Aleksey Tsalolikhin | 2 May 02:23 2012
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I remapped my Tab and Escape keys (for vi) and now task switching in GNOME 2 is broken...

Hi.  I remapped my Tab and Escape keys using xmodmap, for editing with vi,

    xmodmap -e 'keycode 23 = Escape'
    xmodmap -e 'keycode 9 = Tab'

but now task switching in GNOME 2 (on CentOS 5.7) is broken.

When I strike the Alt-Tab physical keys now, I get my previous window.

If I press the Alt-Tab keys, and release the Tab key while still holding down
Alt, I get the Tash Switcher window, with the 2nd icon highlighted, but if I
then press the Tab key again, the Task Switcher window goes away.

When I strike the physical keys Alt-Escape it just switches me back to
the previous window, and it does not matter if I hold down Alt or not,
same deal.

What's the proper way to remap Tab and Escape within GNOME 2, please?

Best,
Aleksey
Neil Bird | 2 May 13:17 2012
Face

Re: Enable sticky notes

Around about 29/04/12 22:17, W. van den Akker typed ...
> How can I enable sticky-notes in gnome3?

   I'd like that too :-/  I use both that style of notes *and* the 
application-based one (I use tuxcards) for differing sorts of note.

> I use Debian and have the gnome-applet package installed.
> I also see the sticky-notes applet in the /usr/lib/gnome-applet dir.
> But how to start it?

   The sticky-notes-applet you've probably seen is the old GNOME-2 
panel-based applet which won't work under GNOME-3 (not even, I think, for 
the fallback mode, but I could be wrong there).

   I did manage to add a couple of patches for it a while ago, but it's been 
sadly (and stupidly IMHO) neglected for a while now.

   The only alternative I envisage would be a gnome-shell extension that 
mimics the functionality, but I don't think anyone's written one yet.  I 
might look into it myself if I find time.

--

-- 
[neil <at> fnx ~]# rm -f .signature
[neil <at> fnx ~]# ls -l .signature
ls: .signature: No such file or directory
[neil <at> fnx ~]# exit
Adam Tauno Williams | 2 May 15:36 2012

File Chooser Dialog & Network Locations

In Nautilus under the Network section of the side panel there is a list
of the network repositories I am connected to [CIFS, WebDAV, SFTP,
etc..]  This is awesome.

But in applications I see these available in the file-chooser
*sometimes*.  For Firefox in example if I go to upload a file I do not
see them.  I hit Ctrl-L, enter ".gvfs", and I can navigate to the remote
file I want to upload.  It works.... but is there way to see these
Network Places enumerated in the file-chooser dialog irregardless of
application?

--

-- 
Adam Tauno Williams <awilliam <at> whitemice.org>
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Kai-Martin Knaak | 4 May 22:26 2012
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Re: Netspeed applet replacement and other stuff?

Adam Tauno Williams wrote:

> Svante Signell <svante.signell <at> telia.com> wrote:
>>Looks like the fallback alternative is gone, 

The netspeed applet is still in the debian testing repo. And it works 
with the gnome3 components that are currently in testing.

>>so I have to use the default mess

I wouldn't call the default "messy" but "radically reduced". Unfortunately,
the reduction includes many features that improve productivity of experienced
users. Even more unfortunately, this includes most handles to easily configure
the desktop to the needs of the individual user. The default gnome3 theme 
implicitely sends the message "my way, or the highway"

Fortunately, there are ways to regain most of the gnome2 look and feel. I do 
not talk about the dumbed down "classic" session that gdm3 offers by default. 
Enter the suspiciously windows like "gnome-tweaks" application, loads of third 
party "extensions", not documented use of built-in tools on the command line, 
some XML guess work and a few hours of spare time. In my case, the result is
a gnome3 desktop with three of the good old gnome-panels, my preferred applets, 
and a main menu. Most importantly, the panels contain a constantly visible 
windows list and a graphical desktop switcher. The obnoxious notifications.
The top panel does not tell me my name anymore, there is a power-off button
and there are clickable icons on the desktop. 

> oh, you must mean the current awesomeness.  GNOME3 has been a real
> pleasure to use and definativelly improves my productivity.

(Continue reading)

Mark Lytle | 5 May 05:53 2012
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How do I bring up the dialog boxes for time series functions in Gnumeric?

I would like to use the FFT and Periodogram functions, and I know these are run through Dialog boxes, but the documentation, unless I missed it, doesn't say how to invoke these...

