Paul Linnell | 4 Aug 15:39 2010
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manufacturers' product demonstrations on DVD

Hi there

Can anyone tell me which enlightened manufacturers include with their products a DVD with video demonstrations of set-up and operation? I do not mean the print manual as PDF dump on a CD-ROM, which is the usual scenario. There are stacks of third-party video demonstration on videojug, ehow, and the like. Many thanks.

Paul

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Deborah Taylor-Pearce | 13 Aug 02:00 2010

Re: Google Font API


I thought I should let everyone know that my long silence has nothing 
to do with the merits of Google's Web fonts (spec., the historic Fell 
type), but is mostly owing to problems I've had with my upgrade to 
Dreamweaver CS5, which doesn't work properly (drops all typographic 
quote marks from routine copy-and-paste operations).

I had to do extensive troubleshooting to even identify the actual 
problem, which no one appears to know how to fix ... plus, I promised 
myself the beginning of this year that I would not post anything more 
to she-philosopher.com until I re-designed the site for CSS-based 
tableless layouts, which I started to do, only to have my design 
strategy undermined by the new Dreamweaver CS5 all-columns-float 
layouts. So, once again, I'm sitting on lots of new content for my 
website, which I can't yet post until I get some pretty complicated & 
confusing layout issues figured out....

I have now reverted to Dreamweaver CS4, but in the process of dealing 
with all of the above, lost my window of opportunity for Fell type 
experiments. :(

Right now, I'm trying to finish up development on 3 websites scheduled 
to launch this month, so I'm not sure when I'll next have a chance to 
experiment with Google Web type, but I plan to get back to this very 
interesting project as soon as I can.

In the meantime, I do have other questions for the list, which I'll 
post to a separate thread so I don't get in trouble (again!) for 
disorderly conduct. ;-)

Deborah
_____

Deborah Taylor-Pearce
dtp <at> she-philosopher.com

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Deborah Taylor-Pearce | 13 Aug 02:01 2010

sustainable swag

Cafe,

First, does anybody (especially our New Zealand/Australia members) 
know anything about a book titled _Time to Eat the Dog?_, wherein it 
is claimed "by sustainability experts from New Zealand" that dogs have 
a worse eco-footprint than some SUVs?

I quickly searched for the book at amazon, and couldn't come up with 
anything.

My own info on this is from the Winter 2010 issue of Heifer's _World 
Ark_, p. 7, "Your Pet's Ecological Footprint":

http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/heifer/worldark_2010winter/index.php#/8

This provocatively-titled book relates to my own research & efforts to 
develop sustainable swag for a medical communications (cancer 
education) project, and as always, it's proven way more complicated 
than I hoped. Given the known industrial and environmental causes of 
cancers -- in the U.S., now surpassing heart disease as the leading 
cause of death for those under age 85 -- I figure the last thing the 
world needs is a bunch more swag made on the cheap by exploited labor, 
using materials and print processes that contribute to climate change 
and a poisoned planet.

So, among other things, I'm trying to compare the environmental costs 
of organic cotton Tees vs. Tees made from recycled plastic bottles, 
vs. Tees made from wool etc....

And I'm looking into the eco-footprint of various print (like giclée, 
for fine art prints) and other reproduction processes (e.g., 
silkscreen for Tees) for graphic design.

What I've learned so far (admittedly, not much!) is that this is all 
incredibly complicated, and makes a wonderful case study for 
application of Darrell Huff's _How to Lie with Statistics_.

I'm having a hard time finding comparable standards for any of this.

I did notice that the Trigger Issues booklet by activist Troth Wells, 
_T-Shirt: One Small Item, One Giant Impact_, published at Oxford by 
New Internationalist, is

	"Printed on recycled paper by TJ International, UK / who
	holds environmental accreditation ISO 14001."

There is a little "Printed on Recycled Paper" icon next to this 
statement that I assume has something to do with ISO 14001? or perhaps 
this is yet another symbol made up by the printer/publisher for their 
own use? (There are a lot of organizations out there generating their 
own icons for just about everything even remotely related to "green" 
products & services.)

