Lawrence Stewart | 1 Aug 16:02 2010

Re: Scale modl Cray-1

http://simh.trailing-edge.org or google simh

there are many machines and an active community. the effort is coordinated by Bob Supnik, ex from many
machine projects at Digital. he credits me with the original idea for the project, but that is way too much credit.

simh mostly has minicomputers and older machines. software is available for most of them.

for a while Bob was my boss at SiCortex, and one year at SC we had 12 emulators running simultaneously on one of
the 72 core deskside machines. fun.

-Larry

On Jul 30, 2010, at 11:15 AM, Gus Correa <gus <at> ldeo.columbia.edu> wrote:

> Hearns, John wrote:
>> Enjoy.  http://www.theregister.co.uk/2010/07/29/cray_1_replica/
>> The contents of this email are confidential and for the exclusive use of the intended recipient.  If you
receive this email in error you should not copy it, retransmit it, use it or disclose its contents but
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> 
> 
> In this age of virtualization,
> I was wondering if there are simulators in software (say, for Linux)
> of famous old computers: PDP-11, VAX, Cray-1, IBM 1130, IBM/360,
> CDC 6600, even the ENIAC perhaps.
> From instruction set, to OS, to applications.
> 
(Continue reading)

Gus Correa | 2 Aug 04:02 2010

Re: Scale modl Cray-1

Thank you all who responded:
Larry Stewart, David Lombard, Franklin Jones,
Douglas Guptill, Thomasz Rolla, Jim Lux.

Glad to see that many of you had not only thought of this,
but actually implemented simulators for many outstanding computers.

I compiled SIMH.

However, I suppose I need to load software to actually simulate
each computer (Assembler? OS? other more specific sw?), correct?

If yes, is this software available, and where?

Any documentation on how to run them?

Many thanks,
Gus Correa

Lawrence Stewart wrote:
> http://simh.trailing-edge.org or google simh
> 
> there are many machines and an active community. the effort is coordinated by Bob Supnik, ex from many
machine projects at Digital. he credits me with the original idea for the project, but that is way too much credit.
> 
> simh mostly has minicomputers and older machines. software is available for most of them.
> 
> for a while Bob was my boss at SiCortex, and one year at SC we had 12 emulators running simultaneously on one
of the 72 core deskside machines. fun.
> 
(Continue reading)

David N. Lombard | 2 Aug 17:15 2010
Picon

Re: Scale modl Cray-1

On Sun, Aug 01, 2010 at 07:02:09PM -0700, Gus Correa wrote:
> Thank you all who responded:
> Larry Stewart, David Lombard, Franklin Jones,
> Douglas Guptill, Thomasz Rolla, Jim Lux.
> 
> Glad to see that many of you had not only thought of this,
> but actually implemented simulators for many outstanding computers.
> 
> I compiled SIMH.
> 
> However, I suppose I need to load software to actually simulate
> each computer (Assembler? OS? other more specific sw?), correct?
> 
> If yes, is this software available, and where?

The 1130 sw is available from ibm1130.org
<http://ibm1130.org/sim/downloads>.

I expect that type of software will usually only be available from
the people and projects that are interested in the simulated system.

> Any documentation on how to run them?

The 1130 sw is sufficiently documented to run it.  I've run it--and
as expected--it *does* run faster than the original hw.

--

-- 
David N. Lombard, Intel, Irvine, CA
I do not speak for Intel Corporation; all comments are strictly my own.
(Continue reading)

p2pnve2010 | 3 Aug 04:33 2010
Picon

[CFP] P2P-NVE 2010 (Deadline: August 20, 2010)

