Blyth, Mike | 6 Jul 22:27 2011

Lastframe event not being detected in Chrome?

I’m a OpenLaszlo & JS newbie. I need to have a way to play audio clips in sequence and came up with a player that creates a frame for a clip, and at the end of the clip (based on the onlastframe event), destroys that frame and creates one for the next clip. In general, it works (code is below). However, when I use Chrome (12.0.742.112) to display the .swf file, only the first clip in the sequence plays. It appears that either the onlastframe event is not generated or it’s ignored. The correct sound plays but nothing else happens. This does not happen when I use Chrome browser with the local server (xampp). Firefox and Opera work, while IE8 doesn’t display the pictures (but that’s another issue).

 

The example is at http://bit.ly/pP0wlW and includes the debugger. When working (as it should in Firefox), clicking on the correct picture yields a green checkmark, a “ding” or a sentence in Hausa, and advance to a new set of pictures. Clicking on an incorrect answer should yield a red error mark, the spoken words ‘ah-ah’, and a repeat of the original prompt. When not working (Chrome), the marks work as do the first ding or words, but the other actions do not occur.

 

Any ideas? Thanks!

 

 

--Mike Blyth

 

Source for the sequential clip player:

 

  <class name='SequencePlayer' >

                <attribute name='resourceBase' value='' type='string' />

                <attribute name='clips' type='expression' />

                <attribute name='clip_play' type='expression' />

                <method name='load' args='newClips'>

                                this.clips=newClips

                                Debug.debug('SP loaded '+this.clips)

                </method>

                <method name='loadError' args='ignore=null'>

                                Debug.debug('Error loading!')

                                this.play()

                </method>

                <method name='myplay' args='ignore=null' >

                                Debug.debug('...play...')

                                if (this.clip_play != undefined) {this.clip_play.destroy()}

                                var i, next_clip=this.clips.shift()

                                Debug.debug('next_clip='+next_clip)

                                if (next_clip==undefined) {

                                                this.onlastframe.sendEvent()

                                                return

                                }

                                for (i=0;i&lt;300;i++){} // some timing problem needs slight delay

                                this.clip_play = new lz.view(canvas, {

                                                resource:'http:' + resourceBase + next_clip + '.mp3' }); 

                                new lz.Delegate(this, 'myplay', this.clip_play, 'onlastframe')

                                new lz.Delegate(this, 'loadError', this.clip_play, 'onerror')

                                Debug.debug('playing '+next_clip)

                </method>

  </class>

 

Amy Muntz | 15 Jul 21:30 2011

10,000th Jira Item

It seems that somewhere we should mark the event of the 10,000th JIRA issue being filed yesterday. That's a lot of issues, a lot of new features, and a lot of improvements. It also represents a lot of fixes, contributions, and hard work. What a ride!

I still remember when we moved to JIRA in 2005. We were just getting ready to release OpenLaszlo 3.0. In fact, we were doing our second and final beta release in advance of OpenLaszlo 3.0. The very first JIRA task we filed was to implement dynamic libraries (http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-1), followed by the implementation of SOLO mode (http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-2) or serverless deployment as we called it back then. We've come so far!

From then until now, over 6 years have passed and OpenLaszlo has been fortunate to have the expertise and contributions of so many talented developers and contributors. To all of you out there that have supported OpenLaszlo and come along for the ride - thank you! 

And now, it's onward to HTML5... and another 10,000.

