Fabio Crestani | 3 Jun 17:54 2004
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CFP: Workshop on Mobile and Ubiquitous Information Access

_______________________________________________________________________

         Workshop on MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS INFORMATION ACCESS
                   (http://www.cis.strath.ac.uk/muia04/)

          Mobile HCI 2004, September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK

                           CALL FOR PAPERS
_______________________________________________________________________

The ongoing migration of computing and information access from the
desktop and telephone to mobile computing devices such as PDAs, tablet
PCs, and next generation (G3) phones poses critical challenges for
research in information access and, in particular, for Information
Retrieval (IR). These devices offer limited screen size and no
keyboard or mouse, making complex graphical interfaces cumbersome. In
addition, these mobile devices will be used in situations involving
different physical and social environments and tasks, and they will
need to allow users to interact wherever he/she is and using whichever
mode or combination of modes are most appropriate given the situation,
their preferences and the task at hand. Furthermore, unlike
traditional library or office settings, users of mobile IR devices
will, typically, be subject to much higher levels of interruption and
task switching - thus needing very different interface designs.

The workshop aims to be a forum for the presentation of current
research and exchange of experiences into technological and usability
aspects of mobile information access.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:
(Continue reading)

Mark Greenwood | 3 Jun 19:15 2004
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SIGIR 2004 Workshop Final CFP: Information Retrieval for Question Answering (IR4QA)

                       Final Call for Papers

                        SIGIR'04 Workshop

           INFORMATION RETRIEVAL FOR QUESTION ANSWERING (IR4QA)

                   July 29, 2004, Sheffield, UK

Open domain question answering has become a very active research area
over the past few years, due in large measure to the stimulus of the
TREC Question Answering track. This track addresses the task of finding
*answers* to natural language (NL) questions (e.g. ``How tall is the
Eiffel Tower?" ``Who is Aaron Copland?'') from large text collections.
This task stands in contrast to the more conventional IR task of
retrieving *documents* relevant to a query, where the query may be
simply a collection of keywords (e.g. ``Eiffel Tower", ``American
composer, born Brooklyn NY 1900, ...'').

Finding answers requires processing texts at a level of detail that
cannot be carried out at retrieval time for very large text collections.
This limitation has led many researchers to propose, broadly, a two
stage approach to the QA task. In stage one a subset of query-relevant
texts are selected from the whole collection.  In stage two this subset
is subjected to detailed processing for answer extraction. To date stage
one has received limited explicit attention, despite its obvious
importance -- performance at stage two is bounded by performance at
stage one.  The goal of this workshop is to correct this situation, and,
hopefully, to draw attention of IR researchers to the specific
challenges raised by QA.

(Continue reading)

Doug Tudhope | 21 Jun 13:23 2004
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Call for presentations and participation at NKOS Workshop at ECD 2004, September 16, 2004, Bath, UK

Call for presentations and participation at NKOS Workshop at ECD 2004,
September 16, 2004, Bath, UK

User-centred approaches to Networked Knowledge Organization Systems/Services
(NKOS)

The objective of the 3rd European NKOS Workshop is to facilitate the
exchange of
viewpoints and ideas about topics and problems related to the development
and design of NKOS. The issues discussed may range from considerations
related to the role of KOS, conceptual content and design, methodological
issues, and technical issues (protocols and XML-RDF technologies).

The workshop is part of ECDL 2004 - http://www.ecdl2004.org/
although registration is also possible for the workshop alone.
Presentations from the Workshop may be selected for consideration
in a special issue of the Journal New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia
planned for 2005.

Call for presentations:
http://www2.db.dk/nkos-workshop/call%20for%20proposals.htm

Workshop web site:
http://www2.db.dk/nkos-workshop/

Workshop chairs:
Marianne Lykke, Department of Information Studies, Royal School of Library
and Information Science, Denmark

Douglas Tudhope, School of Computing, University of Glamorgan, Wales, UK
(Continue reading)

Prof Fabio Crestani | 21 Jun 17:26 2004
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CFP: ACM SAC Track on Information Access and Retrieval

 _______________________________________________________________________

        Special Track on: INFORMATION ACCESS AND RETRIEVAL
               http://www.cis.strath.ac.uk/SAC2005/
          2005 ACM Symposium on Applied Computing (SAC 2005)
                Santa Fe, New Mexico, March 13 -17, 2005
 _______________________________________________________________________

Over the past eighteen years, the ACM Symposium on Applied Computing
(SAC) has become a primary forum for applied computer scientists and
application developers from around the world to interact and present
their work. SAC 2005 is sponsored by the ACM Special Interest Group on
Applied Computing (SIGAPP): its proceedings are published by ACM in
both printed form and CD-ROM; they are also available on the web
through ACM's Digital Library. Visit the SAC 2005 home page for
further information: http://www.acm.org/conferences/sac/sac2005/

SPECIAL TRACK ON INFORMATION ACCESS AND RETRIEVAL (SAC-IAR)

Nowadays, one of the most important and challenging problems in
computer science is the definition of effective technologies, which
support access to information. With the expansion of the Internet
effective tools for finding relevant information are urgently
needed. This special track will be concerned with theory and, in
particular, applications of novel approaches to information access and
retrieval. The track has been successfully running within SAC since
2002.