So, does anyone know anything about or have experience working to ISO 
14001 (which I believe is a U.K. standard)? A quickie search reveals 
lots of companies selling their "green your business" services 
relating to ISO 14001, but I didn't find any actual text for ISO 14001 
or any information about its rules & regulations governing print 
processes.

Here in the States, I've found companies touting more than just their 
use of recycled paper, with icons for things like "Printed with 
Certified Wind Power" -- as on the back of the Ibex Outdoor Clothing 
catalog (I've temporarily posted a 550KB facsimile of this to my 
website at

http://www.she-philosopher.com/home/temp/IBEX_2010catalog.jpg

for those who would like to see for themselves). (And no, the little 
strip of cardboard at lower right is not part of the catalog design -- 
which is pretty clever throughout -- but was placed there by me to 
cover over my mailing address.)

But I have no idea what these claims really mean, or how much using, 
e.g., wind power, improves a print shop's eco-footprint over using, 
say, solar power, or whatever "green" power a local power plant may 
provide....

What I'm looking for is reliable, statistical information so that I 
can make my own trade-offs regarding print production for our new line 
of merchandise.

(E.g., at least one reader critiqued Annie Leonard's _The Story of 
Stuff: How Our Obsession with Stuff Is Trashing the Planet, Our 
Communities, and Our Health -- and a Vision for Change_ for the poor 
quality of its recycled paper:

	"My only criticism is that the pages are very dense --would
	have loved more graphics and white space -- and I don't like
	the feel of the paper (100% post consumer recycled of course)
	but I know the author wanted to walk her talk by insisting on
	the highest possible green standards for publishing."

 From the review at

http://www.amazon.com/Story-Stuff-Obsession-Communities-Health-/dp/143912566X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1281565090&sr=1-1

There may be situations where I could get away with such lousy-quality 
recycled paper, and others where I can not, and it would be nice to 
have enough comparative data so that I can make my own informed 
trade-offs.)

At this point, I basically agree with the respondent to the "Easy 
Answers" blog on "What are the best fish to eat--for me and the 
environment?" (see

http://www.publicradio.org/columns/marketplace/sustainability-answers/2010/07/what-seafood-is-sustainable.html

) who wrote

	"Note the title “Easy Answers” There are several
	organizations like MBA who make recommendations, but you’ll
	find their recommendations conflict with one another. You
	need to determine what values are important to you and make
	decisions accordingly. Sorry folks, it’s just not that easy."

So, my remaining questions for the list: are there organizations like 
this already out there making recommendations for the graphic design 
and print trades?

Deborah
_____

Deborah Taylor-Pearce
dtp <at> she-philosopher.com
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Dave Crossland | 13 Aug 09:07 2010

Re: Google Font API

Hi!

Sorry for the delay in responding to this, I've been on the road all
summer without paying too much attention to email :-)

On 25 July 2010 16:58, Deborah Taylor-Pearce <dtp <at> she-philosopher.com> wrote:
> If anyone knows a work-around for this problem (that doesn't involve
> users having to tweak obscure display settings on their systems ... or
> switch to an Apple computer ;-), I would love to hear it, so that I
> can expand my Web design choices beyond Georgia, Verdana, Trebuchet
> and Courier.

Cantarell is not hinted at all with its current version. The next
version will have hinting, which will help; I guess that things will
improve overall as time goes by :-)

Cheers
Dave
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Caroline Jarrett | 13 Aug 13:01 2010
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Re: sustainable swag

>From Deborah 
<snip - other discussion?
> 
> So, does anyone know anything about or have experience working to ISO
> 14001 (which I believe is a U.K. standard)? A quickie search reveals
> lots of companies selling their "green your business" services
> relating to ISO 14001, but I didn't find any actual text for ISO 14001
> or any information about its rules & regulations governing print
> processes.

<snip - other matters>

Plentiful information about the standard:

http://www.iso-14001.org.uk/
is a good place to start.

I found a big range of useful material using my default search, which looks
at UK web only first. So I assume that this means that the standard
originated in the UK. But as it now has an ISO number, that means it's an
international standard. 

