Milan Bouchet-Valat | 1 Feb 09:36 2012
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Re: Settings Windows.

Le mardi 31 janvier 2012 à 19:14 +0100, Paweł Kubik a écrit :
> I know that certain programmes might look very ugly with some sizes,
> however developers can assign many rules to window components to make
> sure they will look properly. Of course creating fixed size windows is
> easier, but I don't think it should be kept like this. KDE doesn't
> have any problems although their settings look very similar.
The idea is that there's absolutely no point in resizing these settings
window if we manage to set the correct size automatically. So instead of
allowing you to work around bugs, we try to fix them at the root.

After all, if you had been able to resize this window, you wouldn't have
sent this mail, and maybe we wouldn't have noticed. Please file a bug,
people working on the control center will tell you what they want to do.

Cheers
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Paweł Kubik | 2 Feb 17:10 2012
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Re: Settings Windows.


So common, before spending time to refine some window size, let's close
those obviously more important bugs. Having to resize a window once in a
while is far less important than a non coherent behavior of mouse click,
don't you think ?

We were not talking about changing the size of window to default after each open but about being unable to resize it at all.

Anyway. At this point it's even hard to say if it's a bug or simply temporary solution of developers. Control-Center is at very early stage, so we should just wait some time until judgement. This topic is neither important or interesting so I suggest to close it.

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Lone Learner | 5 Feb 09:59 2012
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GNOME 3 - How to get the same level of productivity as that of GNOME classic?

Hello everyone,


I have recently upgraded to GNOME 3 and it is taking me time getting used to it. I am going through the Desktop Help and hopefully I'll be up to speed with it in a few days. However, there are a couple of things I need to know right away if I have to be productive. I hope you can help me out these.

1. There are thre panels when I press the "Activities" button on the top panel: top panel, left panel, right panel. How can I keep shortcut of applications on the top panel?

2. How can I keep a shortcut of '/usr/bin/urxvt' on the left panel?

3. How do i create a shortcut for '/usr/bin/urxvt' on the left panel?

4. To switch from any window to any other window, I need two clicks now: (1) Activities (2) The window I want to switch to. Can this be done in a single click like we could in GNOME classic?

Lone Learner
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Re: GNOME 3 - How to get the same level of productivity as that of GNOME classic?


On Dom, 5 de Febrero de 2012, 9:59 am, Lone Learner dijo:
> Hello everyone,
>
> I have recently upgraded to GNOME 3 and it is taking me time getting used
> to it. I am going through the Desktop Help and hopefully I'll be up to
> speed with it in a few days. However, there are a couple of things I need
> to know right away if I have to be productive. I hope you can help me out
> these.
>
> 1. There are thre panels when I press the "Activities" button on the top
> panel: top panel, left panel, right panel. How can I keep shortcut of
> applications on the top panel?
>
> 2. How can I keep a shortcut of '/usr/bin/urxvt' on the left panel?
>
> 3. How do i create a shortcut for '/usr/bin/urxvt' on the left panel?

You can use alacarte to add this program to the applications view, the
same way we used to do in GNOME 2. And you can add to the dash by
dragging the icon from the application view.

> 4. To switch from any window to any other window, I need two clicks now:
> (1) Activities (2) The window I want to switch to. Can this be done in a
> single click like we could in GNOME classic?

Well, you don't need to click Activities. You move quickly the pointer to the
hot corner and back. This can movement is learnt by some interaction with
gnome shell and be done without any effort.

You can learn more about how to use the new shell here:
https://live.gnome.org/GnomeShell/CheatSheet

Cheers,

   -- Juanjo Marin
Miguel Garcia | 7 Feb 06:47 2012
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Invitation to submit chapters for “Cases on Usability Engineering: Design and Development of Digital Products”

Apologies for cross-posting.
CALL FOR CASES
Cases on Usability Engineering: Design and Development of Digital Products
A book edited by Dr. Miguel A. Garcia-Ruiz, Algoma University, Canada
To be published by IGI Global: http://www.igi-global.com/
For more information, go to:
http://people.auc.ca/garcia/cfc_cases_on_usability_engineering.html
Proposal Submission Deadline: February 28, 2012

Introduction

Through the discussion and examination of specific cases on the
usability testing of digital products, students are given insight into
professional issues through the trials, “war stories”, practical
experiences, and research findings of practitioners, specialists,
lecturers, and usability researchers. One advantage of using case
studies as a mode of instruction is that it allows computing students
to acquire necessary competences through exposure to contexts and
settings that they might not otherwise experience in educational
settings.

Overall Objective of the Book

This book will include case studies on the rationale, state-of-the-art
studies, proof-of-concepts, and real-life examples of usability
methods and techniques which test the design and development of
digital products. These cases are optimal for usability,
human-computer interaction, human factors, ergonomics, software
engineering, and related courses.