Best,
Amy

P T Withington | 15 Jul 21:39 2011
Picon

Re: [Laszlo-user] 10,000th Jira Item

W00t!  (I think).  Hopefully most of those 10,000 are fixed.  :)

On 2011-07-15, at 12:30, Amy Muntz wrote:

> It seems that somewhere we should mark the event of the 10,000th JIRA issue
> being filed yesterday. That's a lot of issues, a lot of new features, and a
> lot of improvements. It also represents a lot of fixes, contributions, and
> hard work. What a ride!
> 
> I still remember when we moved to JIRA in 2005. We were just getting ready
> to release OpenLaszlo 3.0. In fact, we were doing our second and final beta
> release in advance of OpenLaszlo 3.0. The very first JIRA task we filed was
> to implement dynamic libraries (http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-1),
> followed by the implementation of SOLO mode (
> http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-2) or serverless deployment as we
> called it back then. We've come so far!
> 
>> From then until now, over 6 years have passed and OpenLaszlo has been
> fortunate to have the expertise and contributions of so many talented
> developers and contributors. To all of you out there that have supported
> OpenLaszlo and come along for the ride - thank you!
> 
> And now, it's onward to HTML5... and another 10,000.
> 
> Best,
> Amy

James Robey | 15 Jul 21:42 2011
Picon

Re: 10,000th Jira Item

	Bravo! If I can speak for others, we are amazed at the resiliency of the Laszlo framework and it's continued
relevancy. I discovered it in 2006 as a way to make applications without cross platform headaches and have
recommended it to everyone I've met along the way since. I'd say "May I live to see the 100,000th" but i
believe it will take much less then that to keep Laszlo working great. Carry on!

James Robey 
Laszlo Enthusiast, Denver, Colorado

On Jul 15, 2011, at 1:30 PM, Amy Muntz wrote:

> It seems that somewhere we should mark the event of the 10,000th JIRA issue
> being filed yesterday. That's a lot of issues, a lot of new features, and a
> lot of improvements. It also represents a lot of fixes, contributions, and
> hard work. What a ride!
> 
> I still remember when we moved to JIRA in 2005. We were just getting ready
> to release OpenLaszlo 3.0. In fact, we were doing our second and final beta
> release in advance of OpenLaszlo 3.0. The very first JIRA task we filed was
> to implement dynamic libraries (http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-1),
> followed by the implementation of SOLO mode (
> http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-2) or serverless deployment as we
> called it back then. We've come so far!
> 
>> From then until now, over 6 years have passed and OpenLaszlo has been
> fortunate to have the expertise and contributions of so many talented
> developers and contributors. To all of you out there that have supported
> OpenLaszlo and come along for the ride - thank you!
> 
> And now, it's onward to HTML5... and another 10,000.
> 
> Best,
> Amy

Amy Muntz | 21 Jul 19:09 2011

Re: [Laszlo-dev] OpenLaszlo terminology - what does the term "runtime" apply to?

Traditionally in OpenLaszlo, the "runtime" has meant the target platform - SWF9, SWF10, DHTML, HTML5, etc.. The browser was never part of that definition. You are correct that the debugger information seems reversed - the "runtime" either the swf or javascript runtimes,  while the browser information and mobile environments should be the "target".

I've filed a JIRA bug: http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-10010 to track this.

Amy

On Thu, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:32 PM, Raju Bitter <r.bitter.mailinglists-gM/Ye1E23mwN+BqQ9rBEUg@public.gmane.org> wrote:
After using OL for so many years, I still think that the term
"runtime" is used to describe different things within the project.

First, the Wikipedia definitions listed: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Runtime
1) Run time (program lifecycle phase), the period during which a
computer program is executing
2) Run-time system, software designed to support the execution of
computer programs
3) Runtime library, a program library designed to implement functions
built into a programming language

On the OL website, runtime seems to be mainly used to describe the
target platform for generated code or bytecode, as can be seen here:
http://www.openlaszlo.org/legals
"OpenLaszlo 4, the OpenLaszlo architecture has been remodularized into
a true multi-runtime platform. OpenLaszlo uses standard ECMAScript
Release 3 with some ECMAScript Release 4 extensions as its scripting
language. The compiler translates this script to an intermediate
language that is then processed by multiple back-ends to translate
into an appropriate format for the destination runtime (e.g., SWF
byte-codes, or compressed Javascript 1.4)."