Major topics of interest include (but are not limited to):

(Continue reading)

Fabio Crestani | 23 Jun 19:03 2004
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CFP: Workshop on Mobile and Ubiquitous Information Access

_______________________________________________________________________

         Workshop on MOBILE AND UBIQUITOUS INFORMATION ACCESS
                   (http://www.cis.strath.ac.uk/muia04/)

          Mobile HCI 2004, September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK

                           CALL FOR PAPERS
_______________________________________________________________________

The ongoing migration of computing and information access from the desktop
and telephone to mobile computing devices such as PDAs, tablet PCs, and next
generation (G3) phones poses critical challenges for research in information
access and, in particular, for Information Retrieval (IR). These devices
offer limited screen size and no keyboard or mouse, making complex graphical
interfaces cumbersome. In addition, these mobile devices will be used in
situations involving different physical and social environments and tasks,
and they will need to allow users to interact wherever he/she is and using
whichever mode or combination of modes are most appropriate given the
situation, their preferences and the task at hand. Furthermore, unlike
traditional library or office settings, users of mobile IR devices will,
typically, be subject to much higher levels of interruption and task
switching - thus needing very different interface designs.

The workshop aims to be a forum for the presentation of current research and
exchange of experiences into technological and usability aspects of mobile
information access.

Suggested topics include but are not limited to:

(Continue reading)

Larsen Birger | 25 Jun 13:40 2004
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SIGIR 2004 Workshop on Context in Information Retrieval

--- Apologies for cross-postings ---

Workshop on Information Retrieval in Context (IRiX) at SIGIR 20004

Call for Participation

There is a growing realisation that relevant information will be

increasingly accessible across media and genres, across languages and

across modalities. The retrieval of such information will depend on

time, place, history of interaction, task in hand, and a range of other

factors that are not given explicitly but are implicit in the

interaction, the user's history and situation, and the ambient

environment, namely the context. IR research is now conducted in

multi-media, multi-lingual, and multi-modal environments, but largely

out of context. However, such contextual data could be used effectively

to constrain retrieval of information thereby reducing the complexity of

the retrieval process. To achieve this, context models for different

modalities will need to be developed so that they can be deployed

effectively to enhance retrieval performance. Thus truly context-aware

and context-dependent retrieval will become feasible.

This workshop will explore a variety of theoretical frameworks,

characteristics and research approaches to focus on an agenda of

activities to be recommended for future interactive IR (IIR) research.

There is a strong programme of contributed papers and panels for the

Workshop; we now invite those interested in the issue of context as it

affects information retrieval to register to participate in the workshop

as attendees and contributors to the discussion. Registration for such

participation is open until the day of the workshop, which is 29 July

2004 in Sheffield, England.

For further information about the Workshop, including the schedule and

program, please see http://ir.dcs.gla.ac.uk/context/; to register for

the Workshop, please go to http://www.sigir.org/sigir2004/. Please note

that one can register for the Workshop independently of registering for

SIGIR 2004.

Organisers:

Peter Ingwersen, Royal School of LIS, Denmark

Keith van Rijsbergen, University of Glasgow, Scotland

Nick Belkin, Rutgers University, USA



Sandor Dominich | 28 Jun 11:20 2004
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Call - ACM SIGIR MF/IR 2004

apologies for cross-posting

REGISTRATION OPEN!

(NOTICE! It is possible to register to the workshop only, registration to
the SIGIR 2004 Conference as a whole is not required.)

ACM SIGIR 2004 WORKSHOP

ON

MATHEMATICAL/FORMAL METHODS IN INFORMATION RETRIEVAL

MF/IR 2004

OBJECTIVE

The previous four workshops (ACM SIGIR MF/IR 2000, Athens, Greece; ACM
SIGIR MF/IR 2001, New Orleans, USA; ACM SIGIR MF/IR 2002, Tampere, Finland;
ACM SIGIR MF/IR 2003, Toronto, Canada) showed that the mathematical/formal
results achieved in Information Retrieval (IR) could be organized into a
coherent theoretical framework, that they brought new knowledge to IR, and
that mathematical/formal research in IR has established itself as a
specialized research area of IR. The increased attendance and rising
interest indicate that MF/IR is viable.