Submission Procedure

Lecturers, researchers and practitioners are invited to submit on or
before February 28, 2012, a 2-3 page case proposal clearly explaining
the mission and concerns of his or her proposed case.
For more information, go to:
http://people.auc.ca/garcia/cfc_cases_on_usability_engineering.html

Inquiries and Submissions can be forwarded electronically (Word
document) or by mail to:
Dr. Miguel A. Garcia-Ruiz
Algoma University
Department of Computer Science and Mathematics
1520 Queen Street East
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada, P6A 2G4
Phone: 705-949-2301, ext. 4312
e-mail: miguel.garcia <at> algomau.ca
Alternative email: miguelga2002 <at> gmail.com
Paweł Kubik | 7 Feb 23:46 2012
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Desktop management. - Discussions topics proposal.

//I am afraid that my foreword might be found boring and is actually even longer then main idea. I have marked it as some kind of attachment. Skip to the 4th paragraph if you find the previous part too boring to continue.

When I do some basic work I usually use about two windows. I think it's quite common. Programmer has to have some documentation along with IDE, or terminal along with text editor. Writer often need a dictionary when he write something in a text processor.
I used to have few windows maximised and kept on different desktops. I could have a glance at the docs while writing a program via hotkeys (SuperKey+<numbers> were perfect). I must admit that it was the most efficient I ever used.

Let's answer a simple question. Why do we need virtual desktops? Why haven't they been implemented in Windows, for example?
When I have started my linux adventure I have treated virtual desktops as some kind of sessions. I was using only one desktop until I decided to take a break and do something completely different. It took some time until I have worked my way to use them efficiently. Finding a way to manage workspaces is difficult, although experienced user may not expect that.

The linux gives us total freedom in organising our environment. We could develop new features in Gnome to fulfil all potential needs but where would we get then? To KDE or Compiz. Heavy, large and difficult to set up. The heaven for newcomers who want to have some fun (if not large number of bugs). But we already have it (as entire FOSS community).

//(SKIP HERE) :)
I think that we should create The Gnome Usage Solutions. We should collect some patterns of situations and find the most comfortable and effectively way to act.
For example the mentioned problem of using only two windows with a need of having a glance on the second one while being focused on the first. Classical mouse clicking fails without discussion. We could use two desktops and switch via hotkeys but then desktop switching image covers some screen for a while. Another way is to resize both windows to halves of their sizes and keep them both visible. I'm sure you see what I mean.

Why should we do such discussions? Some of you might say that solving such problems is an individual matter. I wouldn't like to force anyone to do something specific way. I'd like to simply create some public database. When someone will propose any feature, others may not imagine their use. Even if he would came with an example it's hard to analyse it properly on fly. It might also be the source of ideas itself. For example one of solutions I gave in the previous example has disadvantage of image which covers some screen when you switch the desktops via hotkeys (press LCTRL+LALT+DOWN_ARROW to see it). It automatically brings us simple idea to change it.

Don't think "I think that I wasn't working efficiently last time. What could be introduced to change it?", but instead ask us what could you do to make it easier. First think about the problem, then try to solve it using methods you have. Think about changes at the end.

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Calum Benson | 9 Feb 16:43 2012
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Re: Desktop management. - Discussions topics proposal.


On 7 Feb 2012, at 22:46, Paweł Kubik wrote:

> Why should we do such discussions? Some of you might say that solving such problems is an individual
matter. I wouldn't like to force anyone to do something specific way. I'd like to simply create some public
database. 

Sounds quite similar to the GNOME 3 Pattern Library we've been working on as part of the new HIG[1]… at the
moment, it's scattered around live.gnome.org and git, so it's not really ready for public consumption
yet. But hop on over to #gnome-design on irc.gimp.net if you'd like to help out.

Regards,
Calum.

[1] http://live.gnome.org/Design/HIG/

--

-- 
CALUM BENSON, Interaction Designer     Oracle Corporation Ireland
mailto:calum.benson <at> oracle.com         Solaris Desktop & Applications
http://blogs.oracle.com/calum          +353 1 803 3807

Any opinions are personal and not necessarily those of Oracle Corp.

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Kirk Bridger | 9 Feb 17:52 2012
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Re: Desktop management. - Discussions topics proposal.

I think the description sounds like a series of scenarios or use cases 
that are the focus of the design.  The pattern library might be too 
abstract or might not address "workflow" on the desktop.

The problem I've found with trying to create these kinds of things is 
that they tend to live in isolation, they age quickly, and they usually 
aren't used since devs are trying to improve or change the workflow via 
product improvements.

In the past some projects have tried capturing scenarios of use in their 
persona or user definitions [1].

Some years ago I was involved in trying to define a set of "Gnome Users" 
or personas that could help guide development [2].  That ended up being 
too large of an undertaking at the time and I ended up leaving it 
alone.  The critical discovery I made then was that there was no point 
in doing all that work if nobody was going to use them or adhere to them.