In the "architecture" diagram, Flash 7, Flash 8, and DHTML are
runtimes. That would mean, "runtime" refers to the runtime system in
OL's case.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Run-time_system
"A run-time system (also called runtime system or just runtime) is
software designed to support the execution of computer programs
written in some computer language. The run-time system contains
implementations of basic low-level commands and may also implement
higher-level commands and may support type checking, debugging, and
even code generation and optimization.

Some services of the run-time system are accessible to the programmer
through an application programming interface, but other services (such
as task scheduling and resource management) may be inaccessible."

The version information in the debugger lists the "runtime" as
"Target", and the runtime refers to the either the Flash Player
version, or the browser version used. That doesn't seem to be
consistent, since there is no Safari or Firefox runtime. The browser
or the Flash Player are runtime environments.

lzx> Debug.versionInfo()
URL: http://localhost:8080/trunk/some.lzx
LPS
 Version: 5.0.x.0
 Release: Latest
 Build: 19258 /Users/raju/src/svn/openlaszlo/trunk
 Date: 2011-07-14T09:34:04Z
Application
 Date: 2011-07-21T16:17:03Z
Target: dhtml
Runtime: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_8)
AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/12.0.742.122
Safari/534.30
OS: MacIntel

Would you agree with that definition, or what are your thoughts?

Donald Anderson | 21 Jul 21:05 2011

Re: OpenLaszlo terminology - what does the term "runtime" apply to?

Raju,

I don't know if you're tracking the JIRA, but I propose this modification from your suggestion.  Shown first for swf10:

lzx> Debug.versionInfo() 
URL: http://127.0.0.1:8080/trunk-f/test/LPP-10001.lzx?lzt=swf&lzoptions=runtime%28swf10%29%2Cproxied%28true%29%2Cdebug%28true%29 
LPS 
  Version: 5.0.x.0 
  Release: Latest 
  Build: 19291 /Users/clients/laszlo/src/svn/openlaszlo/trunk-f 
  Date: 2011-07-21T18:15:07Z 
Application 
  Date: 2011-07-21T18:29:02Z 
Runtime: swf10 
Browser/Player 
  Version: 10.3.181.14 
OS: Mac OS 10.6.7 
  
and running with dhtml: 

lzx> Debug.versionInfo() 
URL: http://127.0.0.1:8080/trunk-f/test/LPP-10001.lzx?lzt=object&lzoptions=runtime%28dhtml%29%2Cproxied%28true%29%2Cdebug%28true%29 
LPS 
  Version: 5.0.x.0 
  Release: Latest 
  Build: 19291 /Users/clients/laszlo/src/svn/openlaszlo/trunk-f 
  Date: 2011-07-21T18:15:07Z 
Application 
  Date: 2011-07-21T18:23:45Z 
Runtime: dhtml 
Browser/Player 
  Version: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10.6; en-US; rv:1.9.2.19) Gecko/20110707 Firefox/3.6.19 
OS: MacIntel 

I was hoping that would make things clearer.  What do you think?  If you have feedback, please comment in the JIRA if you can: http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-10010

Thanks,

- Don

On Jul 21, 2011, at 1:09 PM, Amy Muntz wrote:

Traditionally in OpenLaszlo, the "runtime" has meant the target platform - SWF9, SWF10, DHTML, HTML5, etc.. The browser was never part of that definition. You are correct that the debugger information seems reversed - the "runtime" either the swf or javascript runtimes,  while the browser information and mobile environments should be the "target".

I've filed a JIRA bug: http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-10010 to track this.

Amy

On Thu, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:32 PM, Raju Bitter <r.bitter.mailinglists <at> googlemail.com> wrote:
After using OL for so many years, I still think that the term
"runtime" is used to describe different things within the project.