Dear Colleagues, You are invited to submit papers to "The 4th International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Networked Virtual Environments (P2P-NVE 2010)" in conjunction with "The 16th International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Systems (ICPADS 2010)," held on December 8-10, 2010 in Shanghai, China. Please submit your papers soon and help distribute the CFP attached. All Accepted papers will be published by IEEE and will be included in IEEE Xplore. Best regards, Jehn-Ruey Jiang Program Chair of P2P-NVE 2010 Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering National Central University Jhongli City, Taoyuan, 32001, Taiwan ============================================================================ = Call for Papers The 4th International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Networked Virtual Environments (P2P-NVE 2010) in conjunction with The 16th International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Systems (ICPADS 2010) December 8 -10, 2010 Shanghai, China http://acnlab.csie.ncu.edu.tw/P2PNVE2010/ ============================================================================ = PURPOSE AND SCOPE A networked virtual environment (NVE), also known as a distributed virtual environment (DVE) or collaborative virtual environment (CVE), is a computer-generated virtual world where multiple users can assume virtual representatives (or avatars) to concurrently interact with each other via networked links. Examples of NVEs include early DARPA SIMNET and DIS systems as well as currently booming Massively Multiplayer Online Games (MMOGs). Some recent studies propose using P2P architectures to increase NVE scalability and to reduce NVE management and deployment costs. Typical examples of such studies are P2P voice chatting, P2P 3D streaming, P2P game state management, and so on. In spite of the success of the studies, we need more studies about state consistency control, persistent data storage, multimedia data dissemination, cheat-prevention, topology mismatching, and virtual world interoperability to construct NVEs of better performance. The 1st, 2nd and 3rd International Workshop on Peer-to-Peer Networked Virtual Environments were held in conjunction with the 13th, 14th and 15th International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Systems in 2007, 2008 and 2009, respectively. To adhere to the theme of P2P-NVE workshops, the theme of P2P-NVE 2010 is to solicit original and previously unpublished new ideas on general P2P schemes as well as on the design and realization of P2P NVEs. The workshop aims to facilitate discussions and idea exchanges by both academics and practitioners. Authors are invited to submit an electronic version of original, unpublished manuscripts, not to exceed 8 double-columned, single-spaced pages, to the workshop. Submitted papers should be in accordance with IEEE Computer Society guidelines, and will be refereed by reviewers in terms of relevance, originality, contribution, correctness, and presentation. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: - P2P systems and infrastructures - Applications of P2P systems - Performance evaluation of P2P systems - Trust and security issues in P2P systems - Network support for P2P systems - Fault tolerance in P2P systems - Data structures for P2P systems - Efficient P2P resource lookup and sharing - Distributed Hash Tables (DHTs) and related issues - Solutions to topology mismatching for P2P overlays - P2P overlays for NVEs - P2P NVE multicast - P2P NVE interoperability - P2P NVE content distribution - P2P NVE 3D streaming - P2P NVE voice communications - P2P NVE architecture designs - P2P NVE prototypes - P2P NVE consistency control - Persistent storage for P2P NVEs - Security and cheat-prevention mechanisms for P2P games - P2P control for mobile NVEs - P2P NVE applications on mobile devices IMPORTANT DATES Submission: August 20, 2010 Notification: September 15, 2010 Camera ready: October 1, 2010 PAPER SUBMISSION Authors are invited to submit an electronic version of original, unpublished manuscripts, not to exceed 8 double-columned, single-spaced pages, to the workshop. Submitted papers should be in PDF format in accordance with IEEE Computer Society guidelines, and will be refereed by reviewers in terms of originality, contribution, correctness, and presentation.

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Rahul Nabar | 5 Aug 23:47 2010
Picon

what defines "enterprise class" hard drives?

I wanted to buy some 1 Terabyte SATA drives for our storage array and
wanted to stay away from the cheap desktop stuff. But each
manufacturer has some "enterprise class drives". But is there
something specific to look for? Most of those seem to have a MTBF of
around 1.2 million hours and a URE of about 1 in 10^15. The S.M.A.R.T.
abilities seem fairly standard.  Is there a list somewhere of well
tested drives? Or any recommendations?

--

-- 
Rahul
Jon Forrest | 6 Aug 00:33 2010
Picon

Re: what defines "enterprise class" hard drives?

On 8/5/2010 2:47 PM, Rahul Nabar wrote:
> I wanted to buy some 1 Terabyte SATA drives for our storage array and
> wanted to stay away from the cheap desktop stuff. But each
> manufacturer has some "enterprise class drives". But is there
> something specific to look for? Most of those seem to have a MTBF of
> around 1.2 million hours and a URE of about 1 in 10^15. The S.M.A.R.T.
> abilities seem fairly standard.  Is there a list somewhere of well
> tested drives? Or any recommendations?

We've talked about this topic on this list
before. There are several schools of thought.
Some people base their opinions on the manufacturer's
claims, and some people base their opinions
on the famous papers from Google and CMU that
came out a couple of years ago that described
how very large numbers of drives really work.

It's an interesting topic, no doubt.

Cordially,

--

-- 
Jon Forrest
Research Computing Support
College of Chemistry
173 Tan Hall
University of California Berkeley
Berkeley, CA
94720-1460
510-643-1032
jlforrest <at> berkeley.edu
Rahul Nabar | 6 Aug 00:42 2010
Picon

Re: what defines "enterprise class" hard drives?