I agree that the vision is an interesting one, but for a FLOSS project 
the size of Gnome I'm not sure how feasible it is.  That being said, the 
pattern library is a not so small attempt at increasing coherence across 
the desktop, which may be another way to achieve your desired goals.

Kirk

[1] http://live.gnome.org/Banter/Design/Personas
[2] http://live.gnome.org/UsabilityProject/Whiteboard/Personas

On 02/09/2012 07:43 AM, Calum Benson wrote:
> On 7 Feb 2012, at 22:46, Paweł Kubik wrote:
>
>> Why should we do such discussions? Some of you might say that solving such problems is an individual
matter. I wouldn't like to force anyone to do something specific way. I'd like to simply create some public database.
> Sounds quite similar to the GNOME 3 Pattern Library we've been working on as part of the new HIG[1]… at the
moment, it's scattered around live.gnome.org and git, so it's not really ready for public consumption
yet. But hop on over to #gnome-design on irc.gimp.net if you'd like to help out.
>
> Regards,
> Calum.
>
> [1] http://live.gnome.org/Design/HIG/
>
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Paweł Kubik | 12 Feb 09:08 2012
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Re: Desktop management. - Discussions topics proposal.

Well. I was thinking specifically about Gnome Shell. Someone has recently complained that switching windows hot corner is very uncomfortable. Can anyone fully agree? I can't. When I have many windows opened and I'm constantly opening and closing them, it's great, however sometimes people need some integrated environment.
When I am using only few windows I can remember which one has been opened first. Then the best solution is surprisingly the one from Windows 7, where SuperKey+numbers switches to corresponding window on the bar. It's so obvious and easy that we may think that we have nothing to do with it. Of course it's false!
We can still make improvements. I simply want to introduce some ideas to increase out productivity (well, maybe not best word for people who just talk). In the high school I was forced to read poetry. At first I could it twenty times I don't see anything, but analysing line by line let me deepen my interpretations. It didn't change my negative attitude at all, but showed me how how much can be overlooked in overall view. (sorry if I am obvious once again). The intuition may omit some things. By analysing single case we can find solution for wide range of them, just as by analysing single verse of poem we can find an idea for whole interpretation.

(I wouldn't like to be considered a great art lover who I'm not. I know that my comparison may be less helpful as it pretended to be.)

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Buyongo Phiri | 12 Feb 16:34 2012
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Re: usability Digest, Vol 93, Issue 7

Hi

My name is Buyongo Phiri, I am from Southafrica and would like to contribute to Gnome Project especially my thoughts on the shell. I have found that using it full-time is great but the shell makes it hard to manage windows and applications because of the grouping of the functionality on the hot corner. I think separating the workspace and windows from hot corner would be better and making workspace switcher hide when not needed. The app dock on the left would also work better if it could show up without going to hot corner making it the destination for all my often used apps. The hot corner would be perfect for launching apps I rarely use and other things like search. Also if apps could be categorized on the dash sorting would be easier. I think behavior like so would suit users better.

Hot corner - Dash with app categories -  List of apps in category

Right now its very hard to find and app when you install one with the way apps are listed similar to mobiles, people should only click on hot corner for something specific /special. I can do diagrams to show what I mean if people don't understand me.

On 12 Feb 2012 2:00 PM, <usability-request <at> gnome.org> wrote:
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Today's Topics:

  1. Re: Desktop management. - Discussions topics proposal.
     (Pawe? Kubik)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Sun, 12 Feb 2012 09:08:19 +0100
From: Pawe? Kubik <engr.maxyan <at> gmail.com>
To: Kirk Bridger <kbridger <at> shaw.ca>
Cc: usability <at> gnome.org
Subject: Re: [Usability] Desktop management. - Discussions topics
       proposal.
Message-ID:
       <CAJtGEB1gDU8v2VuukCPi51hdCT=yS3=w32S1tdTMYpv=-Q_WyQ <at> mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Well. I was thinking specifically about Gnome Shell. Someone has recently
complained that switching windows hot corner is very uncomfortable. Can
anyone fully agree? I can't. When I have many windows opened and I'm
constantly opening and closing them, it's great, however sometimes people
need some integrated environment.
When I am using only few windows I can remember which one has been opened
first. Then the best solution is surprisingly the one from Windows 7, where
SuperKey+numbers switches to corresponding window on the bar. It's so
obvious and easy that we may think that we have nothing to do with it. Of
course it's false!
We can still make improvements. I simply want to introduce some ideas to
increase out productivity (well, maybe not best word for people who just
talk). In the high school I was forced to read poetry. At first I could it
twenty times I don't see anything, but analysing line by line let me deepen
my interpretations. It didn't change my negative attitude at all, but
showed me how how much can be overlooked in overall view. (sorry if I am
obvious once again). The intuition may omit some things. By analysing
single case we can find solution for wide range of them, just as by
analysing single verse of poem we can find an idea for whole interpretation.

(I wouldn't like to be considered a great art lover who I'm not. I know
that my comparison may be less helpful as it pretended to be.)
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