First, the Wikipedia definitions listed: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Runtime
1) Run time (program lifecycle phase), the period during which a
computer program is executing
2) Run-time system, software designed to support the execution of
computer programs
3) Runtime library, a program library designed to implement functions
built into a programming language

On the OL website, runtime seems to be mainly used to describe the
target platform for generated code or bytecode, as can be seen here:
http://www.openlaszlo.org/legals
"OpenLaszlo 4, the OpenLaszlo architecture has been remodularized into
a true multi-runtime platform. OpenLaszlo uses standard ECMAScript
Release 3 with some ECMAScript Release 4 extensions as its scripting
language. The compiler translates this script to an intermediate
language that is then processed by multiple back-ends to translate
into an appropriate format for the destination runtime (e.g., SWF
byte-codes, or compressed Javascript 1.4)."

In the "architecture" diagram, Flash 7, Flash 8, and DHTML are
runtimes. That would mean, "runtime" refers to the runtime system in
OL's case.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Run-time_system
"A run-time system (also called runtime system or just runtime) is
software designed to support the execution of computer programs
written in some computer language. The run-time system contains
implementations of basic low-level commands and may also implement
higher-level commands and may support type checking, debugging, and
even code generation and optimization.

Some services of the run-time system are accessible to the programmer
through an application programming interface, but other services (such
as task scheduling and resource management) may be inaccessible."

The version information in the debugger lists the "runtime" as
"Target", and the runtime refers to the either the Flash Player
version, or the browser version used. That doesn't seem to be
consistent, since there is no Safari or Firefox runtime. The browser
or the Flash Player are runtime environments.

lzx> Debug.versionInfo()
URL: http://localhost:8080/trunk/some.lzx
LPS
 Version: 5.0.x.0
 Release: Latest
 Build: 19258 /Users/raju/src/svn/openlaszlo/trunk
 Date: 2011-07-14T09:34:04Z
Application
 Date: 2011-07-21T16:17:03Z
Target: dhtml
Runtime: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_8)
AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/12.0.742.122
Safari/534.30
OS: MacIntel

Would you agree with that definition, or what are your thoughts?



--

Don Anderson
Java/C/C++, Berkeley DB, systems consultant

voice: 617-306-2057
email: dda <at> ddanderson.com
www: http://www.ddanderson.com
blog: http://libdb.wordpress.com





Raju Bitter | 21 Jul 22:13 2011

Re: [Laszlo-dev] OpenLaszlo terminology - what does the term "runtime" apply to?

Thanks for your quick response. I commented the JIRA.

"Yes, that makes things much clearer. +1 from me."