The purpose of the MF/IR 2004 workshop is, on the one hand, to continue and
enhance the results obtained so far, and on the other hand, to present,
discuss, analyze, integrate the newer/newest results. Therefore MF/IR 2004
aims at promoting discussion and interaction among those with theoretical
and applicative research interests in mathematical/formal aspects of
Information Retrieval coming from a ¾ potentially and relatively ¾ large
spectrum of different IR fields, and also at being a forum for the
presentation of both theoretical and applicative results (e.g.,
foundational issues; description and/or integration of models; retrieval
applications; mathematical/formal techniques, properties and structures in
IR; existing and/or new theories and theoretical aspects).

There will be paper presentations, and it is planned to have an invited
speaker. Although the presentations should follow a conference style,
however, interaction and discussion are also of primary importance. The
presentations will be followed by a Discussion Panel, which has been very
successful in the previous MF/IR workshops.

Due to high interest in this workshop in previous years, paper
presentations will be selected on a peer review basis, just as in previous
workshops. Due to time constraints (one day workshop), the number of
presentations seems to be limited to around 15 papers, whereas the number
of participants between 30 and 40. The members of the PC usually attend the
workshop. It was also very important to see in previous workshops that more
and more young researchers attended, and also more and more new research
groups seemed to establish themselves in the field of MF/IR.

The previous MF/IR workshops have been successful also financially, and got
good rating from participants. The best papers from the four previous MF/IR
events, once enhanced and revised, were selected for publication in special
topic issues by the Journal of the American Society of Information Science
and Technology, Journal of Information Retrieval, and Information
Processing & Management.

TOPICS OF INTEREST

Contributions are solicited dealing with, but not limited to, the following
areas:

Information Retrieval

Information Filtering

Information Mining

Indexing and Retrieval

Hypermedia

World Wide Web Retrieval

Digital Libraries

Evaluation

User Modeling, and User Tasks

Semantic Web and Ontologies

Web Link Topology

where the different entities involved (e.g., documents, queries, relevance,
effectiveness, users, etc.) are modeled using any of, but not necessarily
limited to, the following approaches:

Classical Sets

Fuzzy Sets

Rough Sets

Vectors

Linear Space

Similarity Functions

Probability

Theory of Uncertainty

Functional Analysis

Algebra

Topology

Metric Spaces

Euclidean Geometry

Non-Euclidean Geometries

Boolean Logic

Non-standard Logics

Fuzzy Logic

Quantum Logic

Matroid Theory

Graph Theory

Theory of Computation

Recursion Theory

Information Theory

Artificial Intelligence

Statistical and Physical Methods

WORKSHOP CHAIRS

·        Sandor Dominich (University of Veszprém, Hungary)

·        C.J. “Keith” van Rijsbergen (University of Glasgow, Scotland, U.K.)

PROGRAM COMMITTEE

·        Peter       Bruza (Distr. Sys. Tech. Centre, Queensland, Australia)

·        Steven       Cater (Kettering University, U.S.A.)

·        Fabio       Crestani (University of Strathclyde, Scotland)

·        Sandor       Daranyi (University of Gothenburg, Boras, Sweden)

·        Leo       Egghe (Limburgs Universitair Centrum, Belgium)

·        Norbert       Fuhr (University of Dortmund, Germany)

·        Donald       H. Kraft (Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge,
U.S.A.)

·        Eduard      Hoenkamp (A.C.M., the Netherlands)

·        Theo       Huibers (KPMG Bus. Adv. Serv., the Netherlands)

·        April       Konthostathis (Ursinus College, U.S.A.)

·        Mounia      Lalmas (Queen Mary London, U.K.)

·        David       Losada (University of Corunna, Spain)

·        Jian-Yun       Nie (University of Montreal, Canada)

·        Gabriella       Pasi (ITIM-CNR, Milan, Italy)

·        Vijay       Raghavan (University of Louisiana at Lafayette, U.S.A.)

·        Michael       Wong (University of Regina, Canada

SUBMISSION

Submitted papers should be of at most 15 normal (A4) pages in length.
Please submit the paper in PDF or PS by e-mail to the following e-mail
address

dominich@...

using "MF/IR 2004 Submission" as the e-mail subject line. The format for
the paper should follow a usual format in IR publishing. All submissions
will be reviewed by two referees. All accepted papers will be made
available in a printed and/or electronic proceedings. It is planned that a
selected number of accepted papers, once expanded and revised, be included
in a post-workshop journal issue.