(Of course, there is a big difference between being an international
standard, and actually being adopted internationally).

I don't have any tactical information about applying it. It does look rather
similar to ISO 9001, which is an old friend for me. If you stick closely to
the spirit of ISO 9001 and scrupulously try to keep your paperwork (or
electronic equivalent) to a minimum, then it can be really helpful. Most
implementations I have seen definitely submerge the spirit under a ghastly
heap of forms, procedures, plans, and other bureaucracy.

Best
Caroline Jarrett
Twitter  <at> cjforms
www.formsthatwork.com

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Deborah Taylor-Pearce | 13 Aug 21:05 2010

Re: sustainable swag


Thanks, David:

> I remember this story was
> widely reported in the news
> media when the book was
> published last year. The book
> is available on Amazon.co.uk -
> seehttp://amzn.to/axij60

I've not been able to get through yet, but I'll have another go later 
today.

> BTW, I am always amuse when
> I see the statement "printed
> on recycled paper" on the PDF
> electronic version of a book.

Yes.

I suppose it should be amended to read: "Please print this on recycled 
paper." <bg>

... And if we ever manage to figure out some recommendations, we could 
add a link to "recycled paper" sending everyone to a Web page with a 
table & reports listing the pros and cons of various recycled paper 
stocks, colored and not, for use with various printers, etc. ... and 
maybe even an interactive database where folks in the trade can record 
their experiences with the different paper stocks.... <bg>

(Just dreaming, of course, but this sort of thing is very much on my 
wish list!)

David's comment about PDFs also raises interesting issues about "which 
is greener?": e-publication or printed matter?

I'm thinking here of digital photo albums (not Flickr, etc., but the 
wooden frames with glass that you plug into the wall) vs. printing 
your own photos for display with an inkjet vs. the old-fashioned 
action of sending your film/slides out for developing.

I suppose one of these days we'll all be able to display a dynamic 
photo montage on a living room wall made of super-efficient e-paper, 
or something. But we're far from those sorts of efficiencies, now.

Digital photo albums were widely advertised over here with the usual 
claim about all the trees you would be saving should you buy one 
(disclosure: we did in fact buy one of these for my mother-in-law, who 
likes to have family pix on display), but there are also big issues 
about all the electronic devices we're plugging in everywhere, 
including our homes, some of which never turn off, and which are quite 
costly to run.

... Which is one of the problems with electric cars in their present 
form, too. We simply don't have the infrastructure in the States for 
*everyone* to be plugging in their cars at night ... and I'm not sure 
this ever really will be possible on such a grand scale.

Deborah
_____

Deborah Taylor-Pearce
dtp <at> she-philosopher.com
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Deborah Taylor-Pearce | 13 Aug 21:06 2010

Re: sustainable swag

Thanks, Caroline:

> Plentiful information about
> the standard:
>
> http://www.iso-14001.org.uk/
> is a good place to start.

I've not been able to get through here yet, either (will check back 
again later).

Quick question: is ISO 9001 mostly concerned with reducing paperwork 
within the organization? Or does it also tackle a range of energy-use 
and environmental issues?

Also, you wouldn't happen to have a handy URL for it, too? ;-)

Deborah
_____

Deborah Taylor-Pearce
dtp <at> she-philosopher.com

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Deborah Taylor-Pearce | 14 Aug 05:19 2010

Re: Google Font API

Hi, Dave --

> I've been on the road all
> summer without paying too
> much attention to email :-)

Sweet! <vbg>

> Cantarell is not hinted at
> all with its current version.
> The next version will have
> hinting, which will help

Great.

Looking forward to its release,
Deborah
_____

Deborah Taylor-Pearce
dtp <at> she-philosopher.com
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Caroline Jarrett | 14 Aug 12:45 2010
Picon

Re: sustainable swag

>From Deborah
> 
> Quick question: is ISO 9001 mostly concerned with reducing paperwork
> within the organization? Or does it also tackle a range of energy-use
> and environmental issues?

