stephen sefick | 1 Dec 03:14 2008
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Re: chron and R 2.8

Yes
chron 2.3-25
zoo 1.5-4
R 2.8
Mac OS X 10.5.5

Gabor I don't know how to start up another verison of R on the mac.  I
will figure this out, and get back to you (I can then test both of
them side by side).

other fast installation (version numbers from description files in R
2.7.2 directory)
chron 2.3-24
zoo 1.5-4
Mac OS X 10.5.5

thanks

Stephen

On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 10:19 AM, Gabor Grothendieck
<ggrothendieck <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> Are you using the same version of chron both times?
>
> On Sat, Nov 29, 2008 at 10:05 AM, stephen sefick <ssefick <at> gmail.com> wrote:
>> has anyone had problems with the upgrade to R 2.8 and chron date
>> classes.  I have a large zoo object that has a chron index, and it is
>> taking 5x or so longer to do the same calculation as with 2.7 if it
>> doesn't fail.  I will provide anything necessary I am not entirely
>> sure what ya'll would need if anything to try and reproduce the
(Continue reading)

Gabor Grothendieck | 1 Dec 04:04 2008
Picon

Re: chron and R 2.8

To run the old version of chron that you have under 2.7.2
into 2.8.0, on 2.7.2 issue the command (note initial dot):

.libPaths()

Suppose you find that the library that contains chron in
2.7.2 is "/a/b".

Then on 2.8.0 ensure that you don't have chron on the search path

search()

and if you do detach it:

detach("package:chron")
search() # should no longer be there

Then run this where "..." is the library that the old version of chron
is in under 2.7.2.

library(chron, lib = "...")

To run the new version of chron detach the old version and just use:

library(chron)

On Sun, Nov 30, 2008 at 9:14 PM, stephen sefick <ssefick <at> gmail.com> wrote:
> Yes
> chron 2.3-25
> zoo 1.5-4
(Continue reading)

Mike Lawrence | 1 Dec 04:15 2008

Re: Randomization of a two-way ANOVA?

The code below may not be the most optimized, but it should do the trick.
I've implemented the permutation test, which by some nomenclatures is
distinguished from the randomization test in that the latter is exhaustive
while the former is not.

I'm eager to hear the views of the list on whether the permutation test
fares when you use a parametric stat like the F as the focal statistic. I
know that David Howell introduction to the test employs the F (
http://www.uvm.edu/~dhowell/StatPages/Resampling/Resampling.html). I
personally think that in cases of known violation of normality and/or
homogeneity of variance, it seems odd to incorporate MSerror into the focal
statistic. I look forward to the list educating me if this view turns out to
be uninformed.

#make sure the factors are treated as such
FactorA = factor(FactorA)
FactorB = factor(FactorB)

#get the observed Fs
obs.aov = aov(Resp~FactorA*FactorB)
obs.mainA.F = summary(obs.aov)[[1]]$F[1]
obs.mainB.F = summary(obs.aov)[[1]]$F[2]
obs.AbyB.F = summary(obs.aov)[[1]]$F[3]

#prepare for the permutation loop
perms = 1e4
perm.mainA.F = rep(NA,perms)
perm.mainB.F = rep(NA,perms)
perm.AbyB.F = rep(NA,perms)

(Continue reading)

Duncan Temple Lang | 1 Dec 04:19 2008
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Re: Examples of advanced data visualization


Hans W. Borchers wrote:
> Dear R-help,
> 
> I am looking for ideas and presentations of new and advanced data visualization
> methods. As an example of what I am searching for, the 'Many Eyes' pages at
> 
>     http://manyeyes.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/
> 
> may provide a good paradigm. I would be interested even if it will not be easy
> to implement such examples in R, e.g. because of the interactive nature of these
> graphical displays.
> 

A few days before your mail, I started putting together some
examples of using R and SVG/ECMAScript and R and 
Flash/Flex/MXML/ActionScript.

There are some examples of R graphics that provide interactivity in 
various forms and ways at

    http://www.omegahat.org/SVGAnnoation/tests/examples.html

(Most examples will work with Firefox, Opera is the most
comprehensive browser however for these examples.)

The Flex.... examples will take more time.

  D.

(Continue reading)

Dylan Beaudette | 1 Dec 04:23 2008
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explaining a model with rcs() terms

Hi, I am using the rcs() function in the Design library to model
non-linearity that is not well characterized by an otherwise
mechanistic function. I am able to make the model 'available' to
others through the excellent nomogram() function and the set of tables
that it can create. However, I would like to present the model in an
'expanded' format-- probably what rcspline.restate() or latex.Design()
produce on a model fit object.

Here is how the model was fit:

fit.ols <- ols( log(k) ~ (rcs(activity) * (log(conc) + sar)) +
(rcs(sand) * (log(conc) + sar)), data=sm.clean, x=TRUE, y=TRUE)

Here is how I am accessing the 'expanded' format of the model structure:

options(digits=3)
latex(fit.ols, file='fit_rcs.tex')

The output contains several notation elements that I am not familiar with:

1. x_{+}  --> it seems that this represent a term that should be set
to 0, when x is 0?
i.e.  the entire expression   −453(activity − 0.842)_{+}^{3}  = 0 when
'activity' = 0 ??

