/rdoc-2.5.8 and run the command:

	rdoc --ri --op /tmp/doc

I expect to get all relevant ri documentation in /tmp/doc but I see
nothing corresponding to the .txt files mentioned in .document.

I would be grateful if someone could explain to me what I am doing
wrong and, even more importantly, what I should do to get the
documentation corresponding to the .txt files.

Barrie.

Roger Pack | 3 Jul 00:40 2010
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Re: Use of .document with RDoc

if you have
dir1/
 History.txt
 README.txt

then your .document file should be in dir1, like
History.txt
README.txt
lib

then run it like
cd ..
rdoc dir1

or rdoc .

and something about those files should show up in the output.

Barrie Stott | 3 Jul 11:02 2010
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Re: Use of .document with RDoc

On Fri, Jul 02, 2010 at 04:40:27PM -0600, Roger Pack wrote:
> if you have
> dir1/
>  History.txt
>  README.txt
> 
> 
> then your .document file should be in dir1, like
> History.txt
> README.txt
> lib
> 
> then run it like
> cd ..
> rdoc dir1
> 
> or rdoc .
> 
> and something about those files should show up in the output.

I suspect that wanting stuff from non-ruby files available to ri was
stupid. If I had a dozen gems each with a README.txt, how would I tell
ri which one I wanted? I need rdoc output to see such information and
that is provided without problem.

I'm sorry for any trouble I have caused and am grateful for your reply
since it set me on the right lines.

Barrie.

(Continue reading)

travis.ml-ruby-doc | 28 Jul 20:41 2010

comments from an experienced programmer on ruby docs


Hey there, I am learning ruby for my hard drive backup project:

http://www.subspacefield.org/security/hdb/

Ruby is a cool language, but the documentation is a little hard to
read.  Many people use the term "Foo#whatever" with the assumption
that one knows what it means - I originally assumed it was an instance
method, but now believe it is a class method.  Since it's a special
character, you can't really search google for it easily.

Regarding http://rubylearning.com/: the formatting of the text boxes
is awful, since at least on my computer, it requires manually scrolling
every one, effectively peering at the program through a tiny viewport.
The content, however, is very good.

One thing that needs discussion is how everything except ints and
floats (and perhaps some other types) are passed by reference.  I got
really bit by passing strings into constructors, and the constructor
later modified the string, and that changed the value of the thing I
passed in.  This is true for arrays as well, and any user-defined
objects.  Since this is a change from how many other scripting
languages work, you should point it out a little better (it is hinted
at).  In essence, you'll want to dup any parameter before modifying it
(unless again it is an integer or float).  I assume these are the
objects that correspond to "what fits in a register" in C.  I make it
a practice to dup everything that gets passed into a constructor.  In
any case, this is a lot closer to C than I expected.

Regarding:
(Continue reading)


Gmane