ISO 9001 is the quality management standard. It stands in relation to
quality as ISO 14001 stands to environment: they are both about creating and
maintaining a policy within an organisation. Neither actually specifies what
you should do; neither lays down a specific standard that you should attain.

ISO 9001 and its various sibling standards are listed for sale here:
http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnum
ber=21823
If you scroll past the list of parts for sale, you will see a short overview
of the standards.

They cost a fortune, but my university's library has a subscription to the
standards library. I expect that other academic libraries will also have
subscriptions. 

As you will have found with ISO 14001, there are many commercial,
semi-commercial, and other organisations that are aiming to sell you various
types of services to help with certification. If you google ISO 9001 or ISO
14001, you'll mostly get their sites; most of them have some sort of
overview of the standards. 

What they don't tell you is that there is no requirement to purchase any
help with passing the certification. It's years since I looked at it in
great detail but so far as I can recall, there's no requirement to be
certified either, but it does make it simpler to respond to a tender that
requires compliance. In the computer industry, such requirements are
commonplace for ISO 9001; I assume that ISO 14001 is intended to get the
same sort of traction. I don't know if it has or not because I try to avoid
responding to tenders as much as possible.

Best
Caroline Jarrett
Twitter  <at> cjforms
www.formsthatwork.com

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Deborah Taylor-Pearce | 14 Aug 23:41 2010

Re: sustainable swag

Caroline,

Many thanks for this.

> ISO 9001 and its various
> sibling standards are listed
> for sale here:
> http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_detail.htm?csnum
> ber=21823
> If you scroll past the list
> of parts for sale, you will
> see a short overview of the
> standards.
>
> They cost a fortune

This is one of my pet peeves: government regulations that we're all 
supposed to conform to (in some cases, *have* to conform to) that are 
neither easily accessible nor FREE of charge for all those to whom 
they apply.

I'm thinking here of local building codes in the States (which we do 
*have* to comply with in order to pass the various stages of 
government inspection on all construction and home remodeling 
projects). In this case especially, you need a copy of the code 
on-site, and not buried away in the non-lending "Reference" section of 
your local university library.

In the old, pre-Internet days local governments in the U.S. had at 
least some sort of an excuse because of the cost of printing up the 
standards (and not on recycled paper, either! ;-), but mostly the 
paperwork was costly and copies hard to locate because it was in the 
interests of those profiting from "helping" you comply that this was so.

These days (of supposedly "accountable" and "transparent" government), 
there is absolutely NO excuse for this!

> I try to avoid responding
> to tenders as much as
> possible.

Amen to that! ;-)

This particular project is my own brainstorm, so I don't have to 
conform to any standard I don't want to, and I obviously won't be 
using costly policy guidelines as a model, either.

I'm more concerned with making real, but gradual, changes where I can, 
and am willing to experiment so as to learn what "green" solutions 
work and what don't for the sorts of things I want to do. Above all, I 
don't want one-size-fits-all regulations, but options & choices so I 
can make my own situational trade-offs.

E.g., if someone can recommend a recycled paper stock that we can use 
for fine art prints & posters, great.

If not, we'll do the best we can with what's available, so as not to 
compromise the integrity of the reproduction ... explain to everyone 
why we made the choices we made ... and keep on looking for "greener" 
approaches & solutions. (E.g., I'm certain that there are plenty of 
trade-offs to be made during the design stages of a poster that would 
make a big difference in the environmental costs of production, and if 
anyone knows what these might be, please do share with us.)

Granted, this kind of piece-meal approach to what is a huge and 
pressing problem is not ideal, but it's the best I can do.

(As they say, "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.")

And ditto for dogs.

As a life-long human partner of dogs, I'm not switching to "pet" 
hamsters or goldfish, either.

And certainly not turning to my neighbors for the sort of 
companionship I enjoy with my dogs. Yikes! what a thought!

(Yes, I finally managed to access the amazon UK link for _Time to Eat 
the Dog?_....)

OK, end of rant.

Thanks again to Caroline.

You saved me a lot of wasted time researching this, which I very much 
appreciate! <bg>

Deborah
_____

Deborah Taylor-Pearce
dtp <at> she-philosopher.com

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Gmane