kar | 29 Mar 01:00 2012
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Re: go1 released

Congratulations!

On Thursday, March 29, 2012 12:03:41 AM UTC+8, Andrew Gerrand wrote:

We've just tagged a new Go release: go1.

Go 1 is a major release of Go that will be stable in the long term.
It is intended that programs written for Go 1 will continue to compile
and run correctly, unchanged, under future versions of Go 1.

The Go 1 release notes list the significant changes since the last
release and explain how to update your code:
        http://golang.org/doc/go1.html

To learn about the future of Go 1, read the Go 1 compatibility document:
        http://golang.org/doc/go1compat.html

Go 1 is available as binary distributions for the
FreeBSD, Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows operating systems.
To install a binary distribution, follow these instructions:
        http://golang.org/doc/install

If you prefer to build from source, follow these instructions:
        http://golang.org/doc/install/source

The Go team would like to thank all our contributors from the open
source community. We could not have done it without their help.
See the full list of contributors here: http://golang.org/CONTRIBUTORS

We also thank our users. We hope you enjoy Go 1.

Have fun. (And tell your friends! ;-)

Andrew

Archos | 29 Mar 01:03 2012

Re: Go is not good at..


On Mar 28, 9:46 pm, Amitabh Arya <amitabhary...@...> wrote:
> >> All go documents written out there, are for high level programmers like
>
> some one should already know c, or c++ to understand some of those docs. It
> should be like any one who is working in html/JS/Flash/php or something can
> understand it.
This is a great and simple tutorial:

http://go-book.appspot.com/

Peter Kleiweg | 29 Mar 01:05 2012
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Re: go-charset: new version


On Mar 29, 12:05 am, roger peppe <rogpe...@...> wrote:
> On 28 March 2012 19:32, Peter Kleiweg <pklei...@...> wrote:
>
> > With go version weekly.2012-03-27:
>
> > ~ go install code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset
>
> thanks for the feedback.
>
> if you try this instead, what does it print?
>
> go get -u code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset

The same.

And with some extra options I get this:

~ go get -u -v -x code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset
code.google.com/p/go-charset (download)
cd .
hg clone -U https://code.google.com/p/go-charset /my/opt/go/src/pkg/
code.google.com/p/go-charset
cd /my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset
hg tags
cd /my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset
hg branches
cd /my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset
hg update -r go.weekly.2012-03-22
WORK=/tmp/go-build765164966
code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset
mkdir -p $WORK/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/_obj/
cd /my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset
/my/opt/go/pkg/tool/linux_amd64/6g -o $WORK/code.google.com/p/go-
charset/charset/_obj/_go_.6 -p code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset -D
_/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset -I $WORK ./
big5.go ./charset.go ./codepage.go ./cp932.go ./file.go ./utf16.go ./
utf8.go
# code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/big5.go:9:
undefined: registerClass
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/big5.go:73:
undefined: cache
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/charset.go:55:
undefined: localFactory
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/codepage.go:9:
undefined: registerClass
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/codepage.go:
78: undefined: cache
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/codepage.go:
98: undefined: cache
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/cp932.go:9:
undefined: registerClass
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/cp932.go:114:
undefined: cache
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/utf16.go:10:
undefined: registerClass
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/utf8.go:8:
undefined: registerClass
/my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset/charset/utf8.go:8: too
many errors

~ go get -u -v -x code.google.com/p/go-charset
code.google.com/p/go-charset (download)
cd /my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset
hg pull
cd /my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset
hg tags
cd /my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset
hg branches
cd /my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset
hg update -r go.weekly.2012-03-22
package code.google.com/p/go-charset
        imports code.google.com/p/go-charset
        imports code.google.com/p/go-charset: no Go source files in /
my/opt/go/src/pkg/code.google.com/p/go-charset

kortschak | 29 Mar 01:09 2012
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Re: Go is not good at..

On Thursday, March 29, 2012 7:16:35 AM UTC+10:30, Amitabh Arya wrote:

>> All go documents written out there, are for high level programmers like some one should already know c, or c++ to understand some of those docs. It should be like any one who is working in html/JS/Flash/php or something can understand it.

I've found the documentation to be some of the clearest and easiest to understand that I've ever come across. While I have some experience C/C++ I am by no means fluent in either - yet I have no problems with the docs. I think that because of the nature of idiomatic Go code being what it is, in most cases reading the docs in conj unction with the source - facilitated by godoc - is the way to understand the expected use and behaviour. The increasing use of examples in the docs also is a help.
brainman | 29 Mar 01:13 2012
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Re: Go is not good at..