On Thu, Jul 21, 2011 at 9:05 PM, Donald Anderson <dda@...> wrote:
> Raju,
> I don't know if you're tracking the JIRA, but I propose this modification
> from your suggestion.  Shown first for swf10:
> lzx> Debug.versionInfo()
> URL: http://127.0.0.1:8080/trunk-f/test/LPP-10001.lzx?lzt=swf&lzoptions=runtime%28swf10%29%2Cproxied%28true%29%2Cdebug%28true%29
> LPS
>   Version: 5.0.x.0
>   Release: Latest
>   Build: 19291 /Users/clients/laszlo/src/svn/openlaszlo/trunk-f
>   Date: 2011-07-21T18:15:07Z
> Application
>   Date: 2011-07-21T18:29:02Z
> Runtime: swf10
> Browser/Player
>   Version: 10.3.181.14
> OS: Mac OS 10.6.7
>
> and running with dhtml:
>
> lzx> Debug.versionInfo()
> URL: http://127.0.0.1:8080/trunk-f/test/LPP-10001.lzx?lzt=object&lzoptions=runtime%28dhtml%29%2Cproxied%28true%29%2Cdebug%28true%29
> LPS
>   Version: 5.0.x.0
>   Release: Latest
>   Build: 19291 /Users/clients/laszlo/src/svn/openlaszlo/trunk-f
>   Date: 2011-07-21T18:15:07Z
> Application
>   Date: 2011-07-21T18:23:45Z
> Runtime: dhtml
> Browser/Player
>   Version: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; Intel Mac OS X 10.6; en-US;
> rv:1.9.2.19) Gecko/20110707 Firefox/3.6.19
> OS: MacIntel
> I was hoping that would make things clearer.  What do you think?  If you
> have feedback, please comment in the JIRA if you
> can: http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-10010
> Thanks,
> - Don
> On Jul 21, 2011, at 1:09 PM, Amy Muntz wrote:
>
> Traditionally in OpenLaszlo, the "runtime" has meant the target platform -
> SWF9, SWF10, DHTML, HTML5, etc.. The browser was never part of that
> definition. You are correct that the debugger information seems reversed -
> the "runtime" either the swf or javascript runtimes,  while the browser
> information and mobile environments should be the "target".
>
> I've filed a JIRA bug: http://jira.openlaszlo.org/jira/browse/LPP-10010 to
> track this.
>
> Amy
>
> On Thu, Jul 21, 2011 at 12:32 PM, Raju Bitter
> <r.bitter.mailinglists@...> wrote:
>>
>> After using OL for so many years, I still think that the term
>> "runtime" is used to describe different things within the project.
>>
>> First, the Wikipedia definitions listed:
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Runtime
>> 1) Run time (program lifecycle phase), the period during which a
>> computer program is executing
>> 2) Run-time system, software designed to support the execution of
>> computer programs
>> 3) Runtime library, a program library designed to implement functions
>> built into a programming language
>>
>> On the OL website, runtime seems to be mainly used to describe the
>> target platform for generated code or bytecode, as can be seen here:
>> http://www.openlaszlo.org/legals
>> "OpenLaszlo 4, the OpenLaszlo architecture has been remodularized into
>> a true multi-runtime platform. OpenLaszlo uses standard ECMAScript
>> Release 3 with some ECMAScript Release 4 extensions as its scripting
>> language. The compiler translates this script to an intermediate
>> language that is then processed by multiple back-ends to translate
>> into an appropriate format for the destination runtime (e.g., SWF
>> byte-codes, or compressed Javascript 1.4)."
>>
>> In the "architecture" diagram, Flash 7, Flash 8, and DHTML are
>> runtimes. That would mean, "runtime" refers to the runtime system in
>> OL's case.
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Run-time_system
>> "A run-time system (also called runtime system or just runtime) is
>> software designed to support the execution of computer programs
>> written in some computer language. The run-time system contains
>> implementations of basic low-level commands and may also implement
>> higher-level commands and may support type checking, debugging, and
>> even code generation and optimization.
>>
>> Some services of the run-time system are accessible to the programmer
>> through an application programming interface, but other services (such
>> as task scheduling and resource management) may be inaccessible."
>>
>> The version information in the debugger lists the "runtime" as
>> "Target", and the runtime refers to the either the Flash Player
>> version, or the browser version used. That doesn't seem to be
>> consistent, since there is no Safari or Firefox runtime. The browser
>> or the Flash Player are runtime environments.
>>
>> lzx> Debug.versionInfo()
>> URL: http://localhost:8080/trunk/some.lzx
>> LPS
>>  Version: 5.0.x.0
>>  Release: Latest
>>  Build: 19258 /Users/raju/src/svn/openlaszlo/trunk
>>  Date: 2011-07-14T09:34:04Z
>> Application
>>  Date: 2011-07-21T16:17:03Z
>> Target: dhtml
>> Runtime: Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_6_8)
>> AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/12.0.742.122
>> Safari/534.30
>> OS: MacIntel
>>
>> Would you agree with that definition, or what are your thoughts?
>
>
>
> --
> Don Anderson
> Java/C/C++, Berkeley DB, systems consultant
>
> voice: 617-306-2057
> email: dda@...
> www: http://www.ddanderson.com
> blog: http://libdb.wordpress.com
>
>
>
>
>


Gmane