On Thu, Aug 5, 2010 at 5:33 PM, Jon Forrest <jlforrest <at> berkeley.edu> wrote:
> We've talked about this topic on this list
> before. There are several schools of thought.
> Some people base their opinions on the manufacturer's
> claims, and some people base their opinions
> on the famous papers from Google and CMU that
> came out a couple of years ago that described
> how very large numbers of drives really work.
>
> It's an interesting topic, no doubt.

Ah! The google hard disk list. Thanks! I totally forgot about that
one. I'll look there.

--

-- 
Rahul
Rahul Nabar | 6 Aug 00:44 2010
Picon

Re: what defines "enterprise class" hard drives?

On Thu, Aug 5, 2010 at 5:34 PM, Perry E. Metzger <perry <at> piermont.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 5 Aug 2010 16:47:19 -0500 Rahul Nabar <rpnabar <at> gmail.com>
> wrote:
>> I wanted to buy some 1 Terabyte SATA drives for our storage array
>> and wanted to stay away from the cheap desktop stuff. But each
>> manufacturer has some "enterprise class drives". But is there
>> something specific to look for? Most of those seem to have a MTBF of
>> around 1.2 million hours and a URE of about 1 in 10^15. The
>> S.M.A.R.T. abilities seem fairly standard.  Is there a list
>> somewhere of well tested drives? Or any recommendations?
>
> Why do you want to pay more for drives?
>
> If you have hundreds or thousands of machines, you will get failures
> no matter what, so you will need to set up your software to deal with
> failures no matter what. Assuming that a failure doesn't cause you
> much harm, you might as well simply accept a slightly higher failure
> rate in exchange for being able to pay less per node, which lets you
> buy more nodes. You can always keep spares, and indeed, you will have
> to in either case.

Sure, I do have a RAID level on it so a failure per-se isn't disaster.
And I wouldn't pay a $1000 dollar premium for it. But I wouldn't mind
paying $50 more if it translates to less trips to the cluster room and
fewer RAID rebuilds.

That's why I'm trying to buy something better than a cheap run-of-the
mill from newegg.

--

-- 
Rahul

Sabuj Pattanayek | 6 Aug 00:57 2010
Picon

Re: what defines "enterprise class" hard drives?

Hi,

For SATA drives, my take is that if it has a 3YR warranty then it's a
consumer line drive. If it has a 5YR warranty from the manufacturer
then I consider it an "enterprise" class drive, even if it's not
branded as such. That being said, I think I saw some western digital
black drives with 5YR warranties (on newegg) that are not branded as
"enterprise" so they don't cost twice as much.

However, there are (or at least used to be) features of enterprise
class drives which are not available on the consumer line of drives.
Whether or not these features are necessary for operation on your
brand of storage array is something you should check. The good
companies that make storage arrays have a matrix/list of
drives+firmware versions that they've tested and qualified for use
with their arrays.

If your array is a bunch of rack servers, make sure the controllers
will accept non-branded/certified drives (e.g. make sure it doesn't
require a Dell, HP, or IBM branded drive).

After having determine that your array will take COTS components, and
if you can go with slightly slower drives, I'd go with the WD Caviar
green series, black if you want something faster. I'd stay away from
the really cheap 5400 RPM Seagate drives.

On Thu, Aug 5, 2010 at 5:33 PM, Jon Forrest <jlforrest <at> berkeley.edu> wrote:
> On 8/5/2010 2:47 PM, Rahul Nabar wrote:
>>
>> I wanted to buy some 1 Terabyte SATA drives for our storage array and
>> wanted to stay away from the cheap desktop stuff. But each
>> manufacturer has some "enterprise class drives". But is there
>> something specific to look for? Most of those seem to have a MTBF of
>> around 1.2 million hours and a URE of about 1 in 10^15. The S.M.A.R.T.
>> abilities seem fairly standard.  Is there a list somewhere of well
>> tested drives? Or any recommendations?

Bruno Coutinho | 6 Aug 01:28 2010
Picon

Re: what defines "enterprise class" hard drives?

Seagate claims that their ES.2 SATA disks have higher rotational vibration tolerance.
This could be useful if you have several disks working close to each other.