On Thursday, March 29, 2012 9:49:55 AM UTC+11, Guillermo Estrada wrote:


I saw this one too, but I didn't use it because it needs pkg-config

# pkg-config --cflags sqlite3
exec: "pkg-config": executable file not found in %PATH% 


 I think there are 2 problems here as far as https://github.com/mattn/go-sqlite3 on windows is concerned:

1) There is no documentation on how to build the package. When the package is pure go, that is OK. But this package is not. It involves downloading all sqlite source (C) and building it into a form usable for cgo. This will require tools that are not available on standard Windows pc. It is completely unrealistic to expect average Windows user work it all out on their own.

2) I do not use sqlite with Go. But I use it with other languages. And the way I access sqlite functionality is by employing a sqlite dll (http://www.sqlite.org/download.html). Perhaps we can provide similar functionality. The advantage here will be that driver will be pure Go - do not need mingw and friends. Deployment would be harder - you would have to make sure to delpoy sqlite dll. But that is sometimes acceptable. Perhaps, "use sqlite dll" mode can be incorporated into existing driver, so it is a matter of recompiling your program to switch from one mode to the other.

Alex
Sindre Myren | 29 Mar 01:18 2012
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Re: Integer Division and Modulo as a single operator?



Den 20:57 28. mars 2012 skrev Kyle Lemons <kevlar-hpIqsD4AKlfQT0dZR+AlfA@public.gmane.org> følgende:
On Wed, Mar 28, 2012 at 11:56 AM, Kyle Lemons <kevlar-hpIqsD4AKlfQT0dZR+AlfA@public.gmane.org> wrote:
On Tue, Mar 27, 2012 at 6:23 PM, Ian Lance Taylor <iant-hpIqsD4AKlfQT0dZR+AlfA@public.gmane.org> wrote:
Sindre Myren <smyrman-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org> writes:

> Den 02:58 28. mars 2012 skrev Ian Lance Taylor <iant-hpIqsD4AKlfQT0dZR+AlfA@public.gmane.org> følgende:
>
>> Sindre Myren <smyrman-Re5JQEeQqe8AvxtiuMwx3w@public.gmane.org> writes:
>>
>> > A seperate operator set should be used if this where to be implemented.
>> For
>> > instance:
>> >
>> > sum, overflow := a +% b
>> > difference, underflow := a -% b
>> > product, high_product := a *% b
>> > quotient, remainder := a /% b
>> >
>> > or something like that..
>>
>> Why don't we just write some ordinary functions?
>>
>>
> Like this?
>
> sum, overflow := AddWithOverflow(a, b)
> difference, underflow := SubtractWithUnderFlow(a , b)
> product, high_product := MultiplicationWithHighProduct(a, b)
> quotient, remainder := DivisionWithRemainder(a, b)

Yes.

Unfortunately, this requires one function per operation (4) per signedness (2) per bit width (4), so 32 different functions, unless I'm missing something.  Otherwise you miss out entirely on the point of the second operands.

Oh, I forgot about float32 and float64 and possibly complex64 and complex128 (I'm not sure if they make sense).


overflow, underflow and high_product makes sense for floats as well (http://steve.hollasch.net/cgindex/coding/ieeefloat.html). The reminder probably does not.

If implemented in the asembler, I guess the functions could be written to support several int types, and I guess float as well. Though if implemented as functions, my personal belief, is that programeres would rather use the old operators, as in a programmers head, operators are faster then function calls.

Also, if I was to present to my friends the awesome and unique operator functionality of Go 1.1, the conversation would go:
Me: "Check out this awesome operators in Go 1.1! They give you both the quotient and the reminder in one operation!"
Mate: "Awesome"

If it was implemented as functions, the conversation would go like:
Me: "Look, there is a function in Go that gives you the quotient and the reminder in one operation!"
Mate: "Cool"

In other words, just a little bit less awesome.
kar | 29 Mar 01:19 2012
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Re: go1 released

Congratulations to Go team and contributors.


1 question, does this mean Go is now officially supported by google and no longer experimental?

On Thursday, March 29, 2012 12:03:41 AM UTC+8, Andrew Gerrand wrote:
We've just tagged a new Go release: go1.