Thank You,
 Mark Lytle,
Houston, Texas

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Mark Lytle | 5 May 06:42 2012
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Deeper problem, Gnumeric comes up without menu bars

Standard install on Ubuntu 11.10, Gnumeric 1.10.17  comes up without menu bars, just a minimalist thing across the top with icons for common operations. How do i get the menu bar that has drop down menus to appear?  This is why I'm sure I can't find the advanced functions like Fourier transforms and such...

Thanks,
Mark Lytle
Houston, Texas

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Shaun McCance | 6 May 01:13 2012
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Re: Deeper problem, Gnumeric comes up without menu bars

On Fri, 2012-05-04 at 21:42 -0700, Mark Lytle wrote:
> Standard install on Ubuntu 11.10, Gnumeric 1.10.17  comes up without
> menu bars, just a minimalist thing across the top with icons for
> common operations. How do i get the menu bar that has drop down menus
> to appear?  This is why I'm sure I can't find the advanced functions
> like Fourier transforms and such...

Hi Mark,

This probably has something to do with the global menu bar on Ubuntu.
But Ubuntu uses Unity, not GNOME, so you should ask on a mailing list
or forum specific to Ubuntu.

As for questions about Gnumeric, try gnumeric-list:

http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gnumeric-list

--
Shaun
Philip Durbin | 6 May 04:43 2012
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Can I prevent "Disable touchpad while typing" from affecting mouse movements?

Hello!

After using GNOME 2 for 5 years on a workstation I recently switched to 
a laptop *and* to GNOME 3.

I realized I kept expressing frustration with GNOME 3 but really the 
root of my frustration had more to do with the touchpad on my laptop.

I figured out a workaround to my problem last night and posted a 
question and answer combination to a forum.  It's gotten a pretty 
positive response so far, based on upvotes, so I thought I'd copy and 
paste it here.  If I should be sending feedback like this to some other 
mailing list, please let me know!  Thanks for everyone's hard work on GNOME!

Phil

----

Originally posted to 
http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/37962/can-i-prevent-disable-touchpad-while-typing-from-affecting-mouse-movements

Question: Can I prevent "Disable touchpad while typing" from affecting 
mouse movements?

When I click my name in the upper right, then click "System Settings", 
then "Mouse and Touchpad", and then "Disable touchpad while typing" it 
affects affects my mouse movements.  I have to wait two seconds before I 
can move the pointer with the touchpad.

I like the "Disable touchpad while typing" feature in general, as it 
prevents me from accidentally raising another window instead of the one 
I'm typing into, but can I have the feature only affect taps of the 
touchpad and not my attempts to move the mouse around?

I'm using GNOME 3.2.1 on Fedora 16

----

My Answer:

On my ThinkPad X220T running GNOME 3 it's pretty easy to be typing along 
and accidentally bump the touchpad, causing some window other than the 
one you're typing into to be raised.

Ostensibly, the solution to this problem is to click your name in the 
upper right, then click "System Settings", then "Mouse and Touchpad", 
and then "Disable touchpad while typing" under as shown the screenshot 
at http://www.thinkwiki.org/wiki/Synaptics_TouchPad_driver_for_X .

This will cause `syndaemon` ( 
http://linuxcommand.org/man_pages/syndaemon1.html ) to start up with the 
following options:

     syndaemon -i 2.0 -K -R

Here's what the options mean:

     -i <idle-time>
            How many seconds  to  wait  after  the  last  key  press 
before enabling the touchpad. (default is 2.0s).

     -k     Ignore modifier keys when monitoring keyboard activity.

     -K     Like -k but also ignore Modifier+Key combos.

     -R     Use the XRecord extension for detecting keyboard activity 
instead of polling the keyboard state.

Having syndaemon running with those options eliminates the original 
problem, but it absolutely kills my productivity because the `-t` option 
is **not** enabled:

     -t     Only disable tapping and  scrolling, not mouse movements, 
in response to keyboard activity.

Without `-t`, as soon as I stop typing and try to move the pointer, I 
can't.  I have to wait 2 full seconds before the pointer will move.

Now, back at that "Mouse and Touchpad" interface, I do not see any way 
to configure which options are given to `syndaemon` and from what I can 
tell, the options are hard coded:

http://git.gnome.org/browse/gnome-settings-daemon/tree/plugins/mouse/gsd-mouse-manager.c?id=5ee48ce8aa66f6c4fdc4aa2c07bc03bdb83bcb65#n540

The solution is twofold.  I can't abide `syndaemon` with its default 
options, so I leave "Disable touchpad while typing" unchecked.  Then, to 
get `syndaemon` to start with the options I want, I run 
`gnome-session-properties` to open the "Startup Applications 
Preferences" dialog.  From there, I click Add, fill in a name (I called 
mine "0pdurbin-disable-touchpad-while-typing" so it would appear at the 
top), and a command, which for me is the following:

     syndaemon -i 1.0 -K -R -t

Again, the major change is the addition of `-t` so `syndaemon` doesn't 
paralyze my pointer, but while I was in there I reduced the idle time to 
one second.