2010/8/5 Rahul Nabar <rpnabar <at> gmail.com>
On Thu, Aug 5, 2010 at 5:34 PM, Perry E. Metzger <perry <at> piermont.com> wrote:
> On Thu, 5 Aug 2010 16:47:19 -0500 Rahul Nabar <rpnabar <at> gmail.com>
> wrote:
>> I wanted to buy some 1 Terabyte SATA drives for our storage array
>> and wanted to stay away from the cheap desktop stuff. But each
>> manufacturer has some "enterprise class drives". But is there
>> something specific to look for? Most of those seem to have a MTBF of
>> around 1.2 million hours and a URE of about 1 in 10^15. The
>> S.M.A.R.T. abilities seem fairly standard.  Is there a list
>> somewhere of well tested drives? Or any recommendations?
>
> Why do you want to pay more for drives?
>
> If you have hundreds or thousands of machines, you will get failures
> no matter what, so you will need to set up your software to deal with
> failures no matter what. Assuming that a failure doesn't cause you
> much harm, you might as well simply accept a slightly higher failure
> rate in exchange for being able to pay less per node, which lets you
> buy more nodes. You can always keep spares, and indeed, you will have
> to in either case.

Sure, I do have a RAID level on it so a failure per-se isn't disaster.
And I wouldn't pay a $1000 dollar premium for it. But I wouldn't mind
paying $50 more if it translates to less trips to the cluster room and
fewer RAID rebuilds.

That's why I'm trying to buy something better than a cheap run-of-the
mill from newegg.

--
Rahul

_______________________________________________
Beowulf mailing list, Beowulf <at> beowulf.org sponsored by Penguin Computing
To change your subscription (digest mode or unsubscribe) visit http://www.beowulf.org/mailman/listinfo/beowulf

<div>
<p>Seagate claims that their ES.2 SATA disks have <span>higher  rotational vibration tolerance</span>.<br>This could be useful if you have several disks working close to each other.<br><br><br></p>
<div class="gmail_quote">
2010/8/5 Rahul Nabar <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:rpnabar <at> gmail.com">rpnabar <at> gmail.com</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote">
On Thu, Aug 5, 2010 at 5:34 PM, Perry E. Metzger &lt;<a href="mailto:perry <at> piermont.com">perry <at> piermont.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br><div class="im">&gt; On Thu, 5 Aug 2010 16:47:19 -0500 Rahul Nabar &lt;<a href="mailto:rpnabar <at> gmail.com">rpnabar <at> gmail.com</a>&gt;<br>
&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt; I wanted to buy some 1 Terabyte SATA drives for our storage array<br>
&gt;&gt; and wanted to stay away from the cheap desktop stuff. But each<br>
&gt;&gt; manufacturer has some "enterprise class drives". But is there<br>
&gt;&gt; something specific to look for? Most of those seem to have a MTBF of<br>
&gt;&gt; around 1.2 million hours and a URE of about 1 in 10^15. The<br>
&gt;&gt; S.M.A.R.T. abilities seem fairly standard. &nbsp;Is there a list<br>
&gt;&gt; somewhere of well tested drives? Or any recommendations?<br>
&gt;<br>
</div>&gt; Why do you want to pay more for drives?<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; If you have hundreds or thousands of machines, you will get failures<br>
&gt; no matter what, so you will need to set up your software to deal with<br>
&gt; failures no matter what. Assuming that a failure doesn't cause you<br>
&gt; much harm, you might as well simply accept a slightly higher failure<br>
&gt; rate in exchange for being able to pay less per node, which lets you<br>
&gt; buy more nodes. You can always keep spares, and indeed, you will have<br>
&gt; to in either case.<br><br>
Sure, I do have a RAID level on it so a failure per-se isn't disaster.<br>
And I wouldn't pay a $1000 dollar premium for it. But I wouldn't mind<br>
paying $50 more if it translates to less trips to the cluster room and<br>
fewer RAID rebuilds.<br><br>
That's why I'm trying to buy something better than a cheap run-of-the<br>
mill from newegg.<br><div>
<div></div>
<div class="h5">
<br>
--<br>
Rahul<br><br>
_______________________________________________<br>
Beowulf mailing list, <a href="mailto:Beowulf <at> beowulf.org">Beowulf <at> beowulf.org</a> sponsored by Penguin Computing<br>
To change your subscription (digest mode or unsubscribe) visit <a href="http://www.beowulf.org/mailman/listinfo/beowulf" target="_blank">http://www.beowulf.org/mailman/listinfo/beowulf</a><br>
</div>
</div>
</blockquote>
</div>
<br>
</div>

Gmane