2. the '!x' found in :

+log(conc) [ −0.0118sand + 9.58
! ×
!10−6 (sand − 11.6)
(Continue reading)

Andrew Choens | 1 Dec 04:41 2008
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How to make a banner table.

I have a dataframe with the following variables:

idnum	area	gender	race	etc.

I would like to make a table that looks like

area	gender	race
	M  F	B W A
1	4  5	3 5 1
2	6  7    4 6 3

etc.

Basically, I want to make a single broad table with a number of sub-set
tables. I have tried:

cbind(table(area, gender), table(area, race))

But, when I do this, I lose the labels gender / race. This makes it a
lot harder to understand my factor labels. when I use cbind, I get this:

M  F B W A
1 4  5 3 5 1
2 6  7 4 6 3

Although, it is technically correct, I really want to keep my factor
labels. I also tried this with xtabs and get the same results. Any
ideas? I saw a relatively recent thread asking a similar question, but
the proposed solution did not work for me, so I thought I would ask the
questions again.
(Continue reading)

Duncan Temple Lang | 1 Dec 04:44 2008
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Re: Examples of advanced data visualization


Sorry for the need for a second mail, but the URL missed a 't'

   http://www.omegahat.org/SVGAnnotation/tests/examples.html

                                  ^

Duncan Temple Lang wrote:
> 
> 
> Hans W. Borchers wrote:
>> Dear R-help,
>>
>> I am looking for ideas and presentations of new and advanced data 
>> visualization
>> methods. As an example of what I am searching for, the 'Many Eyes' 
>> pages at
>>
>>     http://manyeyes.alphaworks.ibm.com/manyeyes/
>>
>> may provide a good paradigm. I would be interested even if it will not 
>> be easy
>> to implement such examples in R, e.g. because of the interactive 
>> nature of these
>> graphical displays.
>>
> 
> 
> A few days before your mail, I started putting together some
> examples of using R and SVG/ECMAScript and R and 
(Continue reading)

David Winsemius | 1 Dec 04:57 2008
Picon
Picon

Re: explaining a model with rcs() terms


On Nov 30, 2008, at 10:23 PM, Dylan Beaudette wrote:

> Hi, I am using the rcs() function in the Design library to model
> non-linearity that is not well characterized by an otherwise
> mechanistic function. I am able to make the model 'available' to
> others through the excellent nomogram() function and the set of tables
> that it can create. However, I would like to present the model in an
> 'expanded' format-- probably what rcspline.restate() or latex.Design()
> produce on a model fit object.
>
> Here is how the model was fit:
>
> fit.ols <- ols( log(k) ~ (rcs(activity) * (log(conc) + sar)) +
> (rcs(sand) * (log(conc) + sar)), data=sm.clean, x=TRUE, y=TRUE)
>
> Here is how I am accessing the 'expanded' format of the model  
> structure:
>
> options(digits=3)
> latex(fit.ols, file='fit_rcs.tex')
>
> The output contains several notation elements that I am not familiar  
> with:
>
> 1. x_{+}  --> it seems that this represent a term that should be set
> to 0, when x is 0?

It is set to zero when the term inside the cubic is less than zero.  
See pages 20-21 of Harrell's book where the basis functions are  
(Continue reading)

Jinsong Zhao | 1 Dec 05:00 2008
Picon

Re: how to input a string without quote

> Wow, you are so lazy... But sometimes R is just designed for lazy guys...
> 
> ##
> f = function(a) {
>     s = substitute(a)
>     as.character(s)
> }
> ##
> 
>> f(a = asdf)
> [1] "asdf"
>> f(qwer)
> [1] "qwer"
> 
> 
> Regards,
> Yihui
> --
> Yihui Xie <xieyihui <at> gmail.com>
> Phone: +86-(0)10-82509086 Fax: +86-(0)10-82509086
> Mobile: +86-15810805877
> Homepage: http://www.yihui.name
> School of Statistics, Room 1037, Mingde Main Building,
> Renmin University of China, Beijing, 100872, China
> 

Thanks!

However,
 > f(012345)
(Continue reading)

Gibson, Tyler F | 1 Dec 02:02 2008
Picon

Attempting to get a STELLA model into R

To whomever may be of help,

I am a student in a graduate modeling class at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. I am trying to
get a STELLA model converted into R. I am in the process of trying to 're-write' the script into R, but I seem
to be missing pieces (i.e. parm values) that are keeping me from being able to replicate this model into R.
Does anyone have an idea of a possible solution to my problem? Are there conversion programs or packages
available that can convert STELLA models into R format?

Thank you very much for you time, and I hope to hear back from you soon.

-Tyler Gibson

tfg5854 <at> uncw.edu
______________________________________________
R-help <at> r-project.org mailing list
https://stat.ethz.ch/mailman/listinfo/r-help
PLEASE do read the posting guide http://www.R-project.org/posting-guide.html
and provide commented, minimal, self-contained, reproducible code.


Gmane