I hope this helps someone because this was driving me crazy.

To avoid using a GUI tool like `gnome-session-properties` it looks like 
you could set up a file like this, which was created in my case:

     [pdurbin <at> tabby ~]$ cat ~/.config/autostart/syndaemon.desktop

     [Desktop Entry]
     Type=Application
     Exec=syndaemon -i 1.0 -K -R -t
     Hidden=false
     X-GNOME-Autostart-enabled=true
     Name[en_US]=0pdurbin-disable-touchpad-while-typing
     Name=0pdurbin-disable-touchpad-while-typing
     Comment[en_US]=
     Comment=
     [pdurbin <at> tabby ~]$

Incidentally, this seems to be a pretty complete list of applications 
that are autostarted, the ones listed in `gnome-session-properties`: 
`find /etc/xdg/autostart /usr/share/autostart /usr/share/gdm/autostart/ 
/usr/share/gnome/autostart`
Adam Tauno Williams | 6 May 17:29 2012

Re: Netspeed applet replacement and other stuff?

On Fri, 2012-05-04 at 22:26 +0200, Kai-Martin Knaak wrote: 
> Adam Tauno Williams wrote:
> > Svante Signell <svante.signell <at> telia.com> wrote:
> > oh, you must mean the current awesomeness.  GNOME3 has been a real
> > pleasure to use and definativelly improves my productivity.
> Well, some of the new features are really nice. But again, the default
> theme of gnome3 tries to force feed its ideals to the user. This is 
> clearly bad form.

It is the wise route of clearly presenting the new and improved
approach.

> >> Is there a
> >>replacement for the netspeed applet available?
> > The is an extension that add GNOME System Monitor graphs to the
> > notification bar.
> The netspeed applet does not show graphs but less intrusive but still
> more infomative numbers. By the way, the scale of the system monitor 
> graph receives a rescale about once a minute. That way, you can't really
> judge the quality of the connection at a glance.

This is a serious question:
What is the actual point and useful information provided by the netspeed
applett?  I really do not understand.  

I roam between many excellent and numerous crappy networks.  What useful
thing would netspeed tell me that would improve my productivity?  If the
network connection stinks, it stinks, if it is great, it is great.  And
the only time I care is when I'm transferring a large amount of data in
which case the Firefox Downloads tool tells me the actual transfer rate
or Evolution tells me it is still scanning the mailbox.  There is
nothing I can do about the network speed at that moment. And [speaking
as a professional network administrator for 20+ years] the applet DOES
NOT AND CAN NOT tell me the actual speed of "the connection"; it is just
telling you about your throughput on that interface (which is *NOT* a
real measure of network performance);  performance issues could be
application related or you could have bottlenecks, congestion, or
intentional throttling up-stream.

> Which sometimes is less informational than the window title. Imagine several
> instances of a text editor. They look almost the same in thumb view. Some 
> gnome3 themes add the window title to the thumb nail. 

Ah, good to know.  On my openSUSE install I've always had the thumbnail
and the application window's title displayed below it.  I can see how
absence of the title could be confusing.
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Kai-Martin Knaak | 7 May 04:32 2012
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Re: Netspeed applet replacement and other stuff?

Adam Tauno Williams wrote:

> On Fri, 2012-05-04 at 22:26 +0200, Kai-Martin Knaak wrote:
>> But again, the
>> default theme of gnome3 tries to force feed its ideals to the user.
>> This is clearly bad form.
> 
> It is the wise route of clearly presenting the new and improved
> approach.
> 
Force feeding the new approach without technical necessity to experienced
users is a great way to drastically decrease user satisfaction. Of about
10 independent linux-only users in my acquaintance, only one is happy with 
gnome3 (after significant modification of the default theme). The rest is
either deliberately not upgrading, or converted their desktop to XFCE, 
LXDE or even KDE. 

> This is a serious question:
> What is the actual point and useful information provided by the
> netspeed applett?

Although I don't use the applet, I can still imagine some legitimate 
use cases: 
* Your provider boasted some a particularly fast download. You have a
feeling that he does not quite deliver.
* There are several wlan nodes accessible. You'd like to choose based
 on actual performance.
* An application does not provide the luxery of an explicit download 
 speed display. 

--

-- 
Kai-Martin Knaak
Email: kmk <at> familieknaak.de
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