Jeff Waugh | 1 May 08:03 2003

TARBALLS DUE: GNOME 2.3.1 Development Desktop Release

Goooooood morning GNOME hackers,

It is time again to make distcheck and install-module, and get all the new
GNOME goodies out to testers everywhere! Tarballs are due on Monday, May 5th
for release on the 7th.

If your module is on the 2.2 list, then you need to make a release!

  http://developer.gnome.org/dotplan/modules/

If your module is in the 2.3.x proposed modules list, then you too need to
make a release! Here's the summary:

  battfink - Energy saving and battery status utility.

  drwright - Enforces keyboard/computer breaks to avoid RSI/radiation
    sickness.

  epiphany - A GNOME web browser based on Gecko.

  galeon - A GNOME web browser based on Gecko.

  fontilus - Font management and information tools (will most likely be
    added to the control-center module).

  gcalctool - A full-featured calculator.

  gnome-mag - Desktop magnification tool.

  gnome-meeting - Standards-based audio and video conferencing.
(Continue reading)

Murray.Cumming | 1 May 08:44 2003

RE: 2.4 Proposed Modules - 2 weeks left

> From: Andrew Sobala [mailto:aes <at> gnome.org] 
> > So, "having an accessible browser" should not be one of the 
> reasons for
> > having a GNOME-specific browser, given that this problem is 
> being solved
> > elsewhere?
> 
> Hey,
> 
> If KDE improved their a11y support wouldn't mean that we would drop
> ours. If GNOME is committed to being accessible, then every component
> should be accessible. Just because mozilla is accessible 
> doesn't give a
> GNOME browser an excuse not to be.

I didn't suggest that it would be. I just wanted confirmation that a11y was
not a reason to have a GNOME-specific browser.

Murray Cumming
murrayc <at> usa.net
www.murrayc.com 
Murray.Cumming | 1 May 09:10 2003

RE: Proposal: Workrave

> From: Raymond Penners [mailto:raymond <at> dotsphinx.com] 
> Ofcourse, but that would not really scare us. For now, I 
> think it is not 
> really feasible as Workrave is written in C++ and is gtkmm 
> based. From 
> what I understand, gtkmm is not part of the main GNOME 
> distribution, yet?

I don't think this is a problm. It seems similar to gstreamer, which is not
part of the Platform, but is used by applications in the Desktop.

Murray Cumming
murrayc <at> usa.net
www.murrayc.com 
Jeff Waugh | 1 May 09:16 2003

Re: Proposal: Workrave

<quote who="Murray.Cumming <at> Comneon.com">

> > From: Raymond Penners [mailto:raymond <at> dotsphinx.com] Ofcourse, but that
> > would not really scare us. For now, I think it is not really feasible as
> > Workrave is written in C++ and is gtkmm based. From what I understand,
> > gtkmm is not part of the main GNOME distribution, yet?
> 
> I don't think this is a problm. It seems similar to gstreamer, which is
> not part of the Platform, but is used by applications in the Desktop.

But then gtkmm would need to be added to the desktop release (which was the
issue Raymond raised, without saying "platform" or "desktop").

- Jeff

--

-- 
linux.conf.au 2004: Adelaide, Australia         http://lca2004.linux.org.au/

       "That whole 'you complete me' thing is just tragic and totally
                    unrealistic. Go complete yourself."
Murray.Cumming | 1 May 10:13 2003

RE: Proposal: Workrave

> From: Jeff Waugh [mailto:jdub <at> perkypants.org] 
> <quote who="Murray.Cumming <at> Comneon.com">
> 
> > > From: Raymond Penners [mailto:raymond <at> dotsphinx.com] 
> Ofcourse, but that
> > > would not really scare us. For now, I think it is not 
> really feasible as
> > > Workrave is written in C++ and is gtkmm based. From what 
> I understand,
> > > gtkmm is not part of the main GNOME distribution, yet?
> > 
> > I don't think this is a problm. It seems similar to 
> gstreamer, which is
> > not part of the Platform, but is used by applications in 
> the Desktop.
> 
> But then gtkmm would need to be added to the desktop release 
> (which was the
> issue Raymond raised, without saying "platform" or "desktop").

Yes.

Murray Cumming
murrayc <at> usa.net
www.murrayc.com 
Ross Burton | 1 May 11:13 2003

Re: LibXML2 Indentation

On Wed, 2003-04-30 at 17:32, Chipzz wrote:
> You may not want to edit them, but suppose you (or a bug in a program)
> somehow screwed up your configuration. Then you could do:
> 
> mv .gconf .gconf-old
> gnome-session &
> diff -ur .gconf-old .gconf
> 
> and see what went wrong (which settings are actually different).
> THAT is an advantage of human-readable formats, not that you can edit
> them. But since gconf doesn't use indentation, everything gets put on
> one line, and this is essentially 100% useless. At which point you
> might just as well use a binary format, because it doesn't matter any-
> way.
> Having gconf indent its files may lead to easier bug-reporting, and
> not having to blow away your entire configuration because some program
> screwed up.

If you were going to diff XML files, the sane way is to use an XML-aware
diff tool in collapse-whitespace mode. This will ignore the whitespace
and only look at the structural changes, and at the same time report the
changed nodes in a far more sensible manner.

Ross
--

-- 
Ross Burton                                 mail: ross <at> burtonini.com
                                      jabber: ross <at> jabber.debian.net
                                    www: http://www.burtonini.com./
 PGP Fingerprint: 1A21 F5B0 D8D0 CFE3 81D4 E25A 2D09 E447 D0B4 33DF
(Continue reading)

Murray.Cumming | 1 May 12:03 2003

2.4 Proposed Modules - gucharmap

More low-hanging fruit:

>   gucharmap - A full-featured unicode character map tool.
>   http://gucharmap.sourceforge.net/

So, how does the gucharmap maintainer feel about being part of GNOME?

I remember some talk about accessibility problems? What's the status of
that, or plans?

Murray Cumming
murrayc <at> usa.net
www.murrayc.com 
Bill Haneman | 1 May 12:56 2003
Picon

Re: TARBALLS DUE: GNOME 2.3.1 Development Desktop Release

On Thu, 2003-05-01 at 07:03, Jeff Waugh wrote:
...
>   drwright - Enforces keyboard/computer breaks to avoid RSI/radiation
>     sickness.

"radiation sickness" ???

Sorry, can't let that one pass ;-)

drwright could not possibly protect anyone against any form or radiation
sickness... fortunately "radiation sickness" is caused by excess
exposure to gamma radiation, which is (again fortunately) not emitted by
modern CRT or LCD monitors[1][2].

[1] I was once peripherally involved in an actual study measuring the
gamma emissions from CRTs.  Even for high-voltage CRTs we found only
trace emissions, which turned out to be coming from the glass, and were
the same whether the monitor was off or on.  Ordinary (glass) eyeglasses
are also radioactive to the same extent, due to traces of radioactive
potassium-14 in almost all glass; Corning came up with special
"low-radioactivity glass" in about 1961 for use in laboratory
applications where the radioactivity would interfere with measurements.

[2] Some old monitors used "rare earth" compounds in their color
phosphors, which could contain trace quantities of other radioactive
contaminants; this was way before most of this list was born ;-)

[3] Perhaps drwright needs a disclaimer saying that it's not intended
for use in the core of nuclear reactors or in heavy fallout zones ;-)

(Continue reading)

Bill Haneman | 1 May 12:59 2003
Picon

Re: TARBALLS DUE: GNOME 2.3.1 Development Desktop Release

On Thu, 2003-05-01 at 07:03, Jeff Waugh wrote:
...> 

Nit:
>   gnome-mag - Desktop magnification library
                           (with standalone CLI)

>   gnome-speech - A library designed to provide a simple, general API for
>     producing text-to-speech output.
...
Nit:

>   gnopernicus - A screen reader based on gnome-speech.
"integrated screen reader/magnifier based on gnome-speech and
gnome-mag".

>   gok - The 'GNOME On-screen Keyboard', an accessibility tool.

:-)

Bill
Rui Miguel Seabra | 1 May 14:18 2003

Re: LibXML2 Indentation

Hi,

Is there such a tool that is Free Software, or is this just a moot
point? Besides that, the only added value over diff is to also notify
structural changes.

However, XML is supposed to be human readable. If it's displayed as
gibberish (which is mostly what one huge line seems) then it's not very
different from a binary format with a known structure.

A transparent format (which is what xml usually is) becomes not
transparent when it is made in such a way that it is much harder to
read. Even if it's not defined like that, I think that as a principle
the only space aware tags should be the ones with content that _needs_
space awareness. How many gconf tags need it?

Regards, Rui

On Thu, 2003-05-01 at 09:13, Ross Burton wrote:
> If you were going to diff XML files, the sane way is to use an XML-aware
> diff tool in collapse-whitespace mode. This will ignore the whitespace
> and only look at the structural changes, and at the same time report the
> changed nodes in a far more sensible manner.

--

-- 
+ No matter how much you do, you never do enough -- unknown
+ Whatever you do will be insignificant,
| but it is very important that you do it -- Gandhi
+ So let's do it...?

(Continue reading)


Gmane