CORRESPONDENCE

Direct correspondence, inquires and submissions relating to this workshop
should be addressed to:

Sandor Dominich, e-mail: dominich@...

IMPORTANT DATES

Submission of papers:                                     31 May 2004

Notification of acceptance:                              15 June 2004

Final submission:                                           30 June 2004

FURTHER INFORMATION

Further information can be found on the SIGIR 2004 Web site at
http://www.sigir2004.org/

Mark Greenwood | 28 Jun 19:25 2004
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SIGIR 2004 IR4QA Workshop - Call for Participation

                        SIGIR'04 Workshop

                     Call for Participation

         INFORMATION RETRIEVAL FOR QUESTION ANSWERING (IR4QA)

                   July 29, 2004, Sheffield, UK

For registration details see http://www.sigir.org/sigir2004

IMPORTANT: You do not have to register for the full SIGIR conference
           to register and attend the IR4QA workshop.

Open domain question answering has become a very active research area
over the past few years, due in large measure to the stimulus of the
TREC Question Answering track. This track addresses the task of
finding *answers* to natural language (NL) questions (e.g. ``How
tall is the Eiffel Tower?" ``Who is Aaron Copland?'') from large text
collections. This task stands in contrast to the more conventional IR
task of retrieving *documents* relevant to a query, where the
query may be simply a collection of keywords (e.g. ``Eiffel Tower",
``American composer, born Brooklyn NY 1900, ...'').

Finding answers requires processing texts at a level of detail that
cannot be carried out at retrieval time for very large text
collections. This limitation has led many researchers to propose,
broadly, a two stage approach to the QA task. In stage one a subset of
query-relevant texts are selected from the whole collection.  In stage
two this subset is subjected to detailed processing for answer
extraction. To date stage one has received limited explicit attention,
despite its obvious importance -- performance at stage two is bounded
by performance at stage one.  The goal of this workshop is to correct
this situation, and, hopefully, to draw attention of IR researchers to
the specific challenges raised by QA.

A straightforward approach to stage one is to employ a conventional IR
engine, using the NL question as the query and with the collection
indexed in the standard manner, to retrieve the initial set of
candidate answer bearing documents for stage two.  However, a number
of possibilities arise to optimise this set-up for QA, including:
Open domain question answering has become a very active research area
over the past few years, due in large measure to the stimulus of the
TREC Question Answering track. This track addresses the task of
finding *answers* to natural language (NL) questions (e.g. ``How
tall is the Eiffel Tower?" ``Who is Aaron Copland?'') from large text
collections. This task stands in contrast to the more conventional IR
task of retrieving *documents* relevant to a query, where the
query may be simply a collection of keywords (e.g. ``Eiffel Tower",
``American composer, born Brooklyn NY 1900, ...'').

Finding answers requires processing texts at a level of detail that
cannot be carried out at retrieval time for very large text
collections. This limitation has led many researchers to propose,
broadly, a two stage approach to the QA task. In stage one a subset of
query-relevant texts are selected from the whole collection.  In stage
two this subset is subjected to detailed processing for answer
extraction. To date stage one has received limited explicit attention,
despite its obvious importance -- performance at stage two is bounded
by performance at stage one.  The goal of this workshop is to correct
this situation, and, hopefully, to draw attention of IR researchers to
the specific challenges raised by QA.

A straightforward approach to stage one is to employ a conventional IR
engine, using the NL question as the query and with the collection
indexed in the standard manner, to retrieve the initial set of
candidate answer bearing documents for stage two.  However, a number
of possibilities arise to optimise this set-up for QA, including:
o preprocessing the question in creating the IR query;
o preprocessing the collection to identify significant information that
  can be included in the indexation for retrieval;
o adapting the similarity metric used in selecting documents;
o modifying the form of retrieval return, e.g. to deliver passages
  rather than whole documents. preprocessing the question in creating
the IR query;
o preprocessing the collection to identify significant information that
  can be included in the indexation for retrieval;
o adapting the similarity metric used in selecting documents;
o modifying the form of retrieval return, e.g. to deliver passages
  rather than whole documents.