Go 1 is a major release of Go that will be stable in the long term.
It is intended that programs written for Go 1 will continue to compile
and run correctly, unchanged, under future versions of Go 1.

The Go 1 release notes list the significant changes since the last
release and explain how to update your code:
        http://golang.org/doc/go1.html

To learn about the future of Go 1, read the Go 1 compatibility document:
        http://golang.org/doc/go1compat.html

Go 1 is available as binary distributions for the
FreeBSD, Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows operating systems.
To install a binary distribution, follow these instructions:
        http://golang.org/doc/install

If you prefer to build from source, follow these instructions:
        http://golang.org/doc/install/source

The Go team would like to thank all our contributors from the open
source community. We could not have done it without their help.
See the full list of contributors here: http://golang.org/CONTRIBUTORS

We also thank our users. We hope you enjoy Go 1.

Have fun. (And tell your friends! ;-)

Andrew

Guillermo Estrada | 29 Mar 01:26 2012
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Re: Go is not good at..

On Wednesday, March 28, 2012 5:09:24 PM UTC-6, kortschak wrote:

On Thursday, March 29, 2012 7:16:35 AM UTC+10:30, Amitabh Arya wrote:
>> All go documents written out there, are for high level programmers like some one should already know c, or c++ to understand some of those docs. It should be like any one who is working in html/JS/Flash/php or something can understand it.

I've found the documentation to be some of the clearest and easiest to understand that I've ever come across. While I have some experience C/C++ I am by no means fluent in either - yet I have no problems with the docs. I think that because of the nature of idiomatic Go code being what it is, in most cases reading the docs in conjunction with the source - facilitated by godoc - is the way to understand the expected use and behaviour. The increasing use of examples in the docs also is a help.

Go documentation is great, and even better, reading the code to understand the standard library is pleasant. But I do have to say that documentation on cgo or how to build some libraries that expect you to have a full C toolchain, is lacky, and having to do that for a PHP or JS guy would be a no go, even more on Windows. I choose Go, because I wanted to run away from C as far as possible (at least that is my story), I dig Ruby, Python, PHP, Java, and I love Go! But I have to say that having to solve so many things before I can even try to start using OpenGL or SQLite or all sorts of things have been a pain in the ass, even more as a Windows dev. I know that D language has a project I used a lot, with the ability to load shared libraries at runtime and you only had to create the bindings to the library in D. It's called Derelict (http://www.dsource.org/projects/derelict). That truly made my life in D a bliss, I wrote bindings for SQLite, GLFW, BASS, and so on by just reading header files of those libraries and applying some rules to port them to D. Now I don't use D anymore in favor of Go, but that was an awesome way I could get going with most C libs. I wish that I can make something about that, but it would be awesome to have something to just load the shared library (.dll, .so, etc...) at runtime, then any .dll binary I download for windows can work without having to build every library myself.

This is not in anyway complaint or anything. I'm happy with Go, I love the language! I'm just sad I have to start installing and learning how to build and configure C after running so much from it, being on Windows just make it worse.
Miki Tebeka | 29 Mar 01:31 2012
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Re: [ANN] Selenium client 0.1.0

I'll have a look, though I'm a bit packed currently.
I've opened https://bitbucket.org/tebeka/selenium/issue/1 and will do my best to do that.

Pull requests are welcomed as well ;)

On Wednesday, March 28, 2012 1:47:06 PM UTC-7, Han-Wen Nienhuys wrote:

On Sun, Sep 4, 2011 at 10:18 PM, Miki Tebeka> wrote:
> Greetings,
>
> It's very easy to create web applications in Go, now it's also easy to test
> them.
> You can find code for selenium client (remote) version 0.1.0 at
> https://bitbucket.org/tebeka/selenium/src.
>
> You should be able to "goinstall bitbucket.org/tebeka/selenium".
> You can see usage examples in "test_remote.go".
>
> This is my first Go project that is more than a toy. Comment, reviews, bug
> reports are more than welcomed.
>
> Happy Testing,

I've been toying with this, and it looks really nice.  One small
comment: could the timeouts use time.Duration rather than hardcoded
milliseconds?

--
Han-Wen Nienhuys
Google Engineering Belo Horizonte

John Asmuth | 29 Mar 01:31 2012
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Re: a library in go - darts

Or go.darts if you want to follow the example set by go.net etc


Gmane