The workshop will consist of presentations of the following
accepted papers:
o What Works Better for Question Answering: Stemming or
  Morphological Query Expansion
  Matthew W. Bilotti, Boris Katz and Jimmy Lin
o A Comparative Study on Sentence Retrieval for Definitional
  Question Answering
  Hang Cui, Min-Yen Kan, Tat-Seng Chua and Jing Xiao
o Using Pertainyms to Improve Passage Retrieval for Questions
  Requesting Information About a Location
  Mark A. Greenwood
o Minimal Span Weighting Retrieval for Question Answering
  Christof Monz
o Simple Translation Models for Passage Retrieval for QA
  Vanessa Murdock, W. Bruce Croft
o Sense-Based Blind Relevance Feedback for Question Answering
  Matteo Negri
o Exploring the Performance of Boolean Retrieval Strategies
  For Open Domain Question Answering
  Horacio Saggion, Rob Gaizauskas, Mark Hepple,
  Ian Roberts and Mark A. Greenwood
o Boosting Weak Ranking Functions to Enhance Passage Retrieval
  For Question Answering
  Nicolas Usunier, Massih R. Amini and Patrick Gallinari
o Seeking an Upper Bound to Sentence Level Retrieval in
  Question Answering
  Kieran White and Richard F. E. Sutcliffe
o Domain-Specific QA for the Construction Sector
  Zhuo Zhang, Lyne Da Sylva, Colin Davidson, Gonzalo Lizarralde
  and Jian-Yun Nie

Workshop Organizers
===================

Rob Gaizauskas          (University of Sheffield)
Mark Hepple             (University of Sheffield)
Mark Greenwood          (University of Sheffield)

Programme Committee
===================

Shannon Bradshaw        (University of Iowa)
Charles Clarke          (University of Waterloo)
Sanda Harabagiu         (University of Texas at Dallas)
Eduard Hovy             (University of Southern California)
Jimmy Lin               (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
Christof Monz           (University of Maryland)
John Prager             (IBM)
Dragomir Radev          (University of Michigan)
Maarten de Rijke        (University of Amsterdam)
Horacio Saggion         (University of Sheffield)
Karen Sparck-Jones      (University of Cambridge)
Tomek Strzalkowski      (State University of New York, Albany)
Ellen Voorhees          (NIST)

Anton Leuski | 29 Jun 22:41 2004
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2nd CFP Workshop New Directions For IR Evaluation: Online Conversations

Call for Participation
ACM SIGIR 2004 Workshop on
New Directions For IR Evaluation: Online Conversations

Sheffield, UK, July 29th, 2004
http://www.ict.usc.edu/~leuski/sigir04-oc/

Online conversations encompass a broad range of interactive
experiences, including personal electronic mail, mailing lists,
instant messaging, chat rooms, Usenet newsgroups, threaded Web-based
discussion lists, and massive multi-player on-line role playing games.
These types of interactions raise challenges for information retrieval
research that are under-explored, including very short "documents" that
can be grouped in one or more ways into time-based conversational
"threads," widespread use of sub-languages, characteristics of
informality such as typographical errors, nonstandard abbreviations,
and the use of emoticons. Conversations naturally link participants,
so the design space for retrieval systems can be based on relationships
among those who do the writing, and broader characteristics such as
expertise and trust in addition to what was actually written.

Existing test collections do not yet support these types of inquiry,
and it is not
yet clear how (or even whether) information seeking within online
conversations should be modeled in the design of test collections.
The goal for this workshop will therefore be to articulate the
challenges and to begin to identify the opportunities for productive
IR research in the domain of online conversations.

Goal

Our goal for this workshop is to identify opportunities for important
new research on online conversations and how this research can be
facilitated through the creation of standard community-wide resources
(e.g., development of standard test collections).  To do this, we plan
to bring together researchers from several communities with expertise
in aspects of this question (e.g., information retrieval, online
communities, computer-supported cooperative work, recommender system,
computational linguistics, and text data mining) to explore the
present state of the art and to synthesize multiple perspectives on
evaluation of systems for working with online conversations.  We will
count the workshop as successful if it results in a concrete
understanding of what types of evaluation resources are needed and how
those resources can practically be created.

Participation

This one-day workshop will be structured around paper presentations,
panel discussions, audience interaction, and informal discussions.

Open participation. The workshop is open to all interested
participants. Conference participation or registration is not required
to
attend the workshop. Advance submission of a statement is
describing research interests, and (if appropriate)
proposed discussion points encouraged, but not required.

Important Dates

July 25, 2004  SIGIR conference begins
July 29, 2004  Workshop date

Organizers:

Anton Leuski (co-chair), USC Institute for Creative Technologies
Douglas W. Oard (co-chair), University of Maryland
Abdur Chowdhury, America Online
David Evans, Clairvoyance
Jennifer Preece, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

Contact Information

Questions or comments should be directed to  leuski@... and
oard